Thursday

16th Aug 2018

EU to send smuggled Syrians back to Turkey

The EU will start returning all irregular migrants back to Turkey from the Greek islands, including smuggled Syrian nationals, under a plan hammered out with Turkey's prime minister Ahmet Davutoglu at a summit in Brussels.

"The prime minister [Davutoglu] confirmed to accept the rapid return of all migrants coming from Turkey to Greece that are not in need of international protection," EU Council president Donald Tusk told reporters in the early hours of Tuesday (8 March).

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Support quality EU news

Get instant access to all articles — and 18 year's of archives. 30 days free trial.

... or join as a group

  • German leader Merkel was architect of new EU-Turkey plan (Photo: Consillium)

Syrian refugees smuggled into Greece will be sent back to Turkey where they will have to apply for asylum.

For every one Syrian sent back to Turkey from the Greek islands, one Syrian from Turkey will be resettled to an EU state on a "one-to-one basis".

Details on how to implement the plans will be discussed at the next EU summit in Brussels on 17-18 March.

But two EU sources told this website it will be linked to a previous EU agreement to resettle 22,000 people to EU states.

Should all 22,000 be resettled, then another 54,000 could be added, they said.

Game changer

German chancellor Angela Merkel, who inspired the plan said that with it, "irregular migration will be turned into regular migration".

"The establishment of legal channels to Europe from Turkey and Greece and immediate humanitarian assistance will assist in managing the refugee crisis by respecting human rights and dignity of refugees," Greek prime minister Alexis Tsipras said.

In the meantime, EU leaders also decided to end the "wave-through approach" of sending migrants to neighbouring countries.

"The irregular flow of migrants along the Western Balkan route have now come to an end," Tusk said.

European Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker, for his part, said the one-to-one principle agreed with Turkey was "a real game changer".

He noted the EU's asylum procedures law allows EU states to return people to a so-called "safe third country of origin".

But Amnesty International’s deputy director for Europe and Central Asia, Gauri van Gulik, described designating Turkey as a "safe third country" as absurd.

“Many refugees still live in terrible conditions, some have been deported back to Syria and security forces have even shot at Syrians trying to cross the border,” he said in a statement.

Meanwhile, Syrians caught trying to cross using smugglers will be knocked to the bottom of a list for those wanting to be resettled to the EU from Turkey.

Turkey will also have to take back all irregular migrants apprehended in their waters.

"We made a bold decision by accepting all irregular, illegal migrants going from Turkey, irrespective of their origins," said Davutoglu.

But the deal is linked to conditions.

All visiting Turkish nationals will be granted free travel access to the EU's passport-free Schengen area by the end of June.

In addition, Ankara demanded to accelerate its membership talks, with the EU agreeing to open up five new chapters.

Free speech

The deal also includes the EU pumping another €3 billion, on top of a previous €3 billion, into humanitarian aid efforts for the some 2.7 million Syrian refugees in Turkey.

Davutoglu insisted all the money will go to Syrian refugees, noting that "not even a single euro will be spent on Turkish citizens."

The plan is to start financing relief efforts in the camps "in the coming days".

He also blamed, in part, Russian airstrikes in Syria for enflaming the refugee exodus to Turkey and Europe.

Davutoglu had suggested setting up safe zones in Syria but the idea was broadly dismissed by EU leaders.

Instead, discussions on how to support the unraveling Syrian ceasefire were held in a separate meeting in the margins of the summit between Davutoglu, Germany's chancellor Angela Merkel, UK prime minister David Cameron and French president Francois Hollande among others.

Davutoglu also dismissed notions his government's decision to close down Zaman, a leading newspaper in Istanbul, was politically motivated.

A court ordered last Friday the takover of the paper, which had taken a critical stand against Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

"Freedom of speech is our basic value, not only of the European Union, but of Turkey," said Davutoglu.

’Over there’

Commenting on the summit outcome, British PM David Cameron said the deal, “if implemented, break the smugglers’ business model and end the link between getting in a boat and getting settlement in Europe.”

The Dutch and Italian leaders mentioned the importance to them of EU values, including on free press.

The Polish PM Beata Szydlo said: “The refugee problem should be solved outside the borders of the European Union … today I think, we came closer and took a big step to solving the problem over there, on Turkish territory.”

EU-Turkey plan: no refugees on Greek islands

According to a new deal discussed Monday, Turkey would take all migrants who crossed illegally into Greece, while the EU would take Syrians directly from Turkey among other new concessions.

UN 'deeply concerned' by EU-Turkey plan

The UN has spoken out against blanket returns to Turkey after EU leaders earlier Tuesday agreed to a provisional plan to start clearing Greek islands of irregular migrants.

Opinion

EU-Turkey refugee deal doesn't add up

The EU-Turkey "one-for-one" resettlement deal doesn't make sense and won't work. But at least it puts the principle of resettlement in the fore of EU policy.

Greece and Turkey intensify joint work on migrants

Greece and Turkey sign agreements to be able to send back migrants to Turkish soil, as Slovenia, Croatia and Serbia introduce tight restrictions, essentially shutting down the route for refugees.

Interview

Albania won't become EU 'gateway,' Italian admiral says

The Western Balkan country "has very attentive border control", Italy’s former defence chief has said, adding that a deal with Russia on Syria is the best way to restore “stability”.

News in Brief

  1. Salvini questions EU 'constraints' after bridge collapse
  2. Bosnian Serbs to rewrite 1995 Srebrenica genocide report
  3. Malta to allow Aquarius migrants to disembark
  4. Juncker sends condolences over Genoa bridge collapse
  5. EU pledges €500,000 more for Indonesian earthquake island
  6. EU commission in talks with states on new Aquarius migrants
  7. Man held after car crashes into UK parliament security barrier
  8. Brexit delays better readability of medicines' instructions

EU ready to shore up Morocco migrant funding

The European Commission says it is ready to boost spending in Morocco when it comes to stop migrant hopefuls from reaching Spain by boat. The money follows demands for help from Madrid as irregular arrival numbers spike in Spain.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. ACCACompany Law Package: Making the Best of Digital and Cross Border Mobility,
  2. IPHRCivil Society Worried About Shortcomings in EU-Kyrgyzstan Human Rights Dialogue
  3. UNESDAThe European Soft Drinks Industry Supports over 1.7 Million Jobs
  4. Mission of China to the EUJointly Building Belt and Road Initiative Leads to a Better Future for All
  5. IPHRCivil society asks PACE to appoint Rapporteur to probe issue of political prisoners in Azerbaijan
  6. ACCASocial Mobility – How Can We Increase Opportunities Through Training and Education?
  7. Nordic Council of MinistersEnergy Solutions for a Greener Tomorrow
  8. UNICEFWhat Kind of Europe Do Children Want? Unicef & Eurochild Launch Survey on the Europe Kids Want
  9. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Countries Take a Stand for Climate-Smart Energy Solutions
  10. Mission of China to the EUChina: Work Together for a Better Globalisation
  11. Nordic Council of MinistersNordics Could Be First Carbon-Negative Region in World
  12. European Federation of Allergy and AirwaysLife Is Possible for Patients with Severe Asthma

Latest News

  1. US trial sheds light on murky Cyprus-Russia links
  2. Burned cars fuel Swedish election debate
  3. EU court to hear citizens' climate case against EU
  4. How long can Bulgaria keep facing both East and West?
  5. EU commission steps up legal case against Poland
  6. Separation of powers instead of 'Spitzenkandidat' process
  7. Revealed: ExxonMobil's private dinner with Cyprus' top EU brass
  8. What Salvini teaches us about Operation Sophia

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. PKEE - Polish Energy AssociationCommon-Sense Approach Needed for EU Energy Reform
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Region to Lead in Developing and Rolling Out 5G Network
  3. Mission of China to the EUChina-EU Economic and Trade Relations Enjoy a Bright Future
  4. ACCAEmpowering Businesses to Engage with Sustainable Finance and the SDGs
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersCooperation in Nordic Electricity Market Considered World Class Model
  6. FIFAGreen Stadiums at the 2018 Fifa World Cup
  7. Mission of China to the EUChina and EU Work Together to Promote Sustainable Development
  8. Counter BalanceEuropean Ombudsman Requests More Lending Transparency from European Investment Bank
  9. FIFARecycling at the FIFA World Cup in Russia
  10. Nordic Council of MinistersOECD Report: Gender Equality Boosts GDP Growth in Nordic Region
  11. Centre Maurits Coppieters“Peace and Reconciliation Is a Process That Takes Decades” Dr. Anthony Soares on #Brexit and Northern Ireland
  12. Mission of China to the EUMEPs Positive on China’s New Measures of Opening Up

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us