Friday

23rd Feb 2018

Greek court halts Syrian deportations to 'unsafe' Turkey

  • Migrants leaving Lesbos island (Photo: Reuters)

A Greek appeals committee this week ruled Turkey is not safe enough to return Syrian refugees, casting further doubt on the EU's migrant swap deal with Ankara.

Nine Syrian refugees facing deportation will now remain in Greece following a decision earlier this week by an administrative appeals committee in Lesbos, a Greek island.

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German-based NGO Pro Asyl, which defended the nine people, said the appeals committee will issue more decisionslike that in the near future.

"There are a number of further positive decisions which have not been delivered yet," the NGO said on Wednesday (1 June).

In a separate case, a Syrian, who said he was gay and risked being persecuted in Turkey, was told by Greek authorities on Thursday he would be returned. His appeal was rejected.

The EU deal with Ankara, signed off in March, hinges on designating Turkey as a safe country to send all irregular migrants packing.

Under the terms of the deal, the EU would resettle one Syrian refugee from Turkey for each one that is returned.

Some 280 Syrians have been resettled to the EU as of late May. But only 441 of the 8,500 people who arrived on the Greek islands since the deal was signed have been returned.

Amnesty International, in a report out on Friday (3 June), also said asylum seekers and refugees are being denied effective protection in Turkey.

“The EU-Turkey deal is reckless and illegal," said John Dalhuisen, Amnesty International’s Director for Europe and Central Asia, in a statement.

He said Turkey was already unable to respect the rights and meet the needs of over 3 million asylum-seekers and refugees.

"While there is value in supporting and encouraging Turkey to develop a fully functioning asylum system, the EU cannot act as if it already exists," he said.

Over 1 million people arrived last year to seek international protection in Europe. Of those, around 850,000 landed on the Greek islands.

EU defends Turkey deal in light of Greek court ruling

The EU Commission on Monday fended off suggestions a decision by a Greek apeals court not to send back a Syrian aslyum seeker to Turkey, because it is not safe, doesn not endanger the EU-Turkey deal.

EU asks for G7's help on refugees

EU Council president Donald Tusk said the world should show solidarity and help to pay for aid to refugees and encourage regular migration.

Agenda

Migration This WEEK, as Brexit looms

Officials already preparing for aftermath of Brexit referendum, but this week EU institutions will focus on migration as Commission unveils ideas on what to do overseas.

Opinion

European donors help Syrian school children

European donors should encourage Lebanon to revise policies keeping children out of school and to increase resettlement of Syrian refugees from Lebanon.

Frontex naval operation to look for 'foreign fighters'

The EU border and coast guard agency, or Frontex, has launched a new naval operation called Themis. The operation replaces its surveillance Triton mission but with a bigger emphasis on security and intelligence gathering.

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