Monday

17th Feb 2020

UN concerned by Hungary's migrant push-backs

  • Hungary's fence with Serbia has managed to keep migrants out (Photo: Freedom House)

The UN's refugee agency, the UNHCR, said Friday (15 July) it was "deeply concerned" by the further restrictions to Hungary's asylum rules, leading to push-backs of people seeking help, and over reports of violence and abuse.

The UN agency said 1,400 migrants and refugees are now stranded on the Hungarian-Serbian border.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Support quality EU news

Get instant access to all articles — and 20 years of archives. 14-day free trial.

... or join as a group

They are waiting to enter one of the two transit zones into Hungary along the 175-kilometre long Serbian border, with Hungarian authorities letting through just 30 people per day.

According to the UNHCR, the majority of them are women and children, as well as people with special needs, who are "particularly affected by the deteriorating humanitarian situation."

New rules introduced earlier this month extended border controls to an 8-kilometre stretch within Hungary. It allows police to intercept people in these areas and send them back to the other side of the fence.

Since the new legislation came into force, a total of 664 people were sent back, the UNHCR said.

Hungary erected a fence along its Serbian and Croatian frontiers last year to stop the uncontrolled flow of migrants.

The government has also beefed up border security ,with 10,000 soldiers and police officers, as well as drone and helicopter surveillance.

Violence at the transit zones

The UN agency said it is continuing to receive reports of violence when people were apprehended within the transit zones, or in police detention facilities, including beatings, dog bites and use of pepper spray.

The UN agency has urged Hungary to investigate the reports.

“These restrictions are at variance with EU and international law, and reports of abuse need to be investigated,” William Spindler, a UNHCR spokesman told press Geneva.

Hungary rebuffed claims of violence.

Janos Lazar, the minister in charge of prime minister Viktor Orban’s office, denied on Thursday that Hungarian police or soldiers had mistreated asylum seekers.

The UNHCR described the situation in the transit zones as "dire", with families sleeping in the open or in makeshift tents next to the fence in poor hygiene conditions.

Last week a 10-year old Afghan boy drowned while trying to wash in a nearby pond, the BBC reported. The UNHCR is mediating with the Serbian and Hungarian authorities about where to bury the dead child.

The UN agency warned that the conditions could make people turn to smugglers to get across, putting them at risk.

Earlier this week, US-based NGO Human Rights Watch also rang the alarm bell, saying Hungary forced back migrants, which is against international law and EU law, and in some cases uses "cruel and violent treatment."

Hungary's interior ministry denounced the NGO's accusations.

Hungary rejects accusations

It said in a statement that HRW is "misconstruing the rules relating to the asylum proceedings out of obvious ignorance of the situation."

"Hungary observes the Schengen rules relating to border controls as well as the Geneva Convention," the statement added, saying Hungary guarantees legal entry and filing of asylum requests.

Last year, some 400,000 people crossed Hungary on their way to Western and Northern Europe, until Hungary raised the razor wire fence.

Hungary has also been reluctant to take in refugees through EU-wide schemes.

Hungary's prime minister Viktor Orban called for a referendum on 2 October on whether to allow the EU to set mandatory quotas for Hungary to take in asylum seekers.

Stakes grow in Hungary's migration referendum

Orban's referendum on migration in October is designed to alter EU policy and boost his popularity. But in the post-Brexit climate it could mark a bigger anti-EU swerve.

Hungary to hold referendum on EU migration plan

Hungary's government has initiated a referendum on the EU's migrants quota plan, PM Viktor Orban said Wednesday. Hungary, along with Slovakia, has already challenged the plan at the EU's top court.

Hungary steps up campaign on migration referendum

Hungary's government has unveiled six billboards linking the migration crisis to terrorism and crime in an effort to win backing for its referendum on the EU's migration policy.

Asylum seeker stuck almost three years in Moria camp

Anny Nganga, an asylum seeker from DR Congo, has been surviving for almost three years in Moria, a camp on Lesbos island that was recently described as the "single most worrying fundamental rights issue anywhere in the European Union".

News in Brief

  1. Michel proposes GNI 1.074 percent for budget
  2. Five Star Movement to protest against own government
  3. France pushing for tougher EU line on Brexit alignment
  4. Facebook delays EU roll-out of dating app
  5. Coronavirus a 'key risk' in EU's economic forecast
  6. Von dey Leyen defends record at German parliament inquiry
  7. Johnson loses finance and N. Ireland ministers in reshuffle
  8. Eight EU states warned over money-laundering delay

Opinion

Europe's migration system is broken: Renew has a plan

The failure of successful integration of migrants and refugees granted stay in Europe puts the entire asylum and migration policy at risk. Member states have to step up their integration policies.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersScottish parliament seeks closer collaboration with the Nordic Council
  2. UNESDAFrom Linear to Circular – check out UNESDA's new blog
  3. Nordic Council of Ministers40 years of experience have proven its point: Sustainable financing actually works
  4. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic and Baltic ministers paving the way for 5G in the region
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersEarmarked paternity leave – an effective way to change norms
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Climate Action Weeks in December

Latest News

  1. The last best chance for Donbas and peace in Europe?
  2. EU commissioner lobbied by energy firm he owns shares in
  3. Will coronavirus lead to medicine shortage in EU?
  4. EU transparency on lobbyist meetings still piecemeal
  5. 'Westlessness' - Western restlessness at China's ascent
  6. Central Europe mayors join in direct EU funds plea
  7. What you don't hear about Spain's migration policy
  8. 'Top-down' future of Europe conference 'will fail' warning

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us