Thursday

30th Mar 2017

MEPs approve Canada trade deal amid protest

  • Some MEPs showed anti-Ceta signss during the vote (Photo: European Parliament)

MEPs approved the EU-Canada trade deal on Wednesday (15 February), paving the way for provisional application of the accord to start as early as next month.

The European Parliament voted 408 in favour, 254 against, and 33 abstaining for the Ceta deal after an emotional debate in the plenary, during which opponents of the deal accused its supporters of putting multinational corporations' interests ahead of EU citizens, while those backing the deal charged critics of isolationism and populism.

Dear EUobserver reader

Subscribe now for unrestricted access to EUobserver.

Sign up for 30 days' free trial, no obligation. Full subscription only 15 € / month or 150 € / year.

  1. Unlimited access on desktop and mobile
  2. All premium articles, analysis, commentary and investigations
  3. EUobserver archives

EUobserver is the only independent news media covering EU affairs in Brussels and all 28 member states.

♡ We value your support.

If you already have an account click here to login.

  • Demonstrators protesting against the EP's approval of the Canada trade deal in Strasbourg. (Photo: Eszter Zalan)

The vote took place amid loud "Stop Ceta" chants from the chamber's galleries, as some MEPs opposing the deal joined in.

Several hundred demonstrators also protested against the deal in front of the parliament's Strasbourg building, in the presence of heavy security.

In the heated debate MEP Artis Pabriks, rapporteur for Ceta, argued that the deal represents a choice between protectionism and openness, and represent a "golden standard" for world trade.

He admitted that the deal, which removes 98 percent of tariffs between Canada and the EU and is estimated to save €500 million for European exporters annually, is not a cure for all the problems of workers and small and medium-sized businesses. But it is not meant to do that.

"Please do not bark at the wrong tree," he said.

Pabriks said that the far-right and the far-left in the parliament are united against everything that is good for the EU.

"If somebody is taking away the jobs, if somebody is taking the wealth of people of Europe ... then turn to these radicals on both sides," he said.

Green MEP Yannick Jadot however argued that it is the deal itself that is “feeding the fire of the extreme right”.

“If we don’t want Brexit or more Trump or more extreme right, we have to make Europe the pillar of public regulation for globalisation, meaning human rights, social rights, environmental rights above trade and investment rights, and Ceta is exactly the opposite,” he said.

French far-right leader Marine Le Pen called Ceta a terrible agreement that undermines jobs by removing tariffs.

"Are you not ashamed? You are giving away our rights to legislate, you are robbing citizens the protection of their rights that they expect from their representatives. [...] You’re making it possible for multinationals to attack member states making sure that no new legislation will displease them," she argued.

Anne-Marie Mineur from the leftist GUE group said that Ceta is a threat for everyone. "Ceta is a bad agreement, just good for multinationals," she said.

During the debate EU trade commissioner Cecilia Malmstroem argued that trade has made the EU the biggest economy in the world. She said countries are queuing up to trade with the EU but are now waiting to see if Europe is open for business.

"This is not business as usual," Malmstroem said.

She said that exports to Canada today already support around 900,000 jobs in Europe, and the deal will open more business opportunities for approximately 70,000 European companies exporting to Canada, with 80 percent of those being small and medium-sized enterprises.

Malmstroem argued that standards and EU states' right to regulate will not be hampered by Ceta.

"Nothing in this agreement undermines governments' right to regulate in the public interest. Nothing in this agreement affects the safety of food we eat or products we buy. Nothing prevents governments from providing public services or bringing these services back to the public domain if they had been privatised," she said, adding that MEPs will be involved in the implementation.

National responsibility

National parliaments in all EU member states will have to ratify the accord for it to be fully implemented. Some chapters, for instance the controversial investor court system, will not be applied until all member countries ratify it.

The ratification could take years, and the deal could still be challenged at the EU's top court.

Belgium, in a deal with its French-speaking Wallonia region to gain support for the federal government signing the agreement, pledged that it would ask the European Court of Justice to see if Ceta is in line with EU law.

Malmstroem, in a press conference after the vote, said the EU is looking at opening trade negotiations with 18 to 19 more countries.

She also highlighted the responsibility of the member states, pointing out that no trade negotiation can start without the unanimous consent of all EU countries.

Malmstroem admitted that there is skepticism about trade in Europe now, but warned that EU countries have to do their part in engaging citizens.

"Member states have to do their homework. After the negotiating mandate is given, they can start reaching out to citizens, there is time to engage the NGOs, civil societies, trade unions, national and regional parliaments," she said.

"That consultation cannot start at 5 to midnight. [It] has to start from [the] beginning," she said in a thinly veiled message to Belgium.

MEPs voted a day before Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau pays a visit to the European Parliament in Strasbourg on Thursday.

MEPs set to approve Canada trade deal

The European Parliament is expected to give the green light to the EU-Canada free trade agreement, which would start being implemented in April.

Opinion

The Wallonian mouse that roared

The Ceta battle was over what kind of globalisation will prevail, and how to cope with its turbulent centrifugal forces that pull at society’s seams. Wallonia deserves credit for shining a glaring spotlight where it was needed.

News in Brief

  1. UK publishes 'Great Repeal Bill' plan to replace EU laws
  2. Scots share May's vision for Brexit deal, survey says
  3. Coalition talks leader expects Dutch government by summer
  4. EU commission allows ex-member Hill to join law firm
  5. Reuters: Greece and lenders move closer to deal
  6. Italy: Le Pen win would mean 'permanent political risk'
  7. Danish parliament misinformed on Nord Stream 1
  8. UK delivered its Article 50 letter to the EU

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Malta EU 2017Green Light Given for New EU Regulation to Bolster External Border Checks
  2. The Idealist QuarterlyCan Progressive Stories Survive Our Post-Truth Era? After-Work Discussion on 6 April
  3. ACCAG20 Citizens Want 'Big Picture' Tax Policymaking, According to Global Survey
  4. Belgrade Security ForumCall for Papers: European Union as a Global Crisis Manager - Deadline 30 April
  5. European Gaming & Betting Association60 Years Rome Treaty – 60 Years Building an Internal Market
  6. Malta EU 2017New EU Rules to Prevent Terrorism and Give More Rights to Victims Approved
  7. European Jewish Congress"Extremists Still Have Ability and Motivation to Murder in Europe" Says EJC President
  8. European Gaming & Betting AssociationAudiovisual Media Services Directive to Exclude Minors from Gambling Ads
  9. ILGA-EuropeTime for a Reality Check on International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination
  10. UNICEFHuman Cost to Refugee and Migrant Children Mounts Up One Year After EU-Turkey Deal
  11. Malta EU 2017Council Adopts New Rules to Improve Safety of Medical Devices
  12. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Energy Research: How to Reach 100 Percent Renewable Energy

Latest News

  1. Hungary attempts to stifle Soros-founded university in Budapest
  2. European right shows divisions on EU values after Brexit
  3. Transparency is key EU tactic in Brexit talks
  4. Russia building 'arc of iron' around Europe
  5. Französische und deutsche Wahlen 'entscheidend' für Putin
  6. EU trying to salvage US deal on data privacy
  7. MEPs draw 'red lines' on Brexit deal
  8. MEPs call for reset in relations with Belarus

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Party of European SocialistsWe Must Renew Europe for All Europeans
  2. MEP Tomáš ZdechovskýThe European Commission Has Failed in Its Fight Against Food Waste
  3. ILGA-EuropeEP Recognises Discrimination Faced by Trans & Intersex People
  4. Nordic Council of Ministers25 Nordic Bioeconomy Cases for Sustainable Change
  5. European Free AllianceSupporting Artur Mas: Democracy and Freedom Cannot Be Convicted
  6. UNICEFSyria Conflict 6 Years On: Children's Suffering at Its Worst
  7. International Partnership for Human RightsDomestic Violence in Tajikistan: Time to Right the Wrongs
  8. European Trust SummitCorporate Strategy and Public Affairs in a Low-Trust World - Conference 31 May
  9. Malta EU 2017Agreement Reached to Involve Consumers in Financial Services Policymaking
  10. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Cities Gather Against Violent Extremism & Introduce Nordic Safe Cities
  11. World VisionFears and Dreams of Syria's Children and Their Peers Around the World
  12. Mission of China to the EUEU Window Chinese Government Academic Scholarship 2017/18 - Apply Now