Wednesday

14th Apr 2021

Stakeholder

Nordic PMs: We're committed to protecting women's rights

  • Five years after the adoption of the 2030 Agenda, it is clear that the fifth goal - ensuring gender equality - is the goal most countries are furthest from reaching (Photo: Magnus Fröderberg/Norden.org)

With International Women's Day last weekend (8 March), and as 2020 marks the 25th anniversary of the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, there are many reasons to celebrate the global progress that has been made on gender equality.

Regrettably, this hard-earned progress is being openly challenged.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Become an expert on Europe

Get instant access to all articles — and 20 years of archives. 14-day free trial.

... or subscribe as a group

We, the Nordic prime ministers, wish to express our grave concern over the current pushback against women's and girls' rights. We have witnessed a surge in regressive policies around the world, often undermining universal human rights.

The Nordic countries' success in promoting gender equality is a result of targeted government policies and strong civil societies, but it is also deeply rooted in international legal frameworks. We therefore wish to reiterate our joint commitment to the protection and promotion of the rights of women and girls, and more generally of universal human rights.

For over 40 years, the Nordic countries have worked collectively to promote gender equality. This has resulted in stronger economies and happier and more prosperous societies.

Key public policies include the provision of well-paid, shared parental leave, and universal, affordable, and high-quality child care.

When implemented properly, these policies enable women to participate in the labour market and public decision-making processes, while making space for men to share domestic responsibilities.

This has positive impact on gender equality at work and at home, and also leads to greater gender equality in public decision-making and a better gender balance among leaders.

The private sector must be a part of this. Increasing women's participation and ensuring more diverse leadership have proven not only to be the right thing to do but also the smart thing to do.

We are not done

However, despite the remarkable progress that has been made, gender-based structural inequalities are still evident across the region.

As in other countries, the discrimination multiplies when gender intersects with other protected characteristics, such as race, ethnicity, sexual orientation and disability. As an example, unemployment among women born in countries outside the EU/EEA remains higher than among other groups.

Overall, gendered trends persist in the Nordic labour markets. The majority of teachers and care workers are women, and men are more likely to work in the transport, construction and manufacturing sectors. Men are also overrepresented in leadership positions.

We are deeply concerned that despite massive efforts, we have not managed to eliminate violence against women, which the #MeToo movement so clearly exposed. In short: we have achieved a great deal, we are not done, and we are fully committed to continue.

At the international level, all the Nordic countries have put women's rights at the core of their foreign and development policies.

We are active participants in all major international organisations that promote universal human rights and work to eliminate discrimination against women and girls.

All Nordic countries have ratified the Council of Europe convention on preventing and combating violence against women and domestic violence (the Istanbul Convention).

We are strong advocates for women's sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR), and we oppose any attempt to deny women the right to legal and safe abortion and other health services.

Harmful practices, such as child marriage and female genital mutilation, should be consigned to history.

All the Nordic countries have drawn up plans to intensify their efforts to mark the 25th anniversary of the Beijing Declaration.

We are all actively supporting the UN Women's Generation Equality Forum campaign, and we are deeply committed to realising the UN Sustainable Development Goals. Five years after the adoption of the 2030 Agenda, it is clear that goal five, ensuring gender equality, is the goal most countries are furthest from reaching.

We will therefore continue to speak out internationally and to share our experience of moving towards gender equality and the benefits this has brought to our societies.

Gender equality by 2030

Today's generation of young people is larger than ever before.

They have a vital role to play in the realisation of gender equality. We commit to engaging with young people to achieve gender equality by 2030. We strongly urge the global community to do the same.

World leaders need to intensify their efforts to build a sustainable future where women and girls from all social backgrounds and parts of the world have access to education and health services, have equal opportunities to work and to take part in public life, and are free from the threat of sexual and gender-based violence.

We, the Nordic prime ministers, reaffirm our commitment to this vision.

Together, we can do it.

Author bio

Erna Solberg is prime minister of Norway, Katrín Jakobsdóttir is prime minister of Iceland, Mette Frederiksen is prime minister of Denmark, Sanna Marin is prime minister of Finland, Stefan Löfven is prime minister of Sweden. The article first appeared as an op-ed in CNN.

Disclaimer

This article is sponsored by a third party. All opinions in this article reflect the views of the author and not of EUobserver.

Denmark falls behind in gender-equality ranking

Iceland remains the most gender-equal country in the world, followed by Norway, Finland and Sweden. But one Nordic country sticks out from its neighbours with few female lawmakers, senior officials and managers.

Interview

China celebrates women's day, despite corona epidemic

Interview with Mrs. Cai Xiaoli, spouse of the Chinese ambassador to the EU, on the effect of the coronavirus outbreak in China and the celebration of women's day in China and Europe.

Coronavirus exposes increase in violence targeting women

Coronavirus lockdowns have triggered a spike in domestic, sexual and gender-based violence across Europe. However, experts stressed that the end of lockdowns will bring additional challenges, such as economic uncertainty or job losses, which can lead to more abuse.

Women benefit in the digitalised labour market

Women do better than men in a Nordic labour market characterised by digitalisation and rapid technological development. However, new Nordic research shows that traditionally male-dominated sectors are at risk of polarisation.

Europe & Africa - rebuilding the future

We often talk about the need to establish a relationship between equals in our partnership with Africa. This paradigm needs to be more than a declaration of good intentions

Incorporating gender in trade policy to benefit all

International research shows, countries that engage with international trade tend to have more gender-equality than less open economies. Trade policy is thus a powerful tool to create opportunities for women - if used properly.

News in Brief

  1. EU states make progress on Covid-19 'travel certificates'
  2. Michel pledges to protect von der Leyen's 'dignity' in future
  3. Libya frees UN-sanctioned human trafficker
  4. European court: jailed Turkish writer's rights violated
  5. EU set to miss 1m electric charging points by 2025 target
  6. Lavrov expects Iran nuclear deal to be saved
  7. France suspends flights from Brazil due to Covid variant
  8. Johnson & Johnson delays roll-out of vaccine in EU

Synergy need to tackle climate change in Mediterranean

The Interreg Med, a cross-border initiative of 13 countries around the Mediterranean Sea, has made the fight against climate change the cornerstone of its strategy for the next years - since the region is facing irreversible environmental damage.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersDigitalisation can help us pick up the green pace
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersCOVID19 is a wake-up call in the fight against antibiotic resistance
  3. Nordic Council of MinistersThe Nordic Region can and should play a leading role in Europe’s digital development
  4. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Council to host EU webinars on energy, digitalisation and antibiotic resistance
  5. UNESDAEU Code of Conduct can showcase PPPs delivering healthier more sustainable society
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersWomen benefit in the digitalised labour market

Latest News

  1. Nato and US urge Russia to back off on Ukraine
  2. Future EU platform seeks to 'stay clean' of hate speech
  3. Denmark threatens Syria deportations amid EU concerns
  4. MEPs raise concerns on vaccine 'travel certificates'
  5. Will Romania be EU's Green Deal laggard?
  6. Muslims, Ramadan, and myths facing 'European civilisation'
  7. Europe & Africa - rebuilding the future
  8. How the pandemic became an EU goldmine for crime

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us