Saturday

22nd Jul 2017

May to sketch out Brexit to EU leaders

  • UK prime minister May will attend her first EU summit in Brussels (Photo: Reuters)

UK prime minister Theresa May will tell EU leaders on Thursday (20 October) how she foresees Brexit, but without going into much detail.

May will attend her first EU summit, where on Thursday evening she is expected to give an outline of the political situation in the UK and preparation of her country's exit from the European Union.

Thank you for reading EUobserver!

Subscribe now and get 40% off for an annual subscription. Sale ends soon.

  1. €90 per year. Use discount code EUOBS40%
  2. or €15 per month
  3. Cancel anytime

EUobserver is an independent, not-for-profit news organization that publishes daily news reports, analysis, and investigations from Brussels and the EU member states. We are an indispensable news source for anyone who wants to know what is going on in the EU.

We are mainly funded by advertising and subscription revenues. As advertising revenues are falling fast, we depend on subscription revenues to support our journalism.

For group, corporate or student subscriptions, please contact us. See also our full Terms of Use.

If you already have an account click here to login.

Fellow EU leaders are not expected to engage in a debate with her.

May herself will probably not go into details, diplomats say.

"I wouldn’t expect May to be very specific, concrete and set out a vision, where she wants to go," a senior EU diplomat said, adding that that will come when she triggers the exit procedure, article 50, towards the end of March.

Diplomats in Brussels note that May has not taken any decision on the exact relationship she would be aiming for at the end of the Brexit negotiations.

"We are at very early stages," an EU official said.

During Thursday's dinner, EU leaders might ask questions of May but are not expected to engage in a debate. EU Council chief Donald Tusk would prefer to have that discussion among the 27 leaders.

Tusk recently said in a speech there was only one alternative to "hard Brexit", which is to stay in the EU, but diplomats say May is expected to make clear that this will not happen.

"Brexit means a fundamental change, people are coming to terms with it," the diplomat said.

May will also hold bilateral meetings, but diplomats did not want to go into detail with whom she will meet on the sidelines of the summit.

She will have a working lunch with European Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker.

While May has already met Tusk and the president of the European Parliament, Martin Schulz, it will be her first opportunity to discuss "the agenda and potential structure of the negotiations" with Juncker, the diplomat said.

Experts and diplomats tasked with preparing for negotiations with the UK in Brussels at the EU Commission and the EU Council have been screening EU rules to identify key points, where the UK and the bloc need to talk.

The Conservative leader said she would trigger Article 50 before the end of March, which is when the EU will celebrate the 60th anniversary of Rome treaty, its founding document.

Tusk warns UK on harsh realities of Brexit

EU Council chief Donald Tusk told London there will be no winners from Brexit, and no compromise on freedom of movement, yet held out an olive branch for the future.

May: Brexit is 'quiet revolution'

The British prime minister concluded the Tory party conference in the UK by pledging to regain control of immigration and by taking a swipe at pro-EU elites.

British MPs get chance to shape Brexit strategy

British prime minister Theresa May continued to talk tough on Brexit in a parliament debate on Wednesday, but left room for MPs to prevent a future trade war with the EU.

Column / Brexit Briefing

The City is right to be worried

By promising to prioritise migration control in Brexit talks, prime minister Theresa May has given a clear signal that she will prioritise provincial England over bankers.

EU urges UK to clarify its Brexit positions

EU and UK negotiators presented their Brexit positions to identify common grounds this week, but that was made difficult by the scarcity of UK position papers.

News in Brief

  1. Polish parliament adopts controversial justice reform
  2. GMO opt-out plan unlikely to go anywhere in 2017
  3. Slovak PM threatens to boycott inferior food
  4. France takes Google's 'right to be forgotten' to EU court
  5. Turkey accuses German companies of supporting terror
  6. Israel's Netanyahu caught calling EU 'crazy'
  7. UK does not collect enough data to expel EU nationals
  8. Polish president threatens to veto justice reform

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. European Jewish CongressJean-Marie Le Pen Faces Trial for Oven Comments About Jewish Singer
  2. ACCAAnnounces Belt & Road Research at Shanghai Conference
  3. ECPAFood waste in the field can double without crop protection. #WithOrWithout #pesticides
  4. EU2017EEEstonia Allocates €1 Million to Alleviate Migratory Pressure From Libya in Italy
  5. Dialogue PlatformFethullah Gulen's Message on the Anniversary of the Coup Attempt in Turkey
  6. Martens CentreWeeding out Fake News: An Approach to Social Media Regulation
  7. European Jewish CongressEJC Concerned by Normalisation of Antisemitic Tropes in Hungary
  8. Counter BalanceOut for Summer Episode 1: How the EIB Sweeps a Development Fiasco Under the Rug
  9. CESICESI to Participate in Sectoral Social Dialogue Committee on Postal Services
  10. ILGA-EuropeMalta Keeps on Rocking: Marriage Equality on Its Way
  11. European Friends of ArmeniaEuFoA Director and MEPs Comment on the Recent Conflict Escalation in Nagorno-Karabakh
  12. EU2017EEEstonian Presidency Kicks off Youth Programme With Coding Summer School

Latest News

  1. Dutch coalition talks lengthiest in 40 years
  2. Polish parliament steps up showdown with EU
  3. EU urges UK to clarify its Brexit positions
  4. Law expert: direct EU powers have become too complicated
  5. Winter is here for Spitzenkandidat, but he'll survive
  6. Mafia money pollutes the EU economy
  7. Central Europe should be wary of Brexit stopping
  8. Poland's 'July coup' and what it means for the judiciary