Tuesday

12th Dec 2017

Investigation

VW website to inform European consumers about cheating

  • VW promises to "inform customers online via a single, clear and transparent multilingual website" (Photo: Brett Levin)

Volkswagen will set up a single website to inform European consumers about cars equipped with cheating software, the carmaker told the European Commission in a letter seen by this website.

Francisco Garcia Sanz, member of the company's board of management, wrote that the company would “reinforce communication towards our customers via personal contacts within our dealership and in direct communication with the Volkswagen Group”.

Thank you for reading EUobserver!

Subscribe now for a 30 day free trial.

  1. €150 per year
  2. or €15 per month
  3. Cancel anytime

EUobserver is an independent, not-for-profit news organization that publishes daily news reports, analysis, and investigations from Brussels and the EU member states. We are an indispensable news source for anyone who wants to know what is going on in the EU.

We are mainly funded by advertising and subscription revenues. As advertising revenues are falling fast, we depend on subscription revenues to support our journalism.

For group, corporate or student subscriptions, please contact us. See also our full Terms of Use.

If you already have an account click here to login.

“We will also inform customers online via a single, clear and transparent multilingual website on which all pertinent information will be communicated directly from the Volkswagen Group,” he wrote.

The firm also repeated a promise to inform all customers by the end of this year and “to have all cars repaired by autumn 2017”.

The letter was dated Friday 23 September and addressed to EU consumer affairs commissioner Vera Jourova.

It came after Jourova and Garcia Sanz had met in Brussels on Wednesday.

Following the meeting, the commission announced VW had committed to an EU-wide action plan.

In his letter, VW executive Garcia told Jourova the company “fully commits to what has been agreed” on Wednesday, writing that it “is offering a comprehensive and transparent action plan”.

Accelerating, one year later

“The fair treatment of European consumers, in full respect of EU consumer legislation is of pivotal interest for us,” he wrote, adding that VW “has committed to accelerating” the process to bring diesel cars into conformity of EU law.

The VW scandal, which involved emissions cheating by models of the brands Volkswagen, Skoda, Seat, and Audi, became public a year ago.

While most of the affected cars are driving around in Europe, it is US consumers who have been offered financial compensation.

It is also US authorities that have been threatening to slap “substantial penalties” on VW for breaking the law, while no European authority has yet indicted the German industrial giant.

VW has set up websites about “the diesel issue” in some EU countries, but according to the EU commission, the quality of information varies too much.

“We have had conversations with all the consumer organisations from all over Europe and one of the main worries by consumer organisations was that customers are not informed in the same way, that it is not transparent enough, and that these things take too much time,” said commission spokesman Christian Wigand on Friday.

“In a first step, this is being addressed now,” said Wigand. “This is a positive step, but of course we will continue to follow this up and to closely monitor the outcome.”

Civil society organisations however, said they were disappointed at the announcement of the action plan last week.

VW: EU's action plan is 'nothing new'

Consumer affairs commissioner Jourova said Volkswagen has "committed to an EU-wide action plan", but the promise contains little news value according to the carmaker itself.

EU urges consumer groups to go after VW

European consumer groups met in Brussels to discuss strategy and tactics on how to have Volkswagen Group compensate owners of cars with cheating software.

VW 'partially' delivers on EU-wide plan

German carmaker had promised the EU that all its citizens who own a diesel car with cheating software would be informed by the end of the year, but now it says it needs more time.

News in Brief

  1. EU to Israel: Don't expect us to move embassies
  2. EU Commission condemns anti-semitic 'Jerusalem' protests
  3. Ministers have 'lots of questions' on new CAP plans
  4. Commission: Brexit agreement is 'deal between gentlemen'
  5. 25 EU states sign defence cooperation pact
  6. Netanyahu wants 'hardy' talks with EU on Jerusalem
  7. French centre-right elects new leader
  8. Germany and UK increase arms sales

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. ACCACFOs Risk Losing Relevance If They Do Not Embrace Technology
  2. UNICEFMake the Digital World Safer for Children & Increase Access for the Most Disadvantaged
  3. European Jewish CongressWelcomes Recognition of Jerusalem as the Capital of Israel and Calls on EU States to Follow Suit
  4. Mission of China to the EUChina and EU Boost Innovation Cooperation Under Horizon 2020
  5. European Gaming & Betting AssociationJuncker’s "Political" Commission Leaves Gambling Reforms to the Court
  6. AJC Transatlantic InstituteAJC Applauds U.S. Recognition of Jerusalem as Israel’s Capital City
  7. EU2017EEEU Telecom Ministers Reached an Agreement on the 5G Roadmap
  8. European Friends of ArmeniaEU-Armenia Relations in the CEPA Era: What's Next?
  9. Mission of China to the EU16+1 Cooperation Injects New Vigour Into China-EU Ties
  10. EPSUEU Blacklist of Tax Havens Is a Sham
  11. EU2017EERole of Culture in Building Cohesive Societies in Europe
  12. ILGA EuropeCongratulations to Austria - Court Overturns Barriers to Equal Marriage

Latest News

  1. Alignment with EU is 'last resort', May tells MPs
  2. Iceland: further from EU membership than ever
  3. Israel presses Jerusalem claim in EU capital
  4. From dark coal toward a brighter future
  5. UK casts doubt on EU deal in 'bizarre' twist
  6. Romania wants EU signal on Schengen membership
  7. Germany says China using LinkedIn to recruit informants
  8. No chance of expanding EU warrant crime list