Monday

6th Jul 2020

EU mulls post-Brexit budget options

  • Oettinger said there would have to be cuts in the next budget period (Photo: ec.europa.eu)

The European Commission has unveiled a reflection paper on the future EU budget, amid concerns that the departure of the UK - a net contributor - would stretch the current resources.

"We won't have the UK with us any more, but they were net payers ... so we will have a gap of €10 billion to €11 billion a year," EU budget chief Gunther Oettinger told a news conference in Brussels on Wednesday (28 June), referring to the fact that Britain paid more into the budget than it got back.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Support quality EU news

Get instant access to all articles — and 20 years of archives. 14-day free trial.

... or subscribe as a group

At €150 billion, the EU budget is relatively small if compared to the US federal one, where 2016 spending was $3.9 trillion (€3.4 trillion).

Member states send roughly one percent of their general national income to Brussels, whereas Washington gets roughly 20 percent of the income of federal states.

Government contributions account for about 80 percent of the total budget. The rest comes from customs duties and a carbon emissions trading system.

Brexit comes just as the EU has been tasked with extra work by its member states: stronger border control, combatting terrorism, and forming a defence union.

“We can either spend less or find new revenues,” Oettinger said.

He put forward ideas for what such streams could be.

UK holiday makers could have to pay €5 each time they travel to the EU after their country leaves the bloc.

The EU could also introduce a tax on financial transactions, electricity, motor fuel or corporations, if member states agree..

But the EU will also have to make cuts and shift priorities to make ends meet, Oettinger warned.

In order to stimulate a broader discussion on what to keep and what to slash, the commission set out five possible scenarios for the future budget, with options ranging from carrying on as usual to far-reaching changes with less support to agriculture and cohesion policy, which currently take more than 70 percent of the money.

While member states are generally unwilling to pay more into the budget, it is likely that proposals to cut funding to agriculture or other programmes will turn out to be controversial.

The paper also questions the length of the budget period, which is currently runs over a seven-year span. This could be shortened to five years, to coincide with the mandates of the European Parliament and the commission.

Another proposal on the table is whether one should introduce conditionality on EU funds, so as to stop them from going to countries that violate the rule of law or refuse to take refugees.

When asked if he would support linking funds with such democratic conditions, Oettinger said he was “entirely open to the result to be achieved”, and welcomed a discussion on the matter.

Member states, the European Parliament and civil society will now be asked to discuss the five scenarios.

Their views will feed into the proposal for the next long-term budget, which will start running in 2021. The commission will present this budget bill in the middle of next year.

Brexit would already eliminate the rebates enjoyed by member states such as Denmark and Sweden, Oettinger said.

The budget could also be augmented by fines, such as the recent ones against Apple and Google, who were found to be in breach of EU antitrust rules and charged with paying billions in fines.

But these fines would take many years to end up in the EU coffers, because of lengthy appeal processes and Oettiinger said it was not possible to count on such income to finance EU policies.

UK visitors to pay into EU budget after Brexit

The EU Commission says extra revenue generated from a new visa-free travel scheme, to launch in 2020, would go to the EU budget, reducing member state contributions.

UK leaves fishing convention amid Brexit talks

The UK announced it would leave the London fisheries convention, which allows mutual fishing close to the coast, arguing that it is taking back control of its waters. But Brussels warns: Brexit talks will decide that.

Interview

Poland ready to be EU budget net contributor

Poland would accept increasing its contribution, but will oppose any politicisation of EU funds, says its deputy minister of economic development.

Juncker pushes for bigger post-Brexit EU budget

Europe is worth 'more than a cup of coffee a day', the EU Commission president said, in favour of a bigger EU budget as the UK leaves and takes its share of the budget contribution with it.

News in Brief

  1. EU grants Remdesivir conditional authorisation
  2. French prime minister and government resign
  3. France lied on Nato naval clash, Turkey claims
  4. EU highlights abuses in recent Russia vote
  5. Belgium bids to host EU mask stockpile
  6. France shamed on refugees by European court
  7. French and Dutch police take down criminal phone network
  8. EU launches infringement case on Covid-19 cancelled trips

Coronavirus

EU leaders to reconvene in July on budget and recovery

Most EU leaders want an agreement before the summer break, but the Dutch PM, leading the 'Frugal Four', warned there might not even be a deal then. But the ECB's Christian Lagarde has warned of a "dramatic" economic fall.

Coronavirus

EU leaders seek to first narrow differences at summit

EU leaders on Friday will share their takes - online - on the €750bn recovery and €1.1 trillion budget plans, before they try to seal the deal at one or two likely head-to-head meetings in July.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersNEW REPORT: Eight in ten people are concerned about climate change
  2. UNESDAHow reducing sugar and calories in soft drinks makes the healthier choice the easy choice
  3. Nordic Council of MinistersGreen energy to power Nordic start after Covid-19
  4. European Sustainable Energy WeekThis year’s EU Sustainable Energy Week (EUSEW) will be held digitally!
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic states are fighting to protect gender equality during corona crisis
  6. UNESDACircularity works, let’s all give it a chance

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us