Sunday

13th Jun 2021

EU to launch Ukraine anti-corruption scheme

The European Union is about to unveil a comprehensive anti-corruption programme for Ukraine in a last effort to fight back against graft.

According to one EU source involved in the planning, EU commissioner for enlargement Johannes Hahn will make the announcement on Friday (16 September), during the Yalta European Strategy Annual Meeting (YES) in Kyiv.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Become an expert on Europe

Get instant access to all articles — and 20 years of archives. 14-day free trial.

... or subscribe as a group

A commission spokesperson confirmed that Mr Hahn will attend the conference, but wouldn't go into details.

"Commissioner Hahn will meet a number of ministers during the course of his two-day visit in order to discuss progress across a range of reform commitments made by Ukraine. He will visit EU funded projects and will attend the YES conference," the spokesperson said.

The anti-corruption scheme is worth €16 million, will take off on 1 January 2017 and span three years.

It will be based on four pillars: building and developing institutions to fight corruption; strengthening parliamentary oversight; working with local governments; and supporting civil society organisations and investigative journalists, who are already at the forefront of the battle.

The programme will operate from an EU office in Kiev and it will be implemented by Denmark. The world’s least corrupt country, according to Transparency International’s index, hopes to lend credibility to the project. The same ranking puts Ukraine at 130th position of 168 - making it the most corrupt country in Europe.

The Baltic states, Poland and Romania may also contribute, the EU source said, by sharing their experiences of transition from post-communist to democratic states.

This winter will mark three years since the Maidan revolution, which ousted Ukraine's corrupt president Viktor Yanukovych.

But corruption still permeates everyday life, bureaucracy and politics, according to the official.

That has stalled a deal for Ukrainians to get visa-free travel in the EU.

The EU’s move comes as the Netherlands is likely to relaunch the debate on Ukraine’s trade-association deal with the EU.

The pact was voted down earlier this year in a referendum, and the Dutch government has since ignored the issue.

But one EU official told this website the Dutch were likely to seek to settle the matter soon so that it doesn’t interfere with the next general elections, which will take place no later than 15 March.

Ukraine visa deal hangs in the balance

A row over the introduction of a computer system for officials to declare their interests threatens to torpedo Ukraine's visa deal with the EU.

Dutch might not ratify Ukraine treaty, PM says

Rutte said changing the text or not ratifying it at all were two options after Dutch people voted against it in a referendum. Treaty would likely survive in another form.

West shows $1bn of faith in Ukraine

The IMF has shown faith in Ukraine’s reform efforts by disbursing more money. A new ceasefire deal has also given fresh hope of peace.

Denmark leads Ukraine anti-corruption drive

The EU has unveiled an anti-corruption scheme for Ukraine, amid concerns that its officials and lawmakers are undermining a key reform in the fight against villainy.

News in Brief

  1. EU top court fast-tracks rule-of-law case to October
  2. Hungary's Fidesz wants to ban LGBTIQ content for under-18s
  3. MEPs join EU citizens on farm-animal cage ban
  4. Council of Europe urges Russia to release Navalny 'immediately'
  5. China's anti-sanctions law alarms EU businesses
  6. Airlines seek to water down EU passengers' rights
  7. EU leaders join call for further probe into Covid origins
  8. Liberal MEPs under fire over Babiš abstention

Opinion

Montenegro's membership can inspire the European Dream

Today (15 December) I come to Brussels with a simple purpose: to present the credentials of my country, Montenegro, to become the next member state of the European Union, writes prime minister Zdravko Krivokapic.

Interview

Does North Macedonia really exist?

Its language and history give North Macedonia its identity for president Stevo Pendarovski, but, for Bulgaria, neither of them are real, in a dispute holding up EU enlargement.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersNineteen demands by Nordic young people to save biodiversity
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersSustainable public procurement is an effective way to achieve global goals
  3. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Council enters into formal relations with European Parliament
  4. Nordic Council of MinistersWomen more active in violent extremist circles than first assumed
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersDigitalisation can help us pick up the green pace
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersCOVID19 is a wake-up call in the fight against antibiotic resistance

Latest News

  1. EU urges Poland to step back from 'legal primacy' clash
  2. Pressure builds on EU to back WTO vaccine-patent waiver
  3. EU anti-fraud agency cracked down on fake pandemic supplies
  4. MEP office expenses kept secret on dubious evidence
  5. What the EU public think of EU pesticide regulation
  6. MEPs set to take EU Commission to court on rule-of-law
  7. EU takes legal action against Germany on bonds ruling
  8. MEPs demand new EU biodiversity law by next year

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us