Sunday

23rd Jul 2017

Nato chief: EU soft power is 'no power at all'

  • Rasmussen spoke in the run-up to an EU summit on defence in December (Photo: europarl.europa.eu)

Nato head Anders Fogh Rasmussen has said there cannot be a credible EU foreign policy without the military means to back it up.

"We Europeans must understand that soft power alone is really no power at all. Without hard capabilities to back up its diplomacy, Europe will lack credibility and influence," he told MEPs on the European Parliament's foreign affairs committee in Brussels on Monday (6 May).

Thank you for reading EUobserver!

Subscribe now and get 40% off for an annual subscription. Sale ends soon.

  1. €90 per year. Use discount code EUOBS40%
  2. or €15 per month
  3. Cancel anytime

EUobserver is an independent, not-for-profit news organization that publishes daily news reports, analysis, and investigations from Brussels and the EU member states. We are an indispensable news source for anyone who wants to know what is going on in the EU.

We are mainly funded by advertising and subscription revenues. As advertising revenues are falling fast, we depend on subscription revenues to support our journalism.

For group, corporate or student subscriptions, please contact us. See also our full Terms of Use.

If you already have an account click here to login.

"If European nations do not make a firm commitment to invest in security and defence, then all talk about a strengthened European defence and security policy will just be hot air," he added.

Twenty one out of the 27 EU countries are also Nato members.

Rasmussen said they lack "transport planes, air-to-air refuelling and intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance assets."

He noted that, given the financial crisis, it is "too expensive for any individual [EU] country" to buy the hardware that Nato needs Europe to have.

He also indicated that European countries are too dove-ish in their approach to foreign crises.

"We must also have the political will to use them [military means]. To deal with security challenges on Europe's doorstep. To help manage crises further away that might affect us here at home," he said.

Rasmussen spoke in the run-up to an EU summit on defence in December - the first one since the financial crisis erupted in 2008.

His remarks on EU foreign policy prompted questions on whether he is interested in taking EU foreign service chief Catherine Ashton's job when she departs next year.

"I haven't started thinking about the next step," he said, referring to his own career.

He envisaged EU-level security co-operation with Nato as a mixture of police missions and diplomacy.

Taking the Western Balkans as an example, he said: "Nato has shown its capacity to act quickly and in high intensity crises, while the European Union is able to deploy a wide range of civilian and military expertise to help rebuild nations."

He commended Ashton on her recent diplomatic breakthrough in helping Belgrade and Pristina to end a frozen conflict in north Kosovo.

But he added: "Both parties wanted assurance that Nato would guarantee the security to implement the agreement."

MEPs also quizzed Rasmussen about Syria.

The civil war saw two new developments in recent days.

Over the weekend, Israeli jets struck several Syrian targets, including a military complex near Damascus. Reports say they killed more than 40 soldiers and that they did it to stop Syrian weapons getting into the hands of Israel's fiercest enemy, the Hezbollah militia in Lebanon.

A UN investigator, Carla Del Ponte, also told Swiss TV on Sunday "there are strong, concrete suspicions" that Syrian rebels have used Sarin gas, a banned chemical weapon.

The developments saw the Russian foreign ministry ring the alarm on Monday.

"We are seriously concerned about the signs that global public opinion is being prepared for a possible armed intervention in the Syrian conflict," its foreign ministry spokesman told Russian media.

For his part, Rasmussen in Brussels repeated the long-standing Nato line on Syria.

He told MEPs there will be no Nato intervention because there is no UN mandate and because the conflict is too "complex." He also said the only way out is a "political solution."

He declined to comment on the Israeli strikes and he claimed he knows no more than what he reads in the papers about chemical weapons.

Nato has deployed US, German and Dutch "Patriot" anti-missile defence systems on Nato member Turkey's border with Syria.

But Rasmussen noted he has "no indications" of hostile "activity" in the Patriot-covered zone.

Juncker: Death penalty will end Turkey's EU bid

Turkish president Erdogan said he would reinstate capital punishment, for people behind last year's failed military coup. But European Commission president Juncker says the move would end Turkey's bid to join the EU.

Cyprus talks up in the air

A week after the failure of negotiations to reunite the islands, Greek Cypriots are calling on Turkish Cypriots to reaffirm their commitment to the process.

News in Brief

  1. Polish parliament adopts controversial justice reform
  2. GMO opt-out plan unlikely to go anywhere in 2017
  3. Slovak PM threatens to boycott inferior food
  4. France takes Google's 'right to be forgotten' to EU court
  5. Turkey accuses German companies of supporting terror
  6. Israel's Netanyahu caught calling EU 'crazy'
  7. UK does not collect enough data to expel EU nationals
  8. Polish president threatens to veto justice reform

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. European Jewish CongressJean-Marie Le Pen Faces Trial for Oven Comments About Jewish Singer
  2. ACCAAnnounces Belt & Road Research at Shanghai Conference
  3. ECPAFood waste in the field can double without crop protection. #WithOrWithout #pesticides
  4. EU2017EEEstonia Allocates €1 Million to Alleviate Migratory Pressure From Libya in Italy
  5. Dialogue PlatformFethullah Gulen's Message on the Anniversary of the Coup Attempt in Turkey
  6. Martens CentreWeeding out Fake News: An Approach to Social Media Regulation
  7. European Jewish CongressEJC Concerned by Normalisation of Antisemitic Tropes in Hungary
  8. Counter BalanceOut for Summer Episode 1: How the EIB Sweeps a Development Fiasco Under the Rug
  9. CESICESI to Participate in Sectoral Social Dialogue Committee on Postal Services
  10. ILGA-EuropeMalta Keeps on Rocking: Marriage Equality on Its Way
  11. European Friends of ArmeniaEuFoA Director and MEPs Comment on the Recent Conflict Escalation in Nagorno-Karabakh
  12. EU2017EEEstonian Presidency Kicks off Youth Programme With Coding Summer School

Latest News

  1. Dutch coalition talks lengthiest in 40 years
  2. Polish parliament steps up showdown with EU
  3. EU urges UK to clarify its Brexit positions
  4. Law expert: direct EU powers have become too complicated
  5. Winter is here for Spitzenkandidat, but he'll survive
  6. Mafia money pollutes the EU economy
  7. Central Europe should be wary of Brexit stopping
  8. Poland's 'July coup' and what it means for the judiciary