Thursday

17th Oct 2019

Russia asks Interpol to track Magnitsky campaigner

  • Browder on the campaign trial at the Davos forum in Switzerland (Photo: davos.ch)

The diminutive US-born businessman and his entourage of one or two assistants has become a familiar sight in the European Parliament in Brussels.

Bill Browder visits the EU capital several times a year to make the case for EU sanctions on Russian officials linked to the alleged murder of his former employee, whistleblower accountant Sergei Magnitsky.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Support quality EU news

Get instant access to all articles — and 18 year's of archives. 30 days free trial.

... or join as a group

He is also a frequent visitor in Berlin, The Hague, Paris, Rome, Stockholm and Warsaw.

But he is a wanted man in Russia, which last month issued a warrant for his arrest on charges that he illegally obtained shares in its national energy champion, Gazprom, 15 years ago.

He is also wanted in other ways.

Following a series of anonymous death threats, he now lives in London under the protection of the Special Branch of the British police.

When he travels, the UK liaises with security services in other European countries to keep him safe.

But if the Kremlin gets its way, his travels could come to an end.

The Russian interior ministry on 7 May filed a request with Interpol, the international police body in Lyon, France, to issue a so-called All Points Bulletin (APB) on Browder.

If it agrees, authorities in all 190 Interpol member states will be obliged to alert Russia on his movements, enabling it to request his detention and extradition.

The police body will consider Russia's demand at a meeting on Thursday (23 May).

According to article 3 of the Interpol charter: "It is strictly forbidden for the organisation to undertake any intervention or activities of a political, military, religious or racial character."

Reacting to the Browder request, Interpol issued a statement to press on Monday saying "This prohibition is taken extremely seriously."

But it has not stopped the police body from honouring dubious requests in the past.

One person currently on an Interpol notice is Petr Silaev, a Russian activist who in 2010 took part in a campaign to stop a highway being built through the Khimki forest near Moscow.

He fled Russia following a police crackdown and obtained asylum in Finland.

But when he visited Spain in August 2012, he was arrested by Spanish counter-terrorist police.

He spent eight days in prison and was unable to go home for six months while a Spanish court considered Russia's extradition demand (which it later rejected).

Meanwhile, Browder's alleged crime on Gazprom is prima facie questionable.

Like many other foreign investors, his firm, Hermitage Capital, bought Gazprom shares on the open market and declared its purchases to the Russian state.

It faced no punitive action at the time.

But Russia is now citing a 1997 decree on Gazprom restrictions - which contained no criminal liability to begin with and which was abolished in 2007 - as the basis for its prosecution.

"The allegations of the Russian interior ministry are a clear smokescreen to conceal the political attack ordered by Russian President Putin on Mr Browder in retaliation for Mr Browder's advocacy for the Magnitsky sanctions," Hermitage Capital said in a statement on Monday.

"This will become a key test of whether Interpol's systems are robust enough to fend off such obvious misuse," it added.

Column

These are the crunch issues for the 2019-2024 EU commission

These developments will largely determine who will be running the world in the coming decades and perhaps generations. If the Europeans can't find an answer over the five years, they will be toast. And we haven't even mentioned climate change.

Opinion

Time to pay attention to Belarus

Belarus may be hosting the European Games, but Vladimir Putin is not playing games when it comes to Belarus' independence. The West needs to get serious as well.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersBrussels welcomes Nordic culture
  2. UNESDAUNESDA appoints Nicholas Hodac as Director General
  3. UNESDASoft drinks industry co-signs Circular Plastics Alliance Declaration
  4. FEANIEngineers Europe Advisory Group: Building the engineers of the future
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersNew programme studies infectious diseases and antibiotic resistance
  6. UNESDAUNESDA reduces added sugars 11.9% between 2015-2017
  7. International Partnership for Human RightsEU-Uzbekistan Human Rights Dialogue: EU to raise key fundamental rights issues
  8. Nordic Council of MinistersNo evidence that social media are harmful to young people
  9. Nordic Council of MinistersCanada to host the joint Nordic cultural initiative 2021
  10. Vote for the EU Sutainable Energy AwardsCast your vote for your favourite EUSEW Award finalist. You choose the winner of 2019 Citizen’s Award.
  11. Nordic Council of MinistersEducation gets refugees into work
  12. Counter BalanceSign the petition to help reform the EU’s Bank

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us