Sunday

9th Aug 2020

MEPs vote for transparency, despite EPP secret ballot

  • Many MEPs in favour of transparency hold up signs to publicly show their support, since the ballot was held in secret (Photo: Javor Benedek)

Efforts by German centre-right MEPs to block greater transparency in the European Parliament via a secret ballot ended in defeat on Thursday (31 January).

The plenary in Brussels instead backed calls to require leading MEPs to disclose to the public their meetings with lobbyists.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Support quality EU news

Get instant access to all articles — and 20 years of archives. 14-day free trial.

... or subscribe as a group

It will also allow all MEPs who volunteer to do so, to publish their monthly expenses report on the website of the parliament.

For the German European People's Party delegation, the most contentious issue had been offering up a legislative paper trail of meetings, which they claim infringes on their rights to work as they see fit.

But that German argument fell flat when MEPs, many of whom were holding up signs to publicly show their votes since the ballot was held in secret, backed the pro-transparency amendment attached to a rules of procedure report by British centre-left MEP Richard Corbett.

"Amazingly, the centre-right EPP group forced a secret vote on these new transparency rules – so as to hide that many of their members will vote against publishing details of their meetings with lobbyists and big business," said Corbett.

"Fortunately, their tactics failed and those fighting for more transparency won."

Some 380 MEPs voted in favour of transparency against 224 with 26 abstentions.

The proposals also "encourage" MEPs to publish online any meetings they hold with any interest representatives.

Such demands followed the 2011 cash-for-amendment scandal, when three MEPs were caught accepting large sums of money to table amendments from British undercover journalists posing as corporate lobbyists.

One of those MEPs, disgraced centre-right Austrian Ernst Strasser, had been charging up to €100,000 a year for his services to help shape EU legislation.

Another two socialist MEPs, Romania's Adrian Severin and Zoran Thaler of Slovenia, were also implicated in similar affairs.

But eight years later, the European Parliament still has not fully endorsed a plan to create a mandatory joint-transparency register that covers all MEPs.

Instead, Thursday's vote only requires committee chairs and others who draft reports to publish their meetings with lobbyists.

Another issue is whether the European Commission is now willing to restart negotiations with the European parliament to create a mandatory joint-transparency register, that also covers member states in the Council.

"The European parliament can still approve a new agreement between the institutions, until 17 April. Otherwise, the new parliament would have to work out a new negotiating position after the European elections," said German Green MEP Sven Giegold.

Many of the approved changes are expected to be adopted next month.

Razor-edge victory for more lobbying transparency at EP

New rules to force MEPs chairing committees or drafting reports to publish meetings with registered lobbyists took a step closer to reality. The measure was narrowly backed 11 to 10 at the constitutional affairs committee but still needs plenary approval.

Lobby register transparency talks collapse

Efforts to set up a better transparency register for lobbyists have collapsed after two years of talks. The impasse revolves around the European Commission's insistence that the register also become mandatory for the European Parliament and Council.

EUobserved

Weber's 'black box' dilemma

Under Manfred Weber's leadership, the European People's Party in February forced through a secret ballot trying to derail more transparency at the European Parliament. Now, Weber is wondering why people perceive the EU as a black box.

EU transparency on lobbyist meetings still piecemeal

Small steps are being made to reveal who is lobbying who within the EU. But the approach is basically haphazard and piecemeal - meaning the public remains largely in the dark and unable to truly scrutinise the influencers.

News in Brief

  1. Germany breached rights of Madeleine McCann suspect
  2. EU offers trade perks to Lebanon
  3. Germany charges ex-Audi chiefs on emissions cheating
  4. UK quarantines Belgium, as European infections climb
  5. Bulgaria's Borissov mulls resignation
  6. EU prolongs anti-dumping duties on Chinese steel
  7. Swedish economy contracted less during April to June
  8. EU offers help to Lebanon after port explosion

Opinion

Why so few women in EU missions?

Angela Merkel is only the seventh woman to chair the Council of the European Union's meetings. And in 2020 there is no woman leading any of the current 11 European civilian missions (let alone the six military operations).

Commission chief under fire for Croatia campaign video

EU Commission president Ursula von der Leyen recorded a video in support of Croatia's ruling party, which the EU executive said was in her "personal capacity" - and admits it was a "mistake" that this was not made clear.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. UNESDANext generation Europe should be green and circular
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersNEW REPORT: Eight in ten people are concerned about climate change
  3. UNESDAHow reducing sugar and calories in soft drinks makes the healthier choice the easy choice
  4. Nordic Council of MinistersGreen energy to power Nordic start after Covid-19
  5. European Sustainable Energy WeekThis year’s EU Sustainable Energy Week (EUSEW) will be held digitally!
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic states are fighting to protect gender equality during corona crisis

Latest News

  1. EU wary of violence in Belarus election
  2. Iraqis paid €2,000 each agree to leave Greece
  3. EU's most sustainable islands are Danish 'Sunshine Islands'
  4. Worrying rows over future EU chemicals policy
  5. Rainbow flag protesters charged by Polish police
  6. An open letter to the EPP on end of Hungary's press freedom
  7. Renew Europe has a plan to combat gender-violence
  8. Why EU beats US on green pandemic recovery

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us