Thursday

24th Sep 2020

Amnesty International shames EU handling of Libya refugees

  • Sub-Saharan migrants are targeted as Gaddafi loyalists in Libya (Photo: IOM)

EU countries have "shamefully" failed to help some 5,000 African refugees who fled the violence directed against them in Libya and are now stranded on the Egyptian and Tunisian borders, humanitarian watchdog Amnesty International said Monday (19 September).

"We have witnessed an abysmal response to the plight of displaced refugees on Europe’s doorstep," said Nicolas Beger, head of Amnesty International's European branch.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Support quality EU news

Get instant access to all articles — and 20 years of archives. 14-day free trial.

... or subscribe as a group

"This failure is particularly glaring given that some European countries, by participating in Nato operations in Libya, have been party to the very conflict that has been one of the main causes of the involuntary movement of people," he explained after Amnesty teams went on fact-finding missions to Libya.

Approximately 1,000 people, including Eritreans, Ethiopians, Iraqis, Ivoriens, Palestinians, Somalis and Sudanese, are stranded at Egypt's Saloum border post, sleeping in makeshift tents made of blankets and plastic sheets.

Meanwhile in Choucha camp in Tunisia, around 3,800 refugees live in an isolated area of desert where conditions are harsh.

One Sudanese man told Amnesty International: "Humans need dignity and freedom. But there is no freedom in Sudan and no dignity here."

Australia, Canada and the USA have offered to resettle some of the refugees stranded at Libya’s borders. But only eight European countries have offered to help, between them offering fewer than 700 slots.

Meanwhile, thousands of refugees have attempted to reach Europe by sea, a perilous journey believed to have claimed more than 1500 lives since the start of the conflict in Libya.

"EU home affairs ministers must urgently address the resettlement issue – they can start by putting it prominently on the agenda of the justice and home affairs council on 22 September," Beger said.

When the rebellion against Gaddafi began earlier this year, hundreds of thousands of people anxious to leave the insecurity of Libya fled to neighbouring Tunisia. The majority of them have since been repatriated back to their country of origin. But sub-Saharan Africans cannot go home due to the violence in their countries.

Meanwhile, many of those who have not managed to get out of Libya are suspected of being Gaddafi loyalists and vulnerable to racist attacks, the watchdog says.

When Benghazi and other eastern cities first fell under the control of the National Transitional Council (NTC), anti-Gaddafi forces carried out house raids, killings and other violent attacks against of anyone suspected to be a mercenary for the dictator.

Amnesty International last week issued a special report calling on the NTC to stop the abuse and protect sub-Saharan people from reprisal attacks.

In response to Amnesty's findings, the NTC said it will adhere to human rights principles and claimed the violations perpetrated by rebel fighters were "limited".

Italy rescues 500 Libya refugees from shipwreck

More than 500 refugees who travelled from Libya, mostly sub-Saharan Africans, were rescued early Sunday morning after their overloaded boat sank a dozen miles from the Italian coast of Lampedusa.

News in Brief

  1. Belgium: masks no longer mandatory from October
  2. Report: China built 380 Muslim internment camps
  3. Belgian government formation in final phase
  4. Lukashenko sworn in at secret ceremony
  5. Study: No-deal Brexit more costly than corona for UK
  6. Polish miners in underground protest against energy plan
  7. EU animal farming emits more CO2 than cars
  8. Navalny leaves Berlin hospital after poisoning attempt

EUobserver under attack in wider battle for EU free press

If EU citizens want to know the truth, then journalists need protection from malicious litigation, as EUobserver joined the list of targets, over an article about the late Maltese journalist Daphne Caruana Galizia.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Council meets Belarusian opposition leader Svetlana Tichanovskaja
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Region to invest DKK 250 million in green digitalised business sector
  3. UNESDAReducing packaging waste – a huge opportunity for circularity
  4. Nordic Council of MinistersCOVID-19 halts the 72nd Session of the Nordic Council in Iceland
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersCivil society a key player in integration
  6. UNESDANext generation Europe should be green and circular

Latest News

  1. EU migration pact to deter asylum
  2. 'Era of EU naivety ends', MEP pledges on foreign meddling
  3. Anti-mask protesters pose challenge for EU authorities
  4. EU 'failed' to safeguard civic freedoms during pandemic
  5. The corruption fuelling the Bulgaria protests
  6. EU countries stuck on rule of law-budget link
  7. EU states struggle to better sync Covid-19 measures
  8. EP groups drop homophobe from Sakharov prize

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us