Wednesday

20th Mar 2019

MEPs boycott negotiations with member states in Schengen row

  • The decision to suspend negotiations on justice and home affairs issues came 27 years after the Schengen agreement was signed on 14 June 1985 (Photo: European Commission)

The European Parliament decided on Thursday (14 June) to boycott negotiations with member states on five home affairs legislative packages until a “satisfactory outcome” on how rules governing the EU borderless area are achieved.

“The conference of presidents has decided not to take any further action, not to negotiate with Council until an agreement has been reached with Council on the matter of Schengen,” said European Parliament chief Martin Schulz in Strasbourg.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Support quality EU news

Get instant access to all articles — and 18 year's of archives. 30 days free trial.

... or join as a group

EU ministers had on 7 June decided to exclude parliament from having a say on how rules governing the Union's passport-free zone are applied.

Schulz called the decision a “slap in the face of parliamentary democracy.”

Member states want EU border law monitoring to remain a peer-to-peer exercise. Euro deputies, along with the European Commission, had insisted monitoring move to the EU-level. But the member states' decision would entitle the parliament to observer status only.

“It is without precedent that in the middle of the legislative process, one co-legislative chamber excludes the other,” said Schulz.

Green group leader Daniel Cohn-Bendit said the Parliament would “not take the Council's dirty, anti-democratic tricks on Schengen lying down”.

The Parliament has decided to remove from its July plenary session discussions and votes on Schengen governance.

Discussions scheduled on 21 June in the Parliament’s civil liberties committee on the amendment of the Schengen border code and the convention implementing the Schengen agreement have also been suspended.

It also suspended negotiations scheduled in July on judicial cooperation in criminal matters such as combating attacks against information systems.

Additionally, it is stopping talks on the European investigation order, the 2013 budget on internal security, and the EU passenger name records draft report.

None, say the Parliament, will be resolved until member states reverse their unanimous decision on Schengen.

Schulz spokesperson told EUobserver he could not specify what would happen if governments refuse to budge on their earlier decision. “We are in the start of negotiations,” he said.

For its part, the Danish EU presidency said it regrets the Parliament’s decision but will to continue to work with the institution.

So far member states have been relatively sanguine about parliament's stance.

“I hope the whole discussion will calm down. We don't want to take away any rights from MEPs, so I am sure we'll find a good dialogue,” German interior minister Hans Peter Friedrich told journalists in Berlin.

But he noted the majority of legal experts in the parliament agree with member states' decision to remove MEPs' co-decision power.

A source close to the council told EUobserver said it is unlikely member states will reverse their decision.

MEPs: Schengen row mars Danish EU presidency

Member states' decision to exclude the EU parliament from monitoring the EU's passport free area has blighted the entire Danish EU presidency, MEPs have said.

Orban rejects Weber's plea to stop anti-EU posters

Hungarian prime minister Viktor Orban has pledged to put up new anti-migrant posters - despite hopes in his centre-right EU family that he might "apologise and put an end" to the campaign.

News in Brief

  1. Merkel: I will fight to the 'last hour' for orderly Brexit
  2. EU affairs ministers demand Brexit clarity from London
  3. Nordic MEP candidates in first ever joint EU election debate
  4. UK announces EEA trade deal ahead of EU summit
  5. Four European cities among world's most expensive
  6. Violent 'yellow vest' protesters ban in Paris
  7. Russia celebrates fifth anniversary of Crimea annexation
  8. Blow for May as third vote on Brexit deal ruled out

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersLeading Nordic candidates go head-to-head in EU election debate
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersNew Secretary General: Nordic co-operation must benefit everybody
  3. Platform for Peace and JusticeMEP Kati Piri: “Our red line on Turkey has been crossed”
  4. UNICEF2018 deadliest year yet for children in Syria as war enters 9th year
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic commitment to driving global gender equality
  6. International Partnership for Human RightsMeet your defender: Rasul Jafarov leading human rights defender from Azerbaijan
  7. UNICEFUNICEF Hosts MEPs in Jordan Ahead of Brussels Conference on the Future of Syria
  8. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic talks on parental leave at the UN
  9. International Partnership for Human RightsTrial of Chechen prisoner of conscience and human rights activist Oyub Titiev continues.
  10. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic food policy inspires India to be a sustainable superpower
  11. Nordic Council of MinistersMilestone for Nordic-Baltic e-ID
  12. Counter BalanceEU bank urged to free itself from fossil fuels and take climate leadership

Latest News

  1. Have a good reason for Brexit extension, Barnier tells UK
  2. EU countries push for new rule of law surveillance
  3. EU rolls out €525m for military projects, but bars illegal tech
  4. May to seek Brexit extension amid UK 'constitutional crisis'
  5. Catalan independence trial is widening Spain's divides
  6. My plan for defending rule of law in EU
  7. Anti-corruption lawyer wins first round of Slovak elections
  8. The changing of the guards in the EU in 2019

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us