Friday

19th Jan 2018

Turkish PM in Brussels for migration talks next week

  • Turkey's PM Davutoglu is set to arrive in Brussels next week (Photo: European council)

Turkey's prime minister, Ahmet Davutoglu, is set to meet leaders from a handful of EU states ahead of an EU summit in Brussels next week.

“The prime minister will be coming to attend the like-minded countries' group meeting,” a Turkish government contact told EUobserver on Tuesday (9 February).

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A similar pre-summit meeting was held last December with Germany, Austria, Belgium, Luxembourg, Finland, Sweden, Greece, France, Portugal, Slovenia and the Netherlands at the Austrian permanent representation in Brussels.

The Turkish contact said Davutoglu would be in Brussels next Thursday (18 February) to discuss wider issues on migration at the margins of the EU summit.

His arrival will follow a separate meeting on 17 February that will set the funding priorities for projects under a €3 billion deal between the EU and Ankara on improving the lives of Syrian refugees inside Turkey.

The contact said a big chunk of the money may go towards financing education, given the some 700,000 school-aged Syrian children in Turkey.

Turkey is hoping to get visa restrictions on its nationals lifted in October. The EU wants to start returning people this summer who transited through Turkey to claim asylum in the EU but are not entitled to international protection.

Meanwhile, the European Commission will present on Wednesday (10 February) a broad overview of progress on EU migration policies in Greece, the Balkans and Turkey.

Also on Wednesday, Nato will discuss possible support for patrolling the Aegean, after the idea was raised by Germany and Turkey on Monday.

In a phone talk with German chancellor Angela Merkel on Tuesday, Greek prime minister Alexis Tsipras said he agreed on the plan on the condition that it "will concern Turkish territorial waters, and should by no means affect Greece's sovereign rights".

Greece

A week before the next EU summit, member states are also mulling the next steps on Greece.

EU states may adopt on Friday a report by the commission that criticises Greece's management of its frontiers.

If adopted, Greece will have three months to sort out the problems. Failure may push the EU to extend the time-frame for internal border checks to two years.

Greece said it would complete its five arrival screening centres known as hotspots by Monday (15 February). Greek media report some of the centres, located on the Aegean islands, are far behind schedule.

The hotspots are key to getting the stalled EU relocation plan to distribute 160,000 asylum seekers among EU states up and running.

But even then, outstanding political issues remain, with some member states, particularly in the east, reluctant to accept Muslims.

EU finalises €3bn fund for Turkey refugees

Projects can start in early 2016 after Italy dropped objections. Germany to contribute the most, after the majority of the 1 million EU-bound migrants went there last year.

EU: Turkey must do more to stop migrant flow

Arrivals from Turkey still higher than last year despite joint EU plan. "The Turkish authorities, if they really want, can do the job on the ground," the EU migration commissioner said.

Macron eyes France-UK border agreement

French president Macron wants the UK to take in more refugees as he revisits the 2003 Le Touquet agreement, which allows British border controls to take place inside French territory.

Macron eyes France-UK border agreement

French president Macron wants the UK to take in more refugees as he revisits the 2003 Le Touquet agreement, which allows British border controls to take place inside French territory.

Magazine

The asylum files: deadlock and dead-ends

The EU is reforming a number of internal asylum laws, but lack of staff, politics, and the sheer complexity of the bills means deadlines - like those announced by EU council chief Tusk - are likely to come and go.

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