Friday

9th Dec 2022

EU anti-fraud watchdog has completed Frontex probe

  • The Warsaw-based agency had a €543m budget last year, up from €6m in 2005. (Photo: Frontex)
Listen to article

The EU's anti-fraud office Olaf has finalised its year-long investigation into Europe's border and coast guard force, Frontex.

The probe was launched in January 2021 after investigators raided the offices of Frontex's executive director Fabrice Leggeri and his chief of staff, Thibauld de La Haye Jousselin.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Become an expert on Europe

Get instant access to all articles — and 20 years of archives. 14-day free trial.

... or subscribe as a group

The investigation, or investigations, that then ensued could lead to sanctions for officials at the Warsaw-based agency, but details so far are scant, and Olaf has not described the grounds on which it undertook the probe.

On Monday (21 February) Olaf offered only a brief confirmation that it had "closed an investigation concerning Frontex on 15 February 2022."

But previous press reports by EUobserver and Politico Europe have suggested the probe could be linked to human resource problems with recruitment and staff travel woes, as well as internal office harassment - not just the illegal pushbacks of migrants and asylum seekers.

The Olaf investigation is expected to be discussed by the Frontex management board later this week.

That board is composed of national police and interior ministry officials, plus two representatives from the European Commission, and is tasked "to exercise oversight over the agency," according to the EU regulation underpinning Frontex.

The board also is expected to determine the severity of sanctions, if any, and that determination could come around the beginning of March.

Olaf's director general Ville Itala is expected, on 28 February, to brief European Parliament lawmakers who are members of a budget oversight committee — but those talks will not be public.

The budget for Frontex last year was €543m, making it the EU's best funded agency.

The European Parliament had decided to reduce the size of the agency's 2022 budget by roughly €90m as a result of concerns, including the agency's failure to hire fundamental rights monitors to hold border guards accountable for possible violations of the rights of asylum seekers.

But just over a year later, it had missed that target, and others, triggering an internal spat between the agency and EU commissioner for home affairs, Ylva Johansson.

The parliament also took issue with the agency's slow response in setting up a system to make it easier for border guards to report possible wrongdoing, including violations of the rights of asylum-seekers along the EU's external border.

Separately, Frontex has come in for criticism from the European Court of Auditors, the EU's official spending watchdog, which took issue with Frontex accounting standards.

The auditors found, among other things, that the agency's operational reporting lacks information on actual costs and performance. Frontex was "its own worst enemy," the auditors said.

The European Ombudsman, an EU administrative watchdog, also has faulted Frontex for lack of transparency and for failing to set up an adequate system allowing asylum seekers to issue complaints about their treatment.

Frontex 'own worst enemy', says EU auditor

A special audit on how Frontex supports member states in cracking down on "illegal migration and cross-border crimes" has painted a bleak picture of an EU agency, whose annual budget rocketed from €19m in 2006 to €900m in 2021.

Exclusive

EU anti-fraud office launches probe into Frontex

EUobserver was tipped off about the investigation by an anonymous source, who said Olaf had raided the offices of Frontex director Fabrice Leggeri and his chef de cabinet in early December given alleged misconduct.

Exclusive

Frontex chief took €8,500 private flight to Brussels meeting

Frontex spent €8,500 to send its executive director Fabrice Leggeri on a private jet to attend an evening meeting in Brussels. The Warsaw-based agency said there were scheduling conflicts preventing him taking a commercial flight.

IT bugs haunt work of EU fraud busters

EU efforts to fight fraud have been hampered by bugs and delays in an €29m IT system meant to help manage investigations more efficiently.

Illegal pushbacks happening daily in Croatia, says NGO

More than 1,600 testimonies of alleged illegal pushbacks of migrants and refugees throughout the EU has been published, collated by the Border Violence Monitoring Network and the Left party — adding to the mounting evidence of abuse.

Frontex leadership candidates grilled by MEPs

Terezija Gras from Croatia, Dutchman Hans Leijtens, and Frontex's current interim executive director Aija Kalnaja, are all competing for a job left vacant by the resignation of Fabrice Leggeri.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersLarge Nordic youth delegation at COP15 biodiversity summit in Montreal
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersCOP27: Food systems transformation for climate action
  3. Nordic Council of MinistersThe Nordic Region and the African Union urge the COP27 to talk about gender equality
  4. International Sustainable Finance CentreJoin CEE Sustainable Finance Summit, 15 – 19 May 2023, high-level event for finance & business
  5. Friedrich Naumann Foundation European DialogueGender x Geopolitics: Shaping an Inclusive Foreign Security Policy for Europe
  6. Obama FoundationThe Obama Foundation Opens Applications for its Leaders Program in Europe

Latest News

  1. EU lets Croatia into Schengen, keeps Bulgaria and Romania out
  2. Energy crisis costs thousands of EU jobs, but industrial output stable
  3. Illegal pushbacks happening daily in Croatia, says NGO
  4. No, Bosnia and Herzegovina is not ready for the EU
  5. EU takes legal action against China over Lithuania
  6. EU Commission shoring up children's rights of same-sex parents
  7. The military-industrial complex cashing-in on the Ukraine war
  8. EU delays Hungary funds decision, as Budapest vetoes Ukraine aid

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. EFBWW – EFBH – FETBBA lot more needs to be done to better protect construction workers from asbestos
  2. European Committee of the RegionsRe-Watch EURegions Week 2022
  3. UNESDA - Soft Drinks EuropeCall for EU action – SMEs in the beverage industry call for fairer access to recycled material
  4. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic prime ministers: “We will deepen co-operation on defence”
  5. EFBWW – EFBH – FETBBConstruction workers can check wages and working conditions in 36 countries
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic and Canadian ministers join forces to combat harmful content online

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us