Wednesday

24th May 2017

EU's top priority to 'get migrant numbers down'

  • Timmermans (l), Juncker (c), and Rutte met to mark the launch of the Dutch EU presidency (Photo: ec.europa.eu)

The Dutch EU presidency and the European Commission have said their top priority in the next six months is to reduce the number of asylum seekers.

Mark Rutte, the Dutch leader, whose country is to chair EU proceedings until July, said in Amsterdam on Thursday (7 January): “To stem the flow of migrants, to bring down these numbers consideraby, is of crucial importance. We cannot continue with the present numbers.”

Dear EUobserver reader

Subscribe now for unrestricted access to EUobserver.

Sign up for 30 days' free trial, no obligation. Full subscription only 15 € / month or 150 € / year.

  1. Unlimited access on desktop and mobile
  2. All premium articles, analysis, commentary and investigations
  3. EUobserver archives

EUobserver is the only independent news media covering EU affairs in Brussels and all 28 member states.

♡ We value your support.

If you already have an account click here to login.

The commission president, Jean-Claude Juncker, and the Dutch EU commissioner, Frans Timmermans, echoed his remarks.

Juncker noted that one of Rutte’s big jobs will be to push through the creation of a new European border force and coast guard.

The commission’s controversial plan envisages posting EU border officers to the bloc’s external boundaries even if the host states don’t want them.

Juncker said the border force is needed to help save the Schengen passport-free travel zone.

He voiced “understanding” with Sweden, the latest Schengen state to reimpose border checks in order to curtail migrant access.

But he added: “I can’t accept that now we’re abandoning the Schengen system and all that it means.”

“We can’t go on with this process, where, day after day, another member state is reintroducing border controls.”

Turkey

Timmermans, the author of an EU-Turkey deal designed to stem the flow of people, mainly Syrians, from refugee camps in Turkey, noted that “over the last couple of weeks the figures have remained relatively high, so there’s still a lot of work to do.”

He said the “only benchmark” of whether the deal works is “the figures going down … substantially down.”

“We’re a long way from being satisified.”

He added the EU must also get better at spotting “at an early stage who has the right to international protection, and those who don’t have the right to remain in Europe should be returned to their country of origin.”

The UN refugee agency, the UNHCR, estimates that 1 million people came to Europe to seek protection last year, most of them from Syria or Afghanistan.

The crisis has seen Austria, Denmark, Germany, Slovenia, and Sweden reimpose border checks. France also reintroduced checks after the November Paris attacks.

'We need to deliver'

The crisis has also prompted talk of creating a "mini-Schengen" of mostly northern EU states and of a "coalition of the willing" of countries willing to share the refugee burden.

Rutte said on Thursday he is less interested in speculation on the future of the EU than in practical outcomes, however.

He said discussion on "a Europe of many speeds or one speed or whatever" is less important than getting to grips with border security and refugee burden sharing.

"We need to deliver," he said.

Sweden keen to slow Europe's 'refugee highway'

German, Swedish, and Danish ministers have vowed to maintain the EU's passport-free Schengen zone amid broader moves to stem the flow of migrants and asylum seekers.

EU failing to deliver on migration plans

Three out of 11 hotspots in place. Two hundred and seventy people out of 160,000 relocated: Last year's EU promises to limit and better manage migration flows yet to materialise.

Opinion

EU refugee crisis: History repeating

Refugees and hostile public reactions are nothing new in Europe. People like Nobel Prize laureate Fridtjof Nansen, who helped over 1 million people find shelter after WWI, should be a model.

Agenda

Poland steals EU spotlight This WEEK

EP to hold debate on Polish government's constitutional and media "coup". Dutch PM Rutte to outline views on migrant crisis, MEPs to also put together VW inquest team.

Investigation

Fight club: Russian spies seek EU recruits

Russian intelligence services are using martial arts clubs to recruit potential troublemakers in Germany and other EU countries, security experts have warned.

News in Brief

  1. Pressure grows on climate impact of EU timber harvesting
  2. US goes after Fiat Chrysler over emissions cheat
  3. Munich police break up Europe-wide burglar clan
  4. Report: VW threatened with €19.7 billion French fine
  5. Turkey begins mass trial of suspected coup leaders
  6. Merkel's CDU consolidates lead in polls
  7. France to host Russian president
  8. Switzerland votes against nuclear power

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. UNICEFChild Alert on Myanmar: Fruits of Rapid Development yet to Reach Remote Regions
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersBecome an Explorer - 'Traces of Nordic' Seeking Storytellers Around the World
  3. Malta EU 2017Closer Cooperation and Reinforced Solidarity to Ensure Security of Gas Supply
  4. European Healthy Lifestyle AllianceHigh-Intensity Interval Training Is Therapeutic Option for Type 2 Diabetes
  5. Dialogue Platform"The West Must Help Turkey Return to a Democratic Path" a Call by Fethullah Gulen
  6. ILGA-EuropeRainbow Europe 2017 Is Live - Which Countries Are Leading on LGBTI Equality?
  7. Centre Maurits CoppietersWhen You Invest in a Refugee Woman You Help the Whole Community
  8. Eurogroup for AnimalsECJ Ruling: Member States Given No Say on Wildlife Protection In Trade
  9. European Heart NetworkCall for Urgent Adoption of EU-Wide Nutrient Profiles for Nutrition & Health Claims
  10. Counter BalanceInvestment Plan for Europe More Climate Friendly but European Parliament Shows Little Ambition
  11. Mission of China to the EUPresident Xi: China's Belt and Road Initiative Benefits People Around the World
  12. Malta EU 2017EU Strengthens Control of the Acquisition and Possession of Firearms