Monday

26th Jun 2017

Opinion

Ethiopia can address internal challenges by itself

  • Ethiopia's prime minister Hailemariam Desalegn (l) with EU commission Jean-Claude Juncker (c) and Federica Mogherini (r) at the signing of the Ethiopia-EU strategic engagement declaration in Brussels in June 2016. (Photo: European Commission)

In an opinion piece published on 6 October on EUobserver, Felix Horne, Ethiopia researcher at Human Rights Watch, said the European Union (EU) needed to adopt a new approach to Ethiopia, referring to the protests that have taken place in some parts of the country in recent months.

According to him, the EU has to use its role of main cooperation partner to "push Ethiopia" to accept an international investigation and take several measures, including respect of divergent views and bringing security forces to justice in case of illegitimate use of force. This would, according to Mr Horne, ultimately ensure the country remains a stable partner of the EU on the long term.

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However, this suggestion is off-topic. It assumes EU-Ethiopia cooperation is a unilateral donor-recipient relationship whereas it is based on mutual interest and respect. Both parties know how to govern their relations. The EU is a very important partner of Ethiopia and a constructive dialogue mechanism has been established.

Moreover, any imposed international investigation would be unacceptable. As prime minister Hailemariam Desalegn recently said, Ethiopia is a sovereign and independent country and it has its internal institutional mechanism for investigation and accountability.

Bypassing the institutional mechanisms would undermine and discredit the constitutional obligations of the government. The Ethiopian government, by the pertinent constitutional institution, will carry out its own investigation and rectify any shortcomings.

Not an easy task

When the Federal Democratic Republic was established in 1991, Ethiopia started working on democratic and human rights issues not because it was pushed from outside through financial or other incentives, but because its people and government firmly believed it is the only way for Ethiopia to accommodate the multiple identities and diversities in the country and to achieve prosperity and stability.

More fundamentally, as prime minister Hailemariam put it, these values are central for the very "survival" of the country which is made out of more than 80 nations and nationalities.

Implementing these values is not an easy task. Especially when the country's democratic history is a very young one. The government has to find a balance between maintaining law and order and delivering genuine solutions to people’s demands including lack of effective good governance and unemployment challenges.

Much work has been done, among others through a progressive constitution by protecting rights of individuals and groups. Moreover, the government has addressed the legitimate demands and launched deep renewal to address these challenges with the inclusive and full participation of Ethiopians from all walks of life.

To assess the cause of loss of life in the first wave of unrest that started in the two regional states of Oromia and Amhara in November 2015, the Ethiopian Human Rights Commission has made an independent inquiry presented to the national parliament.

It conclusions were that, though measures taken by the law enforcement agents and the federal police to control the situation were proportionate, in some specific cases security forces used excessive force to control the violence.

Complex situation

The government said it would make sure that those responsible for violence or illegal acts during the protests, or who were responsible for any undue use of force, would be brought to justice.

But the inquiry also pointed out that violent groups inside and outside the country, especially extremists in the diaspora, took part in the protests, hijacking legitimate demands by propagating hate speech through social media.

The repeated involvement in protests of several groups trying to undermine and ultimately overthrow the legitimate government of the country through violence has since then become even more obvious, as it has led to destruction of foreign investments, public and private properties and attacks on police, as reported in international media. This shows the complexity of the situation the government and security forces face.

In the last 25 years, the country has made tremendous progress in the economy, infrastructure, access to health and education among others.

It can now legitimately aspire to become a middle-income country by 2025. This was confirmed by a 2010 independent survey of people’s attitudes that revealed that 50 percent of the population believed they were better off in 2010 than in 2005 and three quarters expected this improvement to continue in the future.

Alongside these developments, new challenges have arisen related to access to jobs for young graduates, and lack of efficient and effective governance. The Ethiopian government is determined to address them in effective ways.

EU partnership

The European Union has been a key ally to alleviating poverty and improving the population's well-being. In this context, the EU is more important than ever to Ethiopia as a partner, and its role has increased during the past years following a set of high-level political consultations.

After significant milestones such as the Common Agenda on Migration and Mobility in November 2015 and the establishment of a friendship group within the European Parliament in March 2016, prime minister Hailemariam Desalegn and Jean-Claude Junker, European Commission president, signed an Ethiopia-EU strategic engagement document in Brussels on 14 June 2016.

Ethiopia values the partnership with the European Union helping the country to address its developmental issues and to face its internal challenges constructively. The European Union is also keen to intensify its partnership with Ethiopia as stated by an inter-service EU commission delegation currently visiting the country.

Teshome Toga, ambassador extraordinary and plenipotentiary of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia to the Benelux and Baltic countries and to the European Union

EU needs new approach on Ethiopia

The EU has recently shown willingness to criticise rights abuses in Ethiopia. It should go further and call for an international inquiry in the current crackdown on protests.

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The outcome of the Eurogroup meeting this week leaves a positive footprint, setting the basis for the Greek economy to exit the vicious circle of austerity and debt.

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Following the poor performance of Theresa May's Conservatives in the recent UK general election, her prospects of negotiating a good Brexit deal have gone from bad to worse.

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The European Parliament is currently fine-tuning its negotiating position on the Commission's proposal from September 2016 for a mandatory transparency register. Sadly, so far it seems to prefer empty statements to bold action.

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