Saturday

20th Apr 2019

Opinion

It's time for progressives to save Europe. Again.

  • Prioritising market forces over public policy will not resolve the financial crisis which most EU countries are still mired in. If the demands of the market continue to be promoted over all other concerns, Europe will be pushed to the brink of catastrophe (Photo: PES)

I believe - profoundly - that the EU is not only the ultimate political achievement of the modern world - it's also its most beautiful project.

But now this peaceful union is in trouble. Right-wing parties have come to power and prize the demands of the free market over the need for freedom.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Support quality EU news

Get instant access to all articles — and 18 year's of archives. 30 days free trial.

... or join as a group

According to conservative politicians, the economy does not exist to serve human beings but rather human beings exist to serve the economy. The free market was once viewed as a useful tool for raising living standards.

Now its demands appear to be prioritised over everything else. As social democrats, we must categorically refuse to reduce workers to the status of service personnel and this belief - which has already been enshrined in the Lisbon Treaty - must remain at the core of the united European project.

Right-wing governments are also presiding over ever increasing inequality. The income gap is now so large it rivals that which existed at the end of the 19th century.

The super-rich are permitted to evade taxes by employing teams of skilful accountants and lawyers whilst funnelling huge sums into offshore accounts.

While the top one percent have accumulated ever greater wealth and influence, the living standards of the remaining 99 percent of the population have only declined.

And right-wingers have stripped 'fraternity' - the sense of brotherhood - from the European idea entirely. Where once public policy was implemented across the EU - leading to a rise in prosperity amongst citizens across Europe - rightwing governments have imposed austerity within their own borders.

So while the super-rich continue to indulge in ever more conspicuous consumption, the vast majority have suffered under new economic restrictions.

Abandoning the core values of a united Europe is destabilising Europe once again. The future seems increasingly uncertain.

Under rightwing rule, individual citizens have lost many of the benefits of the welfare state.

At this very moment, Europe is so weakened from the inside it is struggling to confront a series of crises involving immigration, climate change, terrorism and 'hybrid-war' beyond its borders.

As politicians, we have betrayed the legacy of the founding members of the EU. Instead of uniting with a common purpose for a better future, we have fallen into old divisions, blamed each other for our problems, and allowed distrust to grow between EU member states.

Sacrificing mutual values in the name of profit dramatically exacerbated our predicament - market egotism translated into national selfishness.

The Brexit vote was only the most obvious symptom of this condition.

Prioritising market forces over public policy will not resolve the financial crisis which most EU countries are still mired in. If the demands of the market continue to be promoted over all other concerns, Europe will be pushed to the brink of catastrophe.

An ever-enlarging gap

The World Bank recently announced that the gap between rich and poor in the EU has grown by over 70 percent during the last 15 years.

Ten percent of the poorest Europeans have lost seven percent of their income, while ten percent of the wealthiest have become 66 percent richer.

Such obscene inequality has provoked protests and strikes across the EU. From Brussels to Sofia, the demands are the same: decent work for decent pay, equal rights, higher pensions and better prospects for young people.

Young people, themselves, have demonstrated against climate change, aware that environmental issues have been pushed down the political agenda because the legislation that is needed to halt global warming may affect profits and go down badly with shareholders.

Meanwhile, as ruling rightwing parties seemed to offer no help to voters, more reactionary, inflammatory and xenophobic voices began to be heard in the public forum.

Within the space of a few years, extremist ideas - which were once the preserve of niche spaces on the internet - began to stake a claim on mainstream political debate.

Hatred of the 'other' came to be represented as an expression of national dignity while intolerance masqueraded as a reaction to 'political correctness.'

Untruths replaced fact. Shouting put an end to dialogue. Division has been sown where once there was unity.

We have seen this before so we know what happens next - a rise in anti-Semitism. In recent months, in some European countries, we appear to have reached this point.

I am honoured to belong to one of the few nations in Europe that saved its Jewish population from being exterminated by the Nazis during the Second World War.

Almost 50,000 human beings avoided internment in death camps because brave Bulgarian leaders maintained a strong popular resistance. I will not tolerate any resurgence in anti-Semitism. We - the European social democratic and progressive forces - must not allow it.

But ruling rightwing politicians have engaged in a dangerous flirtations with hate-mongering prophets of doom in recent years.

In order to continue governing in Europe they have embraced nationalism and in doing so have seemed to legitimise a whole host of zealots. Thus, the far-right is paralysing the European ideal.

Instead of trying to ensure the continent remains united and a home to all, nationalists want to carve it up into nation states once again, creating individual countries that view each other with suspicion and distrust - across borders of barbed wire.

Progressive's mission

Today, the mission of all European progressive parties must be to halt the division and destruction of the European Union and so save the future of Europe.

We - in Socialist, Democrat and Labour parties - were instrumental in building the peaceful and prosperous Europe that right-wing parties are tearing up.

Next month, the EU elections will decide our fate. We must not allow nationalism to triumph once again - as has been predicted.

The European Union will not survive if it continues to treat its citizens as lackeys, sacrifices freedom to (unproven) security measures, trades in democracy and the rule of law for political stability, treats healthcare as a privilege rather than a right, and EU cohesion funds as piggy banks for big business - prizing the one percent over the 99.

This is why we are convinced that the restoration of the European project must begin with the New Social Contract for Europe - the political platform put forward by progressives which seeks to transform Europe after the elections in May.

I am convinced this new contract represents how we can rebuild the EU on the basis of 'libery, egality and fraternity'.

Europe will either become more united and progressive or it will not exist at all. If the continent is to survive as we know it, the EU must remain intact - preserving human rights, dignity and freedom for each and every one of us.

Sergei Stanishev is president of the Party of European Socialists

EUobserved

'Non-partisan' Timmermans campaigns for EU in Leiden

EU commissioners are touring Europe to reach out to citizens ahead of the May elections - but some are also running for office. Frans Timmermans visited Leiden in his native Netherlands, but managed to not mention his own party once.

Orban hosts Weber in Budapest for EPP showdown

The future of the Viktor Orban's Fidesz party inside the European Parliament's centre-right EPP political group hangs in the balance. On Tuesday, Orban and EPP chief Manfred Weber meet in Budapest in a final effort to iron out differences.

Magazine

The Spitzen process - a coup that was never accepted

It is a divisive 'Brussels bubble' debate: whether to give the European Parliament more of a say on who becomes the next European Commission president. But the issue goes right to the heart of European integration.

How Brexit may harm the new EU parliament

British plans to - maybe - take part in EU elections risk legal chaos in the next European Parliament, which could be resolved only by treaty change - an unlikely prospect.

Press freedom and the EU elections

We are campaigning for the next European Commission to appoint a commissioner with a clear mandate to take on the challenge of the protection of freedom, independence and diversity of journalism.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Counter BalanceSign the petition to help reform the EU’s Bank
  2. UNICEFChild rights organisations encourage candidates for EU elections to become Child Rights Champions
  3. UNESDAUNESDA Outlines 2019-2024 Aspirations: Sustainability, Responsibility, Competitiveness
  4. Counter BalanceRecord citizens’ input to EU bank’s consultation calls on EIB to abandon fossil fuels
  5. International Partnership for Human RightsAnnual EU-Turkmenistan Human Rights Dialogue takes place in Ashgabat
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersNew campaign: spot, capture and share Traces of North
  7. Nordic Council of MinistersLeading Nordic candidates go head-to-head in EU election debate
  8. Nordic Council of MinistersNew Secretary General: Nordic co-operation must benefit everybody
  9. Platform for Peace and JusticeMEP Kati Piri: “Our red line on Turkey has been crossed”
  10. UNICEF2018 deadliest year yet for children in Syria as war enters 9th year
  11. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic commitment to driving global gender equality
  12. International Partnership for Human RightsMeet your defender: Rasul Jafarov leading human rights defender from Azerbaijan

Latest News

  1. Romania drafts EU code on NGO migrant rescues
  2. Bulgaria, Hungary, and Malta shamed on press unfreedom
  3. EU drafts $20bn US sanctions list in aviation dispute
  4. Brunei defends stoning to death of gay men in EU letter
  5. US Democrats side with Ireland on Brexit
  6. Wifi or 5G to connect EU cars? MEPs weigh in
  7. How Brexit may harm the new EU parliament
  8. EU parliament backs whistleblower law

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. UNICEFUNICEF Hosts MEPs in Jordan Ahead of Brussels Conference on the Future of Syria
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic talks on parental leave at the UN
  3. International Partnership for Human RightsTrial of Chechen prisoner of conscience and human rights activist Oyub Titiev continues.
  4. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic food policy inspires India to be a sustainable superpower
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersMilestone for Nordic-Baltic e-ID
  6. Counter BalanceEU bank urged to free itself from fossil fuels and take climate leadership
  7. Intercultural Dialogue PlatformRoundtable: Muslim Heresy and the Politics of Human Rights, Dr. Matthew J. Nelson
  8. Platform for Peace and JusticeTurkey suffering from the lack of the rule of law
  9. UNESDASoft Drinks Europe welcomes Tim Brett as its new president
  10. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic ministers take the lead in combatting climate change
  11. Counter BalanceEuropean Parliament takes incoherent steps on climate in future EU investments
  12. International Partnership For Human RightsKyrgyz authorities have to immediately release human rights defender Azimjon Askarov

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersSeminar on disability and user involvement
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersInternational appetite for Nordic food policies
  3. Nordic Council of MinistersNew Nordic Innovation House in Hong Kong
  4. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Region has chance to become world leader when it comes to start-ups
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersTheresa May: “We will not be turning our backs on the Nordic region”
  6. International Partnership for Human RightsOpen letter to Emmanuel Macron ahead of Uzbek president's visit
  7. International Partnership for Human RightsRaising key human rights concerns during visit of Turkmenistan's foreign minister
  8. Nordic Council of MinistersState of the Nordic Region presented in Brussels
  9. Nordic Council of MinistersThe vital bioeconomy. New issue of “Sustainable Growth the Nordic Way” out now
  10. Nordic Council of MinistersThe Nordic gender effect goes international
  11. Nordic Council of MinistersPaula Lehtomaki from Finland elected as the Council's first female Secretary General
  12. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic design sets the stage at COP24, running a competition for sustainable chairs

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us