Thursday

30th Jun 2022

Column

Bigots, bores and EU's bogus debate will not ruin my Xmas

Listen to article

Bored tonight, nothing on Netflix and suffering from a gentle hangover?

Never fear, just tune in to a recording of last week's European Parliament debate on fun, faith and fundamentalism, European Union-style.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Become an expert on Europe

Get instant access to all articles — and 20 years of archives. 14-day free trial.

... or subscribe as a group

  • The parliament's faux and divisive 'Christmas' debate failed to live up to Europe's slogan of "unity in diversity"

You will not be disappointed.

The EU assembly has ended 2021 on a high note by offering a unique deep dive into what European Commission president Ursula von der Leyen has called the "soul" of Europe.

What a dive, what a soul.

Just watch as fervour, passion and anger run high and MEPs stake out their stalls on the 'meaning of Christmas'. There is something for just about everyone.

For the religious, there's the joy of watching an epic battle between saints and sinners. For the moral police, there's a neat divide between the vicious and the virtuous. Cultural warriors can watch a seminal EU struggle between progressives and reactionaries.

Europe's preening populists can sit back and relax while their conservative brothers and sisters dog whistle to the far-right.

And psychologists – as well as voters - can start worrying right now about the state of mind of some of the EU's leading politicians.

Here are some key takeaways.

First, just chill everyone, Europe is not cancelling Christmas. Far from it. Celebrating Christmas is now an add-on test of EU identity.

Personally, I am delighted because Santa and I go back a long way. As a little girl I looked forward to my annual meetings with Santa as he distributed presents and good cheer at a once-iconic hotel in Karachi.

Like me, the man dressed up in Santa regalia was brown, many of the people around him were also brown and probably a mix of Christians, Muslims and Hindus - and everyone was smiling.

My love affair with Christmas has endured. But recently it has become a tad one-sided because Santa will not return my calls anymore.

I do not blame him; it is Santa's helpers who are at fault.

I suspect that co-stars of the parliamentary debate, Manfred Weber, leader of the European People's Party group in the European Parliament, Margaritis Schinas, European Commission vice president and Antonio Tajani, a former European Parliament president, have been whispering some not-so sweet nothings in Santa's ear.

Their cries of 'Europe is Christian' are not new. Hungary's Viktor Orban and Europe's motley collection of far-right icons have been repeating the mantra for years.

What is new and sad is that mainstream EPP politicians are now joining in and transforming one of the world's most inclusive celebrations into another nasty, ill-tempered "us and them" affair.

This is bad news. Rewriting Europe's wonderful past and reinforcing divides are dangerous games.

True, as Weber pointed out, "churches in European cities, as well as culinary traditions, dance and music" are part of Europe's Christian roots. But paganism, Judaism and Islam have also played their part.

EU institutions may remain enclosed in a #BrusselsSoWhite bubble, but most European countries are home to vibrant non-Christian and non-white communities which are contributing to Europe's culture, politics, economy, and societies.

Millions of essential workers, many of whom are migrant, Black and Muslim, are playing a vital part in tackling Covid-19.

Also, Schinas' lyrical reference to building a Europe where people can aspire to be "whoever you want to be and aim as high as you want to be" would sound more uplifting if racism, bias and discrimination were not thriving across Europe.

'Anti-woke alliance'?

Building an "anti-woke" alliance may be fun but spoiler alert: the struggle is already lost.

Europe's progress towards a "Union of Equality" is certainly slow and unsteady but time and tide wait for no one.

Those opposed to the EU equality commissioner Helena Dalli's effort to introduce new guidelines to ensure that EU staff members do not sound too bigoted, sexist, Islamophobic and Afro-phobic in their daily interactions may have succeeded in scaring the commission into withdrawing the document.

But across Europe, big and small businesses as well as private and public sector organisations are engaged in very similar efforts to become more inclusive, less sexist and more diverse.

The backlash against Dalli makes the EU look even more clueless in comparison.

The reality is that most Europeans are moving into a post #BlackLivesMatter world. The EU's Anti-Racism Action Plan is still around and being slowly implemented.

People working for the EU institutions have set up their very first staff association to promote diversity, raise awareness of ethnic and racial diversity and promote inclusion.

In Berlin, a new governing coalition is signalling a change in attitudes towards migrants in stark contrast to France where hysteria against migration – and Muslims – is reaching dangerously high levels.

As one-time refugee and legendary superstar Freddie Mercury sang all those years ago, Christmas provides a pause to reflect on what has been "a long, hard year."

The parliament's faux and divisive debate failed to live up to Europe's slogan of "unity in diversity".

So let me try and make-up for the EU institutions' bad manners by wishing everyone: Merry Christmas, Happy New Year and a Joyous Festive Season.

Author bio

Shada Islam is an independent EU analyst and commentator who runs her own strategy and advisory company New Horizons Project.

Disclaimer

The views expressed in this opinion piece are the author's, not those of EUobserver.

Column

Biden's 'democracy summit' is a risky venture

"America is back" may have soothed souls in the past but today's world is a 'mix and match' one where nations don't want a binary choice between aligning with the US, or becoming part of Beijing's orbit.

Column

'Brussels So White' needs action, not magical thinking

A commitment to fighting racism cannot go hand in hand with 'Fortress Europe' policies which demonise black, brown and Muslim refugees and migrants or with rights violations linked to Frontex pushbacks.

Column

AUKUS ruckus may blow over but transatlantic scars run deep

As US-China rivalries heat up, Europeans will be asked to join all kinds of new and exciting macho military alliances to show the world just who is boss. The temptation to join the bandwagon should be resisted.

Column

Faux woke wars must not derail EU anti-racism plans

For many politicians in France, Europe is in the midst of a no-holds-barred culture war in which the real enemy is not Russia or China but with emboldened woke fighters on a mission to demolish the "European Way of Life."

If Russia collapses — which states will break away?

Increasingly, analysts—both inside and outside of Russia—are considering the possibility of the Russian Federation's collapse and transformation into a series of independent states. Who are the most likely candidates for secession in Russia's south, east, and centre?

The euro — who's next?

Bulgaria's target date for joining the eurozone, 1 January 2024, seems elusive. The collapse of Kiril Petkov's government, likely fresh elections, with populists trying to score cheap points against the 'diktat of the eurocrats', might well delay accession.

Column

China's support for Russia challenges Europe's Peace Order

China's soft support to Russia is deeply troubling for Europe. Here is the EU's biggest trading partner signalling that it is on the side of Russia, its aggression, and its challenge to the post-war international order.

Sturgeon's 2023 'referendum' gamble for Scotland

The independence campaign launch featured a new Scottish government report, comparing the UK's economic and social record with those of other European states — and arguing, unsurprisingly, that Scotland should be independent as a result.

News in Brief

  1. Russia threatens Norway over goods transit
  2. Russia urges Nato not to build bases in Sweden, Finland
  3. New president for European Committee of the Regions
  4. Gas flows from Spain to Morocco, after Western Sahara row
  5. BioNTech, Pfizer test 'universal' coronavirus vaccine
  6. UK sanctions second-richest Russian businessman
  7. Hungary permits emergency supervision of energy firms
  8. Bulgaria expels 70 alleged Russian spies

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersEmerging journalists from the Nordics and Canada report the facts of the climate crisis
  2. Council of the EUEU: new rules on corporate sustainability reporting
  3. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic ministers for culture: Protect Ukraine’s cultural heritage!
  4. Reuters InstituteDigital News Report 2022
  5. EFBWW – EFBH – FETBBHow price increases affect construction workers
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersNew Nordic think tank examines influence of tech giants

Latest News

  1. If Russia collapses — which states will break away?
  2. EU Parliament interpreters stage strike
  3. EU's post-Covid billions flowing into black hole
  4. Nato expands and reinforces on Russian flank
  5. EU Commission says it cannot find messages with Pfizer CEO
  6. EU ministers sign off on climate laws amid German infighting
  7. EU presidency still looking for asylum relocation pledges
  8. Finland and Sweden to join Nato, as Erdoğan drops veto

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us