Friday

28th Apr 2017

France appoints 'top cop' interior minister as PM

  • Manuel Valls became France's PM after Jean-Marc Ayrault quit (Photo: The Council of the European Union)

France’s interior minister Manuel Valls was named Prime Minister on Monday (31 March) by centre-left president Francois Hollande.

The 51-year old Valls replaced Jean-Marc Ayrault, who quit after the French socialist government took a beating by both centre-right and far-right groups in local elections.

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But Valls, also known as top cop or "premier flic" in France, has drawn criticism from pro-rights group for his law and order drive against the minority Roma population.

“The majority [of Roma] should be delivered back to the borders. We are not here to welcome these people,” he said last September.

The Barcelona-born son of Spanish immigrants, Valls said France’s job is not to deal with the misery of others.

There are an estimated 20,000 Roma in France. Valls kicked out around half in the first six months of 2013. Most are from Bulgaria, Romania, and Balkan countries.

Valls’ tough stance against the minority is compared to the hard line taken by former conservative president Nicolas Sarkozy.

A report by the London-based Amnesty International called for an end to the forced evictions in France, noting that authorities make few attempts to protect the vulnerable.

Amnesty International secretary general Salil Shetty told this website earlier this year that the EU risks losing credibility and legitimacy with the wider world due to member states' treatment of minority groups.

“Roma are the single largest minority group with wide-spread discrimination across countries and across sectors,” he said.

Discrimination affects all aspects of Roma life like health, education, employment and evictions, he noted.

Shetty said the European Commission was not doing enough to enforce the EU's racial equality directive.

“They [European Commission] are supposed to monitor compliance, but that is not happening. Infringement proceedings are not being used,” he said.

Shetty said the commission’s argument that there is not enough evidence for a legal case “is outrageous”.

“We feel there is so much evidence that has already been gathered, we ourselves have submitted evidence of abuse,” he said.

The commission, for its part, says it is up to member states to enforce the rules of the directive on the ground.

It launched a number of initial infringements against France and Poland because they had not fully transposed the directive into national legislation.

The transposition infringements were later dropped after it ruled them compliant.

Roma are EU citizens too, Romanian President says

Romania's president has strongly defended freedom of movement within the EU, saying Roma have the same rights as other EU citizens and should not be misused for populist campaigns.

Opinion

Hate speech, not Europe, tops agenda in French EU vote

The European election is largely absent from the French public sphere, but the same cannot be said for hate speech. The only ones to profit from this electoral silence are extreme parties.

EPP group frustrated with Orban

Orban's ruling Fidesz party is getting too much to handle for the EPP group, as they are once again forced to defend the Hungarian premier's controversial actions.

Analysis

Orban set to face down EU threats

The European Commission and Parliament are to debate Hungary's slide into illiberal democracy. But the bloc continues to think that Hungarian leader Viktor Orban is not a systemic threat.

France still anxious over possibility of Le Pen win

Despite opinion polls that place centrist Macron well ahead of the far-right leader Le Pen in the 7 May presidential run-off, doubts are emerging about his capacity to unite the French people around his candidacy.

News in Brief

  1. Vote of no confidence prepared against Spanish PM
  2. Syria to buy Russian anti-missile system
  3. Germany seeks partial burka ban
  4. Libya has no plan to stop migration flows
  5. EU has no evidence of NGO-smuggler collusion in Libya
  6. Poland gets 'final warning' on logging in ancient forest
  7. Commission gives Italy final warning on air pollution
  8. Romania and Slovenia taken to court over environment policies

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