Sunday

19th Aug 2018

Oettinger flight was not a meeting, commission says

  • The Commission sees no problem with Oettinger flying with a lobbyist, says transparency rules don't apply here (Photo: European Commission)

The European Commission stood by German commissioner Guenther Oettinger on Thursday (17 November), saying that his flight with a lobbyist in May was not a meeting that fell under EU ethics and transparency rules.

Oettinger has come under pressure for flying from Brussels to Budapest on 18 May to a conference the next day on the private jet of Klaus Mangold, a German businessman and lobbyist advocating for lifting EU sanctions on Russia.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Support quality EU news

Get instant access to all articles — and 18 year's of archives. 30 days free trial.

... or join as a group

Oettinger says he made the flight on the invitation of the Hungarian government.

The commission's spokesman said that the transportation did not constitute a gift, which commissioners are not allowed to accept, nor did the two-hour journey count as a meeting with a lobbyist.

"He [Oettinger] had to opt for this type of transport as he received an invitation to meet one of the 28 heads of state or government, and the only possible way to do it was to accept the invitation from the Hungarian government [which] offered him this specific kind of transport," Margaritis Schinas said.

"This would not be seen as a conflict of interest," he added.

He said that a meeting was not the same as a journey.

"It’s one thing a meeting planned with someone falling under the transparency rules, and it’s different travelling …There is a clear difference between a meeting and a journey," the spokesman said.

Schinas also said that the commission's transparency rules did not apply in Oettinger's case.

"It was not a meeting that falls under the very specific requirements of code of conduct or transparency registry, it was not in the commissioner’s competence, because he is on the digital agenda, and the gentleman in question [Mangold] is not connected to the digital agenda, and in any case, this was an offer from the Hungarian government," he said.

In Budapest, the prime minister's chief of staff, Janos Lazar, told journalists that Mangold had been recently helping the Hungarian government with digital issues, however.

He said that it was Mangold who recommended to Hungarian authorities to organise conferences on the issue in May, and again on Thursday (17 November), which commissioner Oettinger attended.

'Ludicrous' interpretations

Lobby watchdogs have criticised the commission's response.

"The commission's explanation that there is no obligation to declare meetings that fall outside of the commissioner's portfolio, is simply incorrect," Daniel Freund, Transparency International's head of advocacy on EU integrity, told EUobserver.

"The commission's interpretation of the transparency rules is ludicrous," Vicky Cann, of the Corporate Europe Observatory, told this website.

"The commission's rules from 2014 clearly state that ‘members of the commission shall make public information on all meetings held by them ... with organisations or self-employed individuals'," Freund pointed out.

He said that "there is no exception with regards to what falls outside of their portfolio, only purely personal meetings and a very restricted group of actors such as political party representatives could be exceptions."

"I don't understand which exception Mangold would fall into," the transparency expert said.

"The only scenario where this could be the case is if Oettinger and Mangold talked only about the weather during the flight, which I find highly unlikely," Freund added.

He noted that "who arranged the trip does not really matter. What matters is who paid the gift. If you are suggested to accept a gift, you are still breaking the rules if you accept it. As far as the explanations from the commission go, it still seems that Oettinger broke both lobby and ethics rules."

Corporate Europe Observatory's Vicky Cann said that in any case, "commissioners share collective responsibility so it is not possible to clearly limit transparency requirements by portfolio."

"Any discussions on EU policy between a commissioner and third party interests while sharing a private jet should clearly be seen as lobbying. After all, Oettinger was not going on holiday on a commercial flight. He was flying, as a commissioner, on a private jet, to attend an official meeting," she said.

Lobbyist and advisor

Oettinger said that the flight on Mangold's plane was proposed and also paid for by the Hungarian government.

Questioned by journalists, prime minister Viktor Orban’s chief of staff Janos Lazar indicated that the government has had a framework agreement with Klaus Mangold’s consultancy firm for the past six or seven years.

He added that under the agreement with Mangold, the Hungarian government asked the German businessman to help organise the May conference on the future of cars in Budapest, to which Oettinger went.

Lazar said that the Hungarian state has no plane and that the use of Mangold's plane “fits into” the general agreement with him, if the government asks for it.

He declined to reveal the value of the contract between the Hungarian government and Mangold, whom he called a "friend and advisor" to the cabinet.

He said that Orban asked for a dinner with Oettinger on digital issues. "I think it [the invitation] was sent out weeks before," Lazar said, referring to the 18 May evening dinner.

"It was not easy to organise," he added. "We have asked him [Mangold] to help organising the dinner and suggested to Oettinger to come together to discuss digital issues," Lazar told journalists.

Even after possible weeks of planning, the Hungarian government's offer seemed to have surprised the commission.

"This was something offered by the Hungarian government, it was unexpected, it wasn’t planned, and it was something offered to make this meeting possible," the commission’s spokesman, Schinas, said.

'Petty revenge'

Lazar called the issue a “petty revenge” by Hungarian Green MEP Benedek Javor for having failed to derail the extension of the Paks nuclear plant, a project known as Paks II.

Javor earlier suggested that the controversial Russian-built extension of Hungary’s only nuclear plant was discussed by Oettinger, a former energy EU commissioner, Mangold and Orban.

Both the commission and the Hungarian government have denied the Paks II claim.

Javor, along with the Green EU parliament group leader Rebecca Harms, revealed Oettinger's flight in July when they sent a written question to the commission.

The commission on Thursday (17 November) ended one of the probes into the Paks II plant, closing an infringement case against Hungary on EU public procurement rules.

The case was opened a year ago, because Hungary did not hold an open tender when it hired Russia’s Rosatom to expand the Paks nuclear power plant.

The commission said the direct award to Rosatom was compatible with EU rules "on the grounds that Hungary has sufficiently justified the need to apply the technical exclusivity provision."

The commission also said Hungary has "committed to ensuring that most of the other parts of the project will be subcontracted respecting transparency, equal treatment and non-discrimination."

Another commission probe is still ongoing on possible illegal state aid in the Paks II case.

Investigation

MEPs criticise Oettinger's 'judgement'

The German commissioner says it was normal to travel by a private jet owned by a German businessman. MEPs, with the exception of Oettinger's own EPP group, are gearing up to grill him.

Investigation

German EU commissioner rejects wrongdoing

Oettinger said he used pro-Russia lobbyist's jet because it was the only way to make dinner in Budapest, but who paid for the trip?

Investigation

Oettinger left no trace of VW Dieselgate meeting

EU commissioner for the digital economy and society, Guenther Oettinger, met with German carmakers in January to discuss "diesel emissions", even though the topic is not in his portfolio.

Investigation

Commission still silent on Hungarian nuclear contract

The EU executive has still not explained why it accepted that a contract with Russia to extend the Paks plant could be awarded without a public tender, and why commissioner Oettinger travelled with a lobbyist working for the Hungarian government.

News in Brief

  1. Germany and Greece strike deal on taking back migrants
  2. Merkel confronts far-right critics: '2015 will not be repeated'
  3. UN: Predictable disembarkation process urgently needed
  4. Slovenia set to select former comedian as prime minister
  5. Polish president to veto election rule helping big parties
  6. MEPs blast UK 'alphabetical approach' on citizens rights
  7. EU hits back over Salvini's blame for bridge collapse
  8. Poll: Sweden's social democrat-led government set to win again

Opinion

While Poles defend courts, Kaczynski hijacks EU elections

While Twitter and EU bubble publications are flooded with photos of protesting crowds and "chains of light" in front of the presidential palace, the Law and Justice-controlled senate has adopted a law restructuring the electoral code for 2019's European elections.

EU Commission skirts Italy sanctions on Roma evictions

The European Commission, as guardian of the treaties, declines to sanction Italy's treatment of the Roma following a forced eviction on Thursday of some 300 from a camp in the outskirts of the Italian capital.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. ACCACompany Law Package: Making the Best of Digital and Cross Border Mobility,
  2. IPHRCivil Society Worried About Shortcomings in EU-Kyrgyzstan Human Rights Dialogue
  3. UNESDAThe European Soft Drinks Industry Supports over 1.7 Million Jobs
  4. Mission of China to the EUJointly Building Belt and Road Initiative Leads to a Better Future for All
  5. IPHRCivil society asks PACE to appoint Rapporteur to probe issue of political prisoners in Azerbaijan
  6. ACCASocial Mobility – How Can We Increase Opportunities Through Training and Education?
  7. Nordic Council of MinistersEnergy Solutions for a Greener Tomorrow
  8. UNICEFWhat Kind of Europe Do Children Want? Unicef & Eurochild Launch Survey on the Europe Kids Want
  9. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Countries Take a Stand for Climate-Smart Energy Solutions
  10. Mission of China to the EUChina: Work Together for a Better Globalisation
  11. Nordic Council of MinistersNordics Could Be First Carbon-Negative Region in World
  12. European Federation of Allergy and AirwaysLife Is Possible for Patients with Severe Asthma

Latest News

  1. EU gets record response on 'summertime' consultation
  2. 'Nativism' and the upcoming Swedish and Bavarian elections
  3. Former Malta opposition leader fears for his life
  4. Women shun EU-funded site for female entrepreneurs
  5. Building a Europe more resilient to terrorism
  6. Brexit talks resume as chance of 'no deal' put at 50:50
  7. US trial sheds light on murky Cyprus-Russia links
  8. Burned cars fuel Swedish election debate

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. PKEE - Polish Energy AssociationCommon-Sense Approach Needed for EU Energy Reform
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Region to Lead in Developing and Rolling Out 5G Network
  3. Mission of China to the EUChina-EU Economic and Trade Relations Enjoy a Bright Future
  4. ACCAEmpowering Businesses to Engage with Sustainable Finance and the SDGs
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersCooperation in Nordic Electricity Market Considered World Class Model
  6. FIFAGreen Stadiums at the 2018 Fifa World Cup
  7. Mission of China to the EUChina and EU Work Together to Promote Sustainable Development
  8. Counter BalanceEuropean Ombudsman Requests More Lending Transparency from European Investment Bank
  9. FIFARecycling at the FIFA World Cup in Russia
  10. Nordic Council of MinistersOECD Report: Gender Equality Boosts GDP Growth in Nordic Region
  11. Centre Maurits Coppieters“Peace and Reconciliation Is a Process That Takes Decades” Dr. Anthony Soares on #Brexit and Northern Ireland
  12. Mission of China to the EUMEPs Positive on China’s New Measures of Opening Up

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Macedonian Human Rights MovementOld White Men are Destroying Macedonia by Romanticizing Greece
  2. Counter BalanceControversial EIB-Backed Project Under Fire at European Parliament
  3. Nordic Council of MinistersIncome Inequality Increasing in Nordic Countries
  4. European Jewish CongressEU Leaders to Cease Contact with Mahmoud Abbas Until He Apologizes for Antisemitic Comments
  5. International Partnership for Human RightsAnnual Report celebrates organization’s tenth anniversary
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Cooperation Needed on Green Exports and Funding
  7. Mission of China to the EUPremier Li Confirms China Will Continue to Open Up
  8. European Jewish CongressCalls on Brussels University to Revoke Decision to Honour Ken Loach
  9. Nordic Council of Ministers12 Recommendations for Nordic Leadership on Climate and Environment
  10. Macedonian Human Rights MovementOxford Professor Calls for an End to the Anti-Macedonian Name Negotiations
  11. ACCAPeople Who Speak-Up Should Feel Safe to Do So
  12. Mission of China to the EUProgress on China-EU Cooperation

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us