Wednesday

30th Sep 2020

Coronavirus

Coronavirus: Spain's lockdown will 'last more than 15 days'

  • The Spanish government warned that any company that can produce diagnosis material and protective equipment, such as mask, glasses or gloves, must contact the authorities within 48 hours - under the threat of fines (Photo: Nacho Rascón)

Spain's streets have turned eerily empty since the government declared the state of emergency and imposed a nationwide lockdown for two weeks - aiming to stop the spread of the coronavirus in the country.

However, the Spanish minister for transport, José Luis Ábalos, warned on Monday (16 March) that the lockdown will "last more than 15 days" since this period would not alone be enough for the country to "win the battle" against the coronavirus.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Become an expert on Europe

Get instant access to all articles — and 20 years of archives. 14-day free trial.

... or subscribe as a group

As of Monday, 7,988 cases of Covid-19 and 294 deaths were registered in Spain, the second-most affected country in Europe after Italy - overtaking the larger nations of France and Germany.

Following the measures taken by Italy - the most affected country in Europe - Spain declared a state of emergency on Saturday which places tight restrictions on movement with exceptions for primary needs or professional requirements.

"We will eventually return to the routine of our jobs and again visit our friends and loved ones," prime minister Pedro Sanchez said in a nationally-televised conference.

"Until that time comes, let's not waste energies that are essential now. Let's not lose our way," he added, urging all to stay home.

Those disobeying the conditions of the state of alert could face fines starting from €100 or imprisonment should they "resist or seriously disobey the authorities or officers when they are carrying out their functions".

In Madrid alone, law enforcement imposed over 200 fines on Sunday.

Nationalisation

On Sunday, the minister for health, Salvador Illa, announced that all private health providers and infrastructure would be temporarily taken over in the interest of the national healthcare system.

The government also mobilised retired doctors, all last-year medical students who are carrying out residencies and physicians who have not yet completed their speciality to guarantee the "existence of professionals to attend all of those who are affected by this virus".

Given the current shortages of anti-virus gear, the Spanish government also warned that any company that can produce diagnosis material and protective equipment, such as mask, glasses or gloves, must contact the authorities within 48 hours - under the threat of fines.

Spain is also taking part in an accelerated joint procurement procedure, which is being coordinated by the European Commission to ensure an adequate supply of protective equipment across member states.

Military forces are prepared to deploy and operate emergency health facilities, such as field hospitals, in the most affected areas of the country, Spanish newspaper El Mundo reports.

Additionally, all educative centres, non-essential shops, bars, cafes, restaurants, stadiums, cinemas and museums have been closed since Saturday.

But supermarkets, pharmacies, newsstands and hairdressers are among the businesses that are allowed to remain open.

In Madrid, police drive around the city using megaphones to warn residents to stay indoors for their security.

Teleworking doesn't work for everyone

Teleworking is possible for those businesses that can function through the screen of a computer, but many companies are only partly implementing this option.

"In many cases, the programmes used by civil servants, small and medium enterprises have licenses - and access to the programmes is not always possible," an IT staff member of a multinational warned.

On Saturday, the transport minister announced that public transport by air, sea and motorway would be reduced by 50 percent.

As a result, public transportation in big cities, such as Madrid, Barcelona or Bilbao, was more crowded than on a typical Monday morning rush hour, forcing people into proximity to one another.

Some employees, who are not able to work from home, are forced to take holidays - and others have been fired, especially those working in hospitality.

"As small clinics are not forced to close, my boss has given two option to his employees: go to work or take holidays," said physiotherapist Arancha Garcia.

The Spanish government failed on Saturday to agree on a new package of economic measures to mitigate the impact of coronavirus - although they are expected later this week.

Meanwhile, the region of Catalonia and Basque Country continue to resist the centralisation of power and competencies derived from the decreed state of emergency.

Spain on Monday closed its borders to contain the coronavirus - following the Czech Republic, Cyprus, Denmark, Hungary, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, and Slovakia. Germany and others also partly closed borders.

Already doubts over Belgium's new 'anti-corona government'

Belgium's King Philippe has given interim prime minister Sophie Wilmès the task of forming a government, after seven opposition parties agreed to support it. The agreement came after a political drama - and there are doubts if it will hold.

Analysis

Coronavirus: Lessons from Italy

What are Italy's mistakes and achievements in the fight against Covid-19? What are the biggest challenges? What are the citizens' greatest concerns? And how are people reacting?

Spain prays to reach peak of pandemic this week

This week Spain hopes it may see the longed-for 'peak' of the epidemic - if measures taken so far prove to be effective in the fight against the coronavirus. Yet the government is set to extend lockdown until 11 April.

Africa wary of European tourists spreading virus

Cases of European tourists bringing the virus to African states has roused fears of contagion, as some seek to avoid self-isolation, regardless of the pandemic caused by Covid-19.

News in Brief

  1. Spanish court defenestrates Catalan leader
  2. Report: EU helped Taiwan on name dispute
  3. Belarusian writer goes to Germany for treatment
  4. Rapid Covid-19 tests for developing world imminent
  5. Dutch advised against 'non-essential' travel to Belgium
  6. Covid-19 hit Roma community hard, report finds
  7. Merkel visited Navalny in Berlin hospital
  8. EU's new raw materials strategy 'threatens' climate action

Opinion

Italy has a responsibility, too

Little wonder the leaders of Austria, Denmark, the Netherlands and Sweden are unwilling to sign off: they're not going to give money so the Italians can fund a tax cut in the middle of an economic crisis.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Council meets Belarusian opposition leader Svetlana Tichanovskaja
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Region to invest DKK 250 million in green digitalised business sector
  3. UNESDAReducing packaging waste – a huge opportunity for circularity
  4. Nordic Council of MinistersCOVID-19 halts the 72nd Session of the Nordic Council in Iceland
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersCivil society a key player in integration
  6. UNESDANext generation Europe should be green and circular

Latest News

  1. EU tries to avoid lockdowns as global death toll reaches 1m
  2. Reports: Turkey sent Syrian fighters to Azerbaijan
  3. German presidency tries to end EU's rule-of-law battle
  4. 'Sponsored returns' may shuffle failed asylum seekers around EU
  5. German wins election to be mayor of Romania's third city
  6. Minsk on the edge means whole Eastern Partnership is at risk
  7. Caucasus warfare prompts EU alarm
  8. Summit reloaded and last Brexit round This WEEK

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersNEW REPORT: Eight in ten people are concerned about climate change
  2. UNESDAHow reducing sugar and calories in soft drinks makes the healthier choice the easy choice
  3. Nordic Council of MinistersGreen energy to power Nordic start after Covid-19
  4. European Sustainable Energy WeekThis year’s EU Sustainable Energy Week (EUSEW) will be held digitally!
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic states are fighting to protect gender equality during corona crisis
  6. UNESDACircularity works, let’s all give it a chance

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us