Wednesday

28th Jul 2021

Slovenia causing headaches for new EU anti-graft office

The new European-wide public prosecutor office says Slovenia risks making its work more onerous.

Set up to probe financial fraud of the EU budget, which is estimated at €60bn a year, the Luxembourg-based office will be launching its first investigations in June.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Become an expert on Europe

Get instant access to all articles — and 20 years of archives. 14-day free trial.

... or subscribe as a group

The European Public Prosecutor Office (EPPO) is headed by Laura Codruta Kovesi, a Romanian with a domestic reputation for cracking down on corruption.

In a tweet earlier this week, Kovesi accused Slovenia of "manifest lack of sincere cooperation" following delays over the recruitment of delegated prosecutors.

The EPPO is composed of a European chief prosecutor, European prosecutors, and European delegated prosecutors.

The delegated prosecutors, sourced from the participating member states, are tasked with investigations, prosecution, and bringing to judgement cases.

Slovenia has yet to put forward their candidates for the post - despite having finalised procedures in early December.

Slovenia selects those candidates internally. The names are then sent by the ministry of justice to the European chief prosecutor for approval.

But no names have come forward, causing headaches for the operational launch of the EPPO on 1 June. Extra time is needed to also train and equip those nominated to the post.

EPPO spokesperson Tine Hollevoet said the deadline for Slovenia has since passed, meaning they may now have to start short of staff.

"From a practical point of view, it makes our job even more difficult than it already is," she said, in an email on Tuesday (11 May).

"We have to rearrange our internal organisation to compensate for the missing European delegated prosecutors in Slovenia," she added.

Slovenia is not the only EU state that has yet to send candidates. Cyprus, Finland, Greece, and Luxembourg are also stalling.

But the EPPO says they know those candidates will be arriving shortly. "For Slovenia, we do not know," said Hollevoet.

Asked about the delays, a Slovenian government spokesperson said it had already ensured legislation, financial and human resources as well as premises for the functioning of the EPPO in Slovenia.

"Like other participating member states, Slovenia will also nominate its European delegated prosecutors. The procedures related to their nomination are at this point still ongoing," he said, in an email post publication of this article.

Slovenia itself will be taking over the six-month rotating EU presidency in July.

Twenty-two out of the 27 EU states have signed up to the EPPO. Hungary, Poland, Sweden, Denmark and Ireland have so far refused to join.

This article was updated at 10:24 on 17 May, 2021 with a response from the Slovenian government

Cyprus: a heavy caseload for new EU prosecutors office

The new European Public Prosecutor's office will become operational in March. It is tasked to carry out criminal fraud investigations of the EU budget. But of the 140 required European delegated prosecutors, only nine have so far set up office.

Agenda

Slovenia takes the EU steering wheel This WEEK

While Slovenian prime minister Janey Janša will not have an impact on the day-to-day operations on the presidency, the platform it gives to the increasingly bellicose PM has been a cause for concern.

Slovenia risks court over EU anti-graft office

Slovenian foot-dragging on the appointment of prosecutors to a new EU anti-graft office may trigger a decision by the European Commission to take it to court. Slovenia's prime minister Janez Janša said they would be appointed by autumn.

Slovenia takes over EU presidency amid wave of criticism

Slovenia formally assumed the six-month rotating presidency of the European Council on Thursday (1 July) - amid criticism against its right-wing prime minister Janez Janša for allegadly undermining the rule of law and democratic values in the EU.

Feature

'Prison island' birthplace of EU reborn as think-tank venue

Santo Stefano is being revived through a €70m refurbishment project to turn it into a high-level European think-tank, academy and open-air museum aimed at boosting the European integration project by training 'enlightened' EU youth, scholars and politicians.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersNineteen demands by Nordic young people to save biodiversity
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersSustainable public procurement is an effective way to achieve global goals
  3. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Council enters into formal relations with European Parliament
  4. Nordic Council of MinistersWomen more active in violent extremist circles than first assumed
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersDigitalisation can help us pick up the green pace
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersCOVID19 is a wake-up call in the fight against antibiotic resistance

Latest News

  1. EU hits vaccination target, as Delta variant now dominates
  2. European arms 'displaced over a million people', research finds
  3. Brexit: what is the 'Lugano Convention' and does it matter?
  4. US maintains summer travel ban on EU tourists
  5. Does democracy need troublemakers?
  6. Separating migrant families at EU borders must stop
  7. Germany mulls restrictions for unvaccinated as cases soar
  8. 'Prison island' birthplace of EU reborn as think-tank venue

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us