Sunday

20th Aug 2017

EU doing well in global energy ranking

  • Swiss nuclear plant. Switzerland comes out top at the World Economic Forum's annual energy ranking (Photo: Fomal Haut)

The European Union is dominating the World Economic Forum's annual Global Energy Architecture Performance Index, published on Wednesday (22 March).

This year, fourteen of the twenty best-scoring countries are members of the European Union – two more than in 2016.

Thank you for reading EUobserver!

Subscribe now and get 40% off for an annual subscription. Sale ends soon.

  1. €90 per year. Use discount code EUOBS40%
  2. or €15 per month
  3. Cancel anytime

EUobserver is an independent, not-for-profit news organization that publishes daily news reports, analysis, and investigations from Brussels and the EU member states. We are an indispensable news source for anyone who wants to know what is going on in the EU.

We are mainly funded by advertising and subscription revenues. As advertising revenues are falling fast, we depend on subscription revenues to support our journalism.

For group, corporate or student subscriptions, please contact us. See also our full Terms of Use.

If you already have an account click here to login.

The index gives points for eighteen different energy-related categories, on issues such as: the levels of diversity and quality in the energy supply, or the volume of CO2 emissions.

The ranking is topped by non-EU members Switzerland (1) and Norway (2). The top-7 are all European countries: Sweden (3), Denmark (4), France (5), Austria (6), and Spain (7).

The list's methodology included eighteen indicators that quantified the countries' contributions to economic growth and development, environmental sustainability, and energy access and security.

EU countries, such as: Portugal (11), Finland (12), Slovenia (13), United Kingdom (15), Ireland (16), Latvia (17), Croatia (18), Germany (19), and Slovakia (20), also performed well.

The report stated that Europe's “strong performance is underpinned by advantages gained through a long history of coordination between European nations, which is a model for regional cooperation”.

The report was published by the Swiss-based foundation, the World Economic Forum, best-known for its annual meeting in Davos.

The authors recognised that the index “cannot fully reflect the complexity of energy systems or of managing energy transitions”, but could work as “a basis for comparison across nations”.

For the third year in a row, Switzerland received top marks and was put in first-place because it had “a diverse supply mix, low-energy intensity and low carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from electricity production”.

Norway was praised for “energy access and security”, while Sweden scored well on environmental sustainability.

“From being heavily reliant on oil in the 1970s to achieving one of the highest shares of renewables across the EU, it has reached 50% of consumption from renewable energy before the 2020 deadline,” the report said about Sweden.

Most EU countries were in the 40 highest ranked countries, of 127, with only Estonia (56), Cyprus (67), and Malta (71) performing less well.

Several non-EU European countries outperformed those lower ranked EU member states - with Albania in 25th place, and Iceland in 26th.

EU tables energy 'mega-package'

Energy Union commissioner Maros Sefcovic calls on member states to rally behind a bundle of proposals to increase energy efficiency that runs to more than 1,000 pages.

EU fixes own mistake on 'confusing' energy labels

UPDATED: MEPs approved a new system to inform consumers about the energy efficiency of products. The most important change is abolishing the most recent change to a scale that goes up to A+++.

US prevents G7 energy statement

The United States did not sign a joint statement at a G7 summit on energy because it did not want to include a reference to the Paris climate agreement.

Column / Crude World

Why China and Russia will be best frenemies forever

Russia and China bond over anti-Western rhetoric and the shared interest of keeping the US at bay, but beyond that, there is little that binds Moscow and Beijing together.

News in Brief

  1. Macedonia sacks top prosecutor over wiretap scandal
  2. ECB concerned stronger euro could derail economic recovery
  3. Mixed Irish reactions to post-Brexit border proposal
  4. European Union returns to 2 percent growth
  5. Russian power most feared in Europe
  6. Ireland continues to refuse €13 billion in back taxes from Apple
  7. UK unemployment lowest since 1975
  8. Europe facing 'explosive cocktail' in its backyard, report warns

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. European Healthy Lifestyle AllianceDoes Genetics Explain Why So Few of Us Have an Ideal Cardiovascular Health?
  2. EU2017EEFuture-Themed Digital Painting Competition Welcomes Artists - Deadline 31 Aug
  3. ACCABusinesses Must Grip Ethics and Trust in the Digital Age
  4. European Jewish CongressEJC Welcomes European Court of Justice's Decision to Keep Hamas on Terror List
  5. UNICEFReport: Children on the Move From Africa Do Not First Aim to Go to Europe
  6. Centre Maurits CoppietersWe Need Democratic and Transparent Free Trade Agreements Says MEP Jordi Solé
  7. Counter BalanceOut for Summer, Ep. 2: EIB Promoting Development in Egypt - At What Cost?
  8. EU2017EELocal Leaders Push for Local and Regional Targets to Address Climate Change
  9. European Healthy Lifestyle AllianceMore Women Than Men Have Died From Heart Disease in Past 30 Years
  10. European Jewish CongressJean-Marie Le Pen Faces Trial for Oven Comments About Jewish Singer
  11. ACCAAnnounces Belt & Road Research at Shanghai Conference
  12. ECPAFood Waste in the Field Can Double Without Crop Protection. #WithOrWithout #Pesticides