Tuesday

16th Aug 2022

Von der Leyen's final appeal to secure top EU post

For some 40 minutes, the European Commission presidential-hopeful Ursula von Der Leyen delivered a speech at the European Parliament in the hope of securing her post.

In a packed plenary chamber in Strasbourg, von der Leyen on Tuesday (16 July) first shook the hands of the group leaders and then launched into a speech that shifted from French, English and to German.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Become an expert on Europe

Get instant access to all articles — and 20 years of archives. 14-day free trial.

... or subscribe as a group

In what she hopes will convince the more sceptical MEPs of her candidacy to become next European Commission president, von der Leyen made sweeping policy and proposals ranging on a new Green deal to fight climate in her first 100 days office, womens' rights, migration, child poverty, the economy, and rule of law.

She noted that there have been 183 commissioners since 1958, of which only 35 were women.

"We represent half the population, we want our fair share," she said, noting that one-in-five women have suffered violence in the European Union.

"I will propose to add violence against women on the list of EU crimes defined in the Treaty and European Union should join the Istanbul convention," she said.

Although von der Leyen appeared to be obtaining greater support in the lead-up to the speech from the centre-right European People's Party (EPP), the liberal Renew Europe, and the Socialists and Democrats (S&D), she still hopes to win over the Greens and the conservative European Conservatives and Reformists (ECR) when it comes to the secret vote later this evening.

"We are going to have to fight, we are going to have to rise up for this Europe of ours, the whole world is called upon with disruptive elements apace" she said, noting that the some countries are turning towards authoritarian regimes and protectionism.

"None of these are options are for us," she said, laying out a vision of Europe based on solidarity she claims is rooted in Simone Veil, the late, first, and only, female president of any of the EU institutions.

But the spectre of von der Leyen's nomination outside the parliament's preferred system of lead candidacy ('Spitzenkandidaten'), as well as her support from far-right and populist governments in Hungary and Poland has tainted her support among the more pro-EU political group factions.

Von der Leyen made no reference to unresolved controversies surrounding her past as Germany's defence ministry, an issue that was not widely debated.

As for the content, she agreed that the European parliament should have the right to initiative, moved to have foreign affairs issues decided by a vote instead of unanimity among member states, and called for a relaunch of the EU's asylum and migration reforms.

The Green appeal

She appealed to the Greens by saying that Europe's most pressing challenge is "keeping our planet healthy."

"This is the greatest opportunity and challenge of our times," she said, pointing out that Europe needs to become the first climate neutral continent in the world by 2050.

"The current goal of reducing emissions by 40 percent by 2030 is not enough, we must go further, we must strive for more," she said, calling for a two-step approach to reduce emissions by up to 55 percent.

Among her plans is a 'Green Deal for Europe' in her first 100 days in office, that includes a first ever European climate law to legally-bind the 2050 deadline on emissions.

The deal includes a "European sustainable investment plan" to unlock some €1tn over the next decade through a climate bank.

But the Greens remain unconvinced on her proposals to curb climate emissions.

Green co-president Philippe Lamberts said her speech and the documents to support it "was a big step forward" given her failure last week to convince the group.

"I was delighted to her you say that you are personally committed to reducing by 2030 our CO2 emissions by half, you have taken up the Green idea of a carbon tax on our borders," he said.

But Lamberts said it still falls short, noting that a conditionality was emerging in her two-step plan to cut those emissions by 2030.

"Your ambitions fall short because of entrenched interests" he said, in a likely reference to the powerful German car industry.

The Socialist and Liberal dance

Iraxte Garcia Perez, the socialist group leader, appeared more supportive, noting that Von Der Leyen's ideas "are moving in the right direction".

"We don't want any kind of institutional crisis that will just further delay the changes Europe needs to see," she said.

Perez said binding objectives are needed to cut emissions by 2030, an investment plan for a sustainable Europe, economic flexibility and an European employment guarantee.

"Our political group will always support the European social pillar and more specifically, the child guarantee and the youth guarantee," she said, noting that socialists also back a directive on issues to improve the situation of workers.

Dacian Ciolos, the group leader of Renew Europe (the former Alde liberal group), made similar comments.

"The deal that you put forward today is a clear one and the pro-Europeans will certainly be giving you support," he said.

Ciolos praised von der Leyen for including a so-called Conference for the Future of Europe, a brainchild of French president Emmanuel Macron.

Poland's ex-PM loses EU parliament chair again

Poland's former prime minister, Beata Szydlo, has cried foul after failing to get an EP committee chair a second time, in a fiasco which could spell trouble for the European Commission presidency vote on Tuesday.

Von der Leyen's EU vote far from sure

Unhappy socialist and liberal MEPs could upset German's bid to be next EU commission chief, making an even worse mess in the top jobs system.

EU commission has first-ever woman president

Ursula von der Leyen on Tuesday obtained a narrow majority of support in the European Parliament to become the first-ever female president of the European Commission.

Analysis

Von der Leyen faces gender battle for commission posts

The first-ever female president of the European Commission wants half of her team of commissioners to consist of women. But most of the commissioners put forward by EU member states so far have been male.

Column

Albania's post-communist dream has lessons for Ukraine

Comparisons between post-communist Albania and current-day Ukraine are fascinating — and make many pertinent parallels. Ukrainians have a similar determination to belong to "the rest of Europe" as Albanians.

Opinion

Finally, the victims of Utøya got a memorial

A legal battle between locals on the one hand and the state and the labour youth organisation on the other side postponed the inception of the memorial in remembrance of the victims of Anders Behring Breivik.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic prime ministers: “We will deepen co-operation on defence”
  2. EFBWW – EFBH – FETBBConstruction workers can check wages and working conditions in 36 countries
  3. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic and Canadian ministers join forces to combat harmful content online
  4. European Centre for Press and Media FreedomEuropean Anti-SLAPP Conference 2022
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic ministers write to EU about new food labelling
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersEmerging journalists from the Nordics and Canada report the facts of the climate crisis

Latest News

  1. Germany rejects visa ban for Russian tourists
  2. Iran responds to EU's 'final text' on nuclear deal
  3. Model minority myths
  4. EU must make public who really owns its fishing fleets
  5. Germany needs to cut gas use by 20% to stave off winter crisis
  6. Europe's wildfire destruction set to hit new record
  7. How Putin and Erdoğan are making the West irrelevant
  8. Defying Russian bombs, Ukraine football starts 2022 season

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us