Thursday

24th Jun 2021

EU dismayed as Lukashenko 'terrorises' media

  • Families watch play in courtyard in Minsk put on by opposition arts group Belarus Free Theatre (Photo: belarusfreetheatre.com)

Belarus has attacked its last few independent journalists in raids that prompted an international outcry.

Police broke into the offices of the Belarusian Association of Journalists (BAJ) and the Belarusian Radio and Electronic Industry Workers' Union (REP) in Minsk on grounds of searching for illicit funding on Tuesday morning (16 February).

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Become an expert on Europe

Get instant access to all articles — and 20 years of archives. 14-day free trial.

... or subscribe as a group

They went into the private homes of several journalists in Brest, Homel, Mahilyou, Minsk, and Vitebsk, including well-known freelancers Larisa Shchyrakova and Anatoly Gotovchits.

They also raided two human rights NGOs, Viasna and Belarusian Human Rights House, which provide independent information, for instance on regime crimes and protest crowd sizes, to international press.

And they detained about 30 people, most of whom were later released.

"This is the largest crackdown ever on journalists and rights activists Europe has ever seen," Boris Goretsky, the BAJ's vice-president said.

"There have been more than 400 detentions of journalists over the last six months, and the authorities aren't going to stop at that," he added, following months of pro-democracy protests after rigged elections last August.

"The authorities are clearly sending a message that they will not stop the crackdown ... despite the West's pressure," Maryia Sadouskaya-Komlac, a Belarusian journalist who works with Free Press Unlimited, a Dutch-based NGO, said.

"Despite years of repression, the Belarusian independent media sector remained high quality, diverse, and professional - but its very existence is now under threat," she said.

The Brussels-based European Federation of Journalists and International Federation of Journalists as well as UK-based charity Amnesty International voiced solidarity.

"This is clearly a centrally organised and targeted attempt to decimate the country's independent media ... through terrifying home raids," Amnesty's Aisha Jung said.

The EU and the Council of Europe joined the outcry.

Tuesday's attacks were a "complete violation of ... fundamental freedoms, human rights and the rule of law," an EU foreign service spokesman said.

"Hundreds of politically motivated trials have taken place. Belarusians have been denied the most basic rights, including the right to fair trial, and the right to humane treatment in custody," he added.

"Hundreds of documented cases of torture have been collected to date," he said.

The EU has already blacklisted 84 people, including Belarus president Alexander Lukashenko and his eldest son, as well as seven entities, over the events.

It recently targeted a handful of oligarchs and companies that feed the regime money.

It has stopped short of economic sanctions, for instance on Belarusian petroleum or fertiliser exports, amid concern that too much pressure could push Belarus into a state union with Russia.

But it has said its blacklist remained under constant review, with potentially "hundreds" more names to add, as EU foreign ministers meet to discuss neighbourhood crises next Monday.

Interview

Belarus threatens to kill two UK dissidents

British citizenship and international awards are not enough to make Belarusian dissident Natalia Kaliada feel safe after a high-profile death threat.

News in Brief

  1. Gay-rights activist storms pitch at Hungary's Euro game
  2. UK defies Russian military over Crimea
  3. Delta variant to be 'predominant in EU by end-August'
  4. EU domestic banks need climate-risk plans
  5. Report: France and Germany want EU-Russia summit
  6. New EU rules on shipping fuels dubbed 'disastrous'
  7. Japan government proposes four-day working week
  8. US: Nord Stream 2 undermines Ukraine's security

Opinion

Why Russia politics threaten European security

Russia could expand hostile operations, such as poisonings, including beyond its borders, if it feels an "existential" threat and there is no European pushback.

Analysis

Ten years on from Tahrir: EU's massive missed opportunity

Investing in the Arab world, in a smart way, is also investing in the European Union's future itself. Let's hope that the disasters of the last decade help to shape the neighbourhood policy of the next 10 years.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersNineteen demands by Nordic young people to save biodiversity
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersSustainable public procurement is an effective way to achieve global goals
  3. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Council enters into formal relations with European Parliament
  4. Nordic Council of MinistersWomen more active in violent extremist circles than first assumed
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersDigitalisation can help us pick up the green pace
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersCOVID19 is a wake-up call in the fight against antibiotic resistance

Latest News

  1. EU talks migration over dinner, as NGO rescue-ship sets sail
  2. EU enlargement still 'hopelessly stuck'
  3. EU creates new cyber unit, after wave of online attacks
  4. How NOT to frame debate about Hungary's toxic anti-gay law
  5. What a post-Netanyahu Israel means for EU
  6. EU Commission warns Hungary over anti-LGBTIQ measures
  7. Fourteen EU countries condemn Hungary over anti-LGBTIQ law
  8. EU preparing to lift Burundi sanctions, despite warning

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us