Friday

8th Dec 2023

ECB chief indicates upcoming help for Spain

  • "The euro is like a bumblebee. This is a mystery of nature because it shouldn’t fly but instead it does," says Draghi (Photo: guysie)

Markets rallied after European Central Bank chief Mario Draghi on Thursday (26 July) pledged to do "whatever it takes" to salvage the euro and suggested the bank may buy more government bonds.

"Within our mandate, the ECB is ready to do whatever it takes to preserve the euro. And believe me, it will be enough," he said during a conference in London.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Become an expert on Europe

Get instant access to all articles — and 20 years of archives. 14-day free trial.

... or subscribe as a group

Among these tools is a bond purchasing programme which had stalled this year after it helped to lower the borrowing costs of Italy and Spain in 2011.

Spain this week paid a euro-area record rate of 7.6 percent on its ten year bonds, despite the announcement of a eurozone bailout of up to €100 billion for its banks and more spending cuts worth €65 billion.

Draghi explained that as long as countries are paying higher interest rates than they should based on "factors" they can control, the ECB can intervene.

"To the extent that the size of these sovereign premia hampers the functioning of the monetary policy transmission channel, they come within our mandate," he said.

His remarks mark a shift suggesting the ECB board next week may decide to resume the bond-purchasing programme that saw the ECB spend €210 billion on government bonds since May 2010.

The policy shift is not unexpected, however. The International Monetary Fund in recent weeks has suggested the ECB should intervene more forcefully to salvage the euro as it has enough tools to do so. And foreign diplomats Brussels earlier this month spoke of a "studied choreography" between EU governments and the ECB - first they have to do something for the bank to follow up with something in return.

Draghi indicated that this stage of the euro crisis - where market have lost confidence that the currency can work in the long run with so many divergent economies - it is important for leaders in the 17 euro countries to adhere to a long-term plan leading to a true economic and political union.

"The euro is like a bumblebee. This is a mystery of nature because it shouldn’t fly but instead it does," he said.

"So the euro was a bumblebee that flew very well for several years (...) Now something must have changed in the air, and we know what after the financial crisis. The bumblebee would have to graduate to a real bee. And that’s what it’s doing."

The fundamentals of the eurozone are good, said the ECB chief, less inflation, less deficit and less debt than in the US or Japan.

With governments starting to reform their economies and at the same time work towards a true fiscal, economic and political union, "the euro is irreversible."

Euro-saving operations due within 'days,' says Juncker

Eurogroup chief Juncker has said there is "no time to lose," as the world talks about a eurozone breakup, with joint action by the European Central Bank and the eurozone bailout funds expected in the coming days.

Spain's Nadia Calviño backed to be EIB's first female chief

With less than a month to go before the start of a new leadership of the European Investment Bank, the world's largest multilateral lender, the path seems finally clear for one of the candidates, Spanish finance minister Nadia Calviño.

Analysis

Is there hope for the EU and eurozone?

While some strengths may have been overlooked recently, leading to a more pessimistic outlook on the EU and the euro area than the truly deserve, are there reasons for optimism?

Latest News

  1. How Moldova is trying to control tuberculosis
  2. Many problems to solve in Dubai — honesty about them is good
  3. Sudanese fleeing violence find no haven in Egypt or EU
  4. How should EU reform the humanitarian aid system?
  5. EU suggests visa-bans on Israeli settlers, following US example
  6. EU ministers prepare for all-night fiscal debate
  7. Spain's Nadia Calviño backed to be EIB's first female chief
  8. Is there hope for the EU and eurozone?

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersArtist Jessie Kleemann at Nordic pavilion during UN climate summit COP28
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersCOP28: Gathering Nordic and global experts to put food and health on the agenda
  3. Friedrich Naumann FoundationPoems of Liberty – Call for Submission “Human Rights in Inhume War”: 250€ honorary fee for selected poems
  4. World BankWorld Bank report: How to create a future where the rewards of technology benefit all levels of society?
  5. Georgia Ministry of Foreign AffairsThis autumn Europalia arts festival is all about GEORGIA!
  6. UNOPSFostering health system resilience in fragile and conflict-affected countries

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us