Friday

18th Jan 2019

EU adopts Blue Card scheme for skilled migrants

  • The EU tries to attract high-skilled foreigners on its labour market. (Photo: European Commission)

The EU on Monday (25 May) adopted plans for a European Union work permit aimed at attracting highly skilled foreigners to the bloc, similar to the US' Green Card.

Dubbed the Blue Card, it will allow foreign workers to be employed in any EU member state except Great Britain, Ireland and Denmark and enjoy limited social and welfare rights for themselves and their family members for a renewable period from one to four years.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Support quality EU news

Get instant access to all articles — and 18 year's of archives. 30 days free trial.

... or join as a group

The 24 member states who have signed up for the scheme will have two years to transpose it into national law.

They will grant Blue Card holders equal treatment with nationals when it comes to "working conditions, including pay and dismissal", recognition of qualifications, the right to participate in trade unions and limited social security and pension rights, as well as access to housing and counselling.

The permit allows for restricted movement between member states. "After 18 months of legal residence in the first member state as an EU Blue Card holder, the person concerned and his family members may move, under certain conditions, to a member state other than the first member state for the purpose of highly qualified employment," the text reads.

The original proposal, initially tabled in 2007 by the European Commission, was watered down after concerns by member states that it would allow Brussels to interfere too much in their national labour markets.

New member states also pointed out that the Blue Card would discriminate against their own workers, who still face restrictions in some old member states like Germany.

Punishment for hiring illegal immigrants

The directive was formally adopted at a ministerial meeting on Monday in Brussels. The EU ministers also approved a set of common standards and sanctions against employers – both individuals and companies - who illegally hire foreign immigrants.

The new rules aim to "put an end to abuses by unscrupulous employers who make contracts with illegally-staying [workers] providing them in the labour market with low salaries and poor labour conditions."

They require employers to ensure that their non-EU workers hold a valid residence permit and keep a copy of that document for inspection. Employers will also be obliged to notify national authorities when they hire a non-EU national.

Failure to comply will mean fines "which will increase in amount according to the number of illegally employed foreigners" as well as the payment of the return costs for the illegal non-EU employees.

A harsher sanction could see employers of illegal workers excluded from public funding schemes and participation in public tenders.

'Blue card' to attract top talent from outside EU

As part of efforts to fulfil Europe's need for highly-qualified workers, Brussels is set to issue an EU-wide work permit allowing employment to non-Europeans, in any country within the 27-nation bloc, EU home affairs commissioner Franco Frattini said in an interview with EUobserver.

EU work permit 'blue card' faces opposition

The European Commission plan to attract non-EU workers has run into difficulties, as several member states question whether Brussels' bureaucracy should play a role in this sensitive area.

Blue Card policy bad for EU schools, expert says

EU governments will tend to invest less in education if they can "import" high skilled workers from third countries through the so-called "Blue Card" scheme, aimed at matching the US Green Card, Aristide Zolberg, a professor at New York's New School University said at a conference in Brussels.

EU to overhaul 'Blue Card' work permit for migrants

The EU is keen to overhaul its "blue card" system to attract migrants to come and work in the bloc amid fears of the longterm economic consequences of a population that is living longer and having fewer children.

EU to ease access for skilled migrants

EU planning to revive its US-type scheme for admitting skilled workers from overseas, underlies that ageing EU societies need young foreigners.

Germany led way on EU human rights protection

Germany led the way on protection of human rights this year, but Hungary, Italy, and Poland "undermined the EU's moral standing" on the world stage, a leading NGO said.

News in Brief

  1. EU trade commissioner asks for green light for US talks
  2. Slovakia's commissioner takes unpaid leave to run for presidency
  3. Minority elects Lofven as prime minister of Sweden
  4. Putin opposes EU prospects of Serbia and Kosovo
  5. Tsipras launches campaign to ratify Macedonia deal
  6. US-EU meeting in doubt after Trump cancels plane
  7. Germany and China to sign pact on finance cooperation
  8. Labour divided on second Brexit vote plan

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. International Partnership For Human RightsKyrgyz authorities have to immediately release human rights defender Azimjon Askarov
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersSeminar on disability and user involvement
  3. Nordic Council of MinistersInternational appetite for Nordic food policies
  4. Nordic Council of MinistersNew Nordic Innovation House in Hong Kong
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Region has chance to become world leader when it comes to start-ups
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersTheresa May: “We will not be turning our backs on the Nordic region”
  7. International Partnership for Human RightsOpen letter to Emmanuel Macron ahead of Uzbek president's visit
  8. International Partnership for Human RightsRaising key human rights concerns during visit of Turkmenistan's foreign minister
  9. Nordic Council of MinistersState of the Nordic Region presented in Brussels
  10. Nordic Council of MinistersThe vital bioeconomy. New issue of “Sustainable Growth the Nordic Way” out now
  11. Nordic Council of MinistersThe Nordic gender effect goes international
  12. Nordic Council of MinistersPaula Lehtomaki from Finland elected as the Council's first female Secretary General

Latest News

  1. Germany led way on EU human rights protection
  2. How to troll the European Parliament elections
  3. MEPs in Strasbourg: everywhere but the plenary
  4. Brexit delay 'reasonable', as May tries cross-party talks
  5. MEPs allow Draghi's membership of secretive bank group
  6. EU parliament backs Morocco deal despite row
  7. Barnier open to 'future relations' talks if UK red lines shift
  8. German spies to monitor far-right AfD party

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us