Friday

12th Apr 2024

EU commission calls Frontex its new 'Return Agency'

  • "In 2019 about half a million people had received return orders and only 142,000 were actually returned," said vice-president Margaritis Schinas. (Photo: European Union, 2021)

The EU's law enforcement agency Frontex will be taking a lead role on sending unwanted and rejected asylum seekers back home.

The plan is part of a larger European Commission strategy on voluntary returns presented on Tuesday (27 April).

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Get the EU news that really matters

Instant access to all articles — and 20 years of archives. 14-day free trial.

... or subscribe as a group

"Frontex will become the European Union's returns agency," said European Commission vice-president Margaritis Schinas.

"There will be no European policy for migration and asylum without a significant returns procedure," added Schinas.

The agency is set to hire a new executive director to take charge of the return operations.

But it also comes amid reports, since disputed by an internal probe, that it has been complicit in illegal pushbacks in Greece.

The Warsaw-based agency has been helping with returns for years, drawing criticism for rights defenders in controversial cases.

Next month, it will launch a pilot project to help deport more people and reintegrate them.

The project intends to pave the way for a fully operational 'return' agency by the middle of next year, according to the strategy.

The same strategy aims to make returns voluntary, which the commission says is both cheaper, easier, and quicker.

Of the half million people issued a return decision in 2019, around one-third left the European Union. Of those, another third were voluntary.

A new EU return coordinator will also be created to help boost the figures of those going home.

But member states are unlikely to expend their diplomatic ties with a country in order to return failed asylum seekers on the behalf of another EU state.

The commission had also in the past floated the idea of creating a European travel document, a so-called laissez-passer, as an incentive to cooperate, in a proposal roundly rejected by African states.

Now it is using the threat of revoking visa-free travel from countries that refused to take back their nationals.

EU home affairs commissioner Ylva Johansson is currently renegotiating several readmission agreements, which have since been linked to a revised Visa code.

And in March, ministers of foreign and internal affairs discussed to what extent other countries accepted the return of their nationals from the EU.

The talks centred around an internal document from the European Commission, measuring the cooperation of 39 countries.

It has since been leaked by London-based civil liberties charity, Statewatch.

Afghanistan is the first entry of the 104-page document, a country ravaged by war.

It notes almost 30,000 had been issued return decisions in 2019, of which only 8 percent had left.

"More importantly Afghanistan accepts to readmit its nationals with an EU travel document," it states.

The commission has in the past also described its new pact on migration and asylum as a three-storied house.

Returns are housed on the second floor, it says.

In practise, it means shuffling people through a border screening process within five days.

Those not deemed worthy of asylum would be sent home.

The commission argues a special independent monitor would be present to make sure rights are followed.

But key EU lawmakers have already cast doubt on it.

Among them are German socialist Birgit Sippel and Dutch Green Tineke Strik.

Sippel is the lead MEP on the commission's screening regulation.

The bill includes the commission's new independent monitoring mechanism.

But Sippel described it as a "fig leaf". And Strik said EU states already opposed it.

"It may indeed even be the case that we will face a deadlock in the end," said Strik, in comments made in March.

Deadlock looms on EU's new asylum pact

MEPs working on the new EU-wide asylum reforms have cast doubt on whether agreement will be reached with their co-legislating member state counterparts. A proposal to create independent monitors on human rights is also on shaky ground.

Rift widens on 'returns' deadline in EU migration pact

Negotiations on the European Commission's asylum and migration pact among EU states continues. But a rift is widening on the eight-month deadline for capitals to sponsor returns of failed asylum seekers.

Investigation

'Inhumane' Frontex forced returns going unreported

The independence of Frontex's monitoring system to make sure people are treated humanely when they are forcibly returned is in question. Efforts by some national authorities are underway to create a more credible parallel system based on transparency and scrutiny.

Netherlands against more rights for rejected asylum-seekers

A leaked Council document provides a partial overview of member state positions on a new EU strategy on voluntary returns and reintegration. The Dutch are concerned any new legal framework on voluntary returns could lead to greater rights.

Feature

Frontex 'mislabelling minors as adults' on Greek islands

Lawyers in Greece accuse Frontex of incorrectly labeling minors as 'adults', a violation. Among them was 17-year old William, sent to the adult section of Moria, where he says he was abused. He was later able to prove his age.

EU 'ready' to support Cyprus on Lebanon migration

The EU is ready to offer extra support to Cyprus as the Mediterranean island faces a sharp increase in refugees arriving from Lebanon, a spokesperson for the EU executive told reporters on Thursday (4 April).

Latest News

  1. UK-EU deal on Gibraltar only 'weeks away'
  2. Belgium declares war on MEPs who took Russian 'cash'
  3. Brussels Dispatches: Foreign interference in the spotlight
  4. Calling time on Amazon's monopolism and exploitation
  5. Resist backlash on deforestation law, green groups tell EU
  6. China's high-quality development brings opportunities to the world
  7. Ukraine tops aid list again, but EU spending slumps
  8. Who did Russia pay? MEPs urge spies to give names

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersJoin the Nordic Food Systems Takeover at COP28
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersHow women and men are affected differently by climate policy
  3. Nordic Council of MinistersArtist Jessie Kleemann at Nordic pavilion during UN climate summit COP28
  4. Nordic Council of MinistersCOP28: Gathering Nordic and global experts to put food and health on the agenda
  5. Friedrich Naumann FoundationPoems of Liberty – Call for Submission “Human Rights in Inhume War”: 250€ honorary fee for selected poems
  6. World BankWorld Bank report: How to create a future where the rewards of technology benefit all levels of society?

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Georgia Ministry of Foreign AffairsThis autumn Europalia arts festival is all about GEORGIA!
  2. UNOPSFostering health system resilience in fragile and conflict-affected countries
  3. European Citizen's InitiativeThe European Commission launches the ‘ImagineEU’ competition for secondary school students in the EU.
  4. Nordic Council of MinistersThe Nordic Region is stepping up its efforts to reduce food waste
  5. UNOPSUNOPS begins works under EU-funded project to repair schools in Ukraine
  6. Georgia Ministry of Foreign AffairsGeorgia effectively prevents sanctions evasion against Russia – confirm EU, UK, USA

Join EUobserver

EU news that matters

Join us