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"Medicine can be often used as a tool of control," said Gianfranco Schiavone, president of Consorzio Italiano di Solidarietà, an association that offers assistance to refugees and is based in Trieste (Photo: Linda Caglioni, Lucrezia Lozza, Lavinia Nocelli)

Investigation

How migrants risk becoming drug addicts along Balkan route

Hassan turns a blister pack of tranquilisers over in his fingers. It contains tablets of Xanax, one of the few objects he still has after his stay in one of the many refugee camps scattered around the Greek islands and the mainland.\n \nHe obtained tranquilisers even though he neither asked for them nor knew what effect they had. His experience is similar to that of many other migrants who have crossed the Balkan route — one of the main paths into Europe. The widespread and uncontrolled distr...

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Author Bio

Linda Caglioni spent years reporting from the Balkans and on migration. Lucrezia Lozza is a freelancer who previously worked as a video journalist for Reuters. Lavinia Nocelli is a photojournalist with experience in refugee camps

"Medicine can be often used as a tool of control," said Gianfranco Schiavone, president of Consorzio Italiano di Solidarietà, an association that offers assistance to refugees and is based in Trieste (Photo: Linda Caglioni, Lucrezia Lozza, Lavinia Nocelli)

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Author Bio

Linda Caglioni spent years reporting from the Balkans and on migration. Lucrezia Lozza is a freelancer who previously worked as a video journalist for Reuters. Lavinia Nocelli is a photojournalist with experience in refugee camps

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