Friday

25th May 2018

Euroscepticism in decline, poll indicates

  • More than 50 percent of Europeans support election of the EU Commission President (Photo: ec.europa.eu)

Euroscepticism is receding amongst Europeans who also want EU lawmakers to promote job creation and welfare schemes ahead of debt reduction,according to a poll published Thursday (6 September).

According the eurobarometer poll, 40 percent reported a positive image of the EU, up 9 percent from the previous poll in November. Eurosceptic sentiment across the 27-country bloc has fallen from 26 percent to 23 percent. Meanwhile, 50 percent regard their country's EU membership as a positive thing compared to 31 percent of naysayers.

Dear EUobserver reader

Subscribe now for unrestricted access to EUobserver.

Sign up for 30 days' free trial, no obligation. Full subscription only 15 € / month or 150 € / year.

  1. Unlimited access on desktop and mobile
  2. All premium articles, analysis, commentary and investigations
  3. EUobserver archives

EUobserver is the only independent news media covering EU affairs in Brussels and all 28 member states.

♡ We value your support.

If you already have an account click here to login.

Britons remain the most eurosceptic with 36 percent having a negative view of the EU compared to 22 percent viewing it in a positive light. However, the negative figure is down from 49 percent in November 2011.

The poll also suggests that citizens want governments and the EU to prioritise job creation programmes over austerity driven efforts to cut public debt, with 72 percent of respondents putting employment and welfare programmes ahead of 37 percent calling for attention to focus on fiscal consolidation.

When asked about policies they would like to see pursued at EU level 44 percent of interviewees said that a more harmonised social welfare system would “strengthen (their) feeling of being a European citizen”.

MEPs and pro-EU campaigners will also welcome the results indicating that the parliament is the most identified of the EU institutions, with 53 percent identifying the parliament against 27 percent and 25 percent for the commission and European Central Bank. Only one in ten could identify the European Council as an EU institution.

In addition, 71 percent of respondents agreed that the Parliament played an “important” role in the running of the EU.

There were also signs that voters have a grasp of the co-decision process of adopting EU legislation, with three in five agreeing with statements that the EU budget and European laws have to be agreed jointly by the European Parliament and the member states.

The detailed survey, “Two years to go to the European elections” was commissioned by the European Parliament and carried out through face-to-face interviews in June.

Barroso blames capitals for plunge in EU popularity

Faced with a plunging popularity of the EU institutions, European Commission chief Jose Manuel Barroso has blamed national capitals for not defending the European project during the economic crisis.

Stakeholder

Green stadiums at the 2018 FIFA World Cup

By the time the tournament kicks off on 14 June, all twelve stadiums will all have undergone a standards certification process for sustainable buildings.

Visegrad Four 'nothing to hide' on rule of law issue

Central European countries say they have "nothing to hide" on rule of law issues - while justice commissioner Vera Jourova said they should agree to the Commission's controversial budget plans on rule of law conditionality.

Analysis

GDPR does not (yet) give right to global oblivion

The 'right to be forgotten' will become enshrined in EU law on Friday, but it is not yet clear to what extent it will apply. Will the EU's law determine how the internet looks globally?

Analysis

GDPR does not (yet) give right to global oblivion

The 'right to be forgotten' will become enshrined in EU law on Friday, but it is not yet clear to what extent it will apply. Will the EU's law determine how the internet looks globally?

News in Brief

  1. Close race as polls open in Irish abortion referendum
  2. Gazprom accepts EU conditions on gas supplies
  3. Facebook tells MEPs: non-users are not profiled
  4. Commission proposes ending France deficit procedure
  5. UK households hit with Brexit income loss
  6. Report: EU faces 10% cut in steel exports to US
  7. Australia wants more access to EU agricultural market
  8. CV of Italian PM candidate under scrutiny

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersOECD Report: Gender Equality Boosts GDP Growth in Nordic Region
  2. Centre Maurits Coppieters“Peace and reconciliation is a process that takes decades” Dr. Anthony Soares on #Brexit and Northern Ireland
  3. Mission of China to the EUMEPs Positive on China’s New Measures of Opening Up
  4. Macedonian Human Rights MovementOld White Men are Destroying Macedonia by Romanticizing Greece
  5. Counter BalanceControversial EIB-Backed Project Under Fire at European Parliament
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersIncome Inequality Increasing in Nordic Countries
  7. European Jewish CongressEU Leaders to Cease Contact with Mahmoud Abbas Until He Apologizes for Antisemitic Comments
  8. International Partnership for Human RightsAnnual Report celebrates organization’s tenth anniversary
  9. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Cooperation Needed on Green Exports and Funding
  10. Mission of China to the EUPremier Li Confirms China Will Continue to Open Up
  11. European Jewish CongressCalls on Brussels University to Revoke Decision to Honour Ken Loach
  12. Sustainable Energy Week 2018"Lead the Clean Energy Transition"- Register and Join Us in Brussels from 5 to 7 May

Latest News

  1. Green stadiums at the 2018 FIFA World Cup
  2. Visegrad Four 'nothing to hide' on rule of law issue
  3. GDPR does not (yet) give right to global oblivion
  4. Privacy Shield less relevant given GDPR, says data chief
  5. Unknown academic to lead Italy into EU clash
  6. 'Killer robot' projects eligible for EU defence fund
  7. Funding for European values needs radical changes
  8. Feeble EU format deflates Zuckerberg 'hearing'