Tuesday

16th Jan 2018

Air tragedy poses questions on EU safety rules

The crash of a Germanwings Airbus in the French Alps on Tuesday (24 March) is raising questions about EU aviation safety rules.

The main issue is requirements on the number of crew in the cockpit during flights.

Thank you for reading EUobserver!

Subscribe now for a 30 day free trial.

  1. €150 per year
  2. or €15 per month
  3. Cancel anytime

EUobserver is an independent, not-for-profit news organization that publishes daily news reports, analysis, and investigations from Brussels and the EU member states. We are an indispensable news source for anyone who wants to know what is going on in the EU.

We are mainly funded by advertising and subscription revenues. As advertising revenues are falling fast, we depend on subscription revenues to support our journalism.

For group, corporate or student subscriptions, please contact us. See also our full Terms of Use.

If you already have an account click here to login.

  • Planes cockpit doors are locked and only the pilot can let people in (Photo: Airbus)

Initial conclusions after examination of the plane’s black box indicate the co-pilot deliberately locked himself in the cockpit after the flight captain left, then initiated the plane's descent until it hit a mountain.

The plane, flying from Barcelona in Spain to Duesseldorf in Germany, crashed in the southern French Alps killing all 150 people on board.

"[The co-pilot] activated the button for a reason we completely ignore but which can be analysed as a will to destroy that plane," French local prosecutor Brice Robin told a press conference on Thursday (26 March).

The cockpit voice-recorder also indicates that someone, probably the captain, tried to open the cockpit door and even punched it.

Cockpit doors are locked on almost all planes since the 11 September 2001 terrorist attacks in the US, when four planes were hijacked.


Doors are equipped with an unlocking system involving codes and cameras. An emergency opening system also exists in case the remaining crew in the cockpit becomes unresponsive. 

In the case of the Germanwings flight, the co-pilot, apparently, refused to unlock the door when asked by his colleague to open it.

Dominique Fouda, a spokesman for the European Aviation Safety Agency in Cologne, was quoted by the New York Times as saying that there’s no regulatory requirement in Europe for a cabin crew member to be present in the cockpit when one of the pilots leaves.

She said the current arrangements exist for "physiological reasons".

Not all aviation safety authorities have issued specific regulations over the number of people in the cockpit after safety doors were imposed on planes.

But in the US, there is a rule that a flight attendant must go into the cockpit when one of the pilot leaves goes to use the bathroom.

This is rarely the case in Europe. Lufthansa, of which Germanwings is a subsidiary, doesn’t do it.

A few hours after revelations that the lone Germanwings co-pilot may have deliberately crashed the plane, a budget company, Norwegian Airlines, announced it would now require two people in the cockpit at all times.

Lufthansa’s boss, Carsten Spohr, refused on Thursday to follow suit.

"The captain did nothing wrong in leaving the cockpit. Flight attendants don’t have to go in the cockpit. There is no reason to change our guidelines," he said at a press conference.

The European Commission also refused to rush through changes to the current regulations.

"At this point it is important not to speculate," a commission spokesman told Euobserver.

"The European Aviation Safety Agency sent two experts to the crash site. The French authorities are leading the investigation. We need to wait and have a clear picture of the situation”.

EU leaders express shock after plane crash

European leaders have offered condolences to families of the 150 people who died on Tuesday following the crash of a Germanwings flight in the French Alps.

Germany eyes obligatory ID for Schengen flights

German interior minister Thomas de Maiziere has said the fact the air passengers in the EU's borderless region only need to present a ticket to board a plane is a "huge security problem".

MEPs target exports of cyber surveillance tech

MEPs have introduced a human rights clause into the export of cyber surveillance technology as part of EU-wide reforms to prevent abuse by autocratic regimes. The Strasbourg plenary will vote on the bill on Wednesday.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. ILGA EuropeFreedom of Movement and Same-Sex Couples in Romania – Case Update!
  2. EU2017EEEstonia Completes First EU Presidency, Introduced New Topics to the Agenda
  3. Bio-Based IndustriesLeading the Transition Towards a Post-Petroleum Society
  4. ACCAWelcomes the Start of the New Bulgarian Presidency
  5. Mission of China to the EUPremier Li and President Tusk Stress Importance of Ties at ASEM Summit
  6. EU2017EEVAT on Electronic Commerce: New Rules Adopted
  7. European Jewish CongressChair of EU Parliament Working Group on Antisemitism Condemns Wave of Attacks
  8. Counter BalanceA New Study Challenges the Infrastructure Mega Corridors Agenda
  9. Dialogue PlatformThe Gülen Community: Who to Believe - Politicians or Actions?" by Thomas Michel
  10. Plastics Recyclers Europe65% Plastics Recycling Rate Attainable by 2025 New Study Shows
  11. European Heart NetworkCommissioner Andriukaitis' Address to EHN on the Occasion of Its 25th Anniversary
  12. ACCACFOs Risk Losing Relevance If They Do Not Embrace Technology

Latest News

  1. Post-Brexit trade roll-over not automatic, EU paper says
  2. Oettinger pushes plastic tax but colleagues express doubts
  3. MEPs target exports of cyber surveillance tech
  4. Kosovo killing halts EU talks in Brussels
  5. ECB withheld information on 'flawed' bank supervision
  6. Fewer MEPs than visitors turn up for Estonian PM
  7. EU names China and Russia as top hackers
  8. Ten Commandments to overcome the EU's many crises