Monday

27th Jun 2022

Bornholm: No thanks to EU support

"It is a proper notion that we in the Western part of Europe should pay for getting the poor countries in Eastern Europe into the EU," says regional mayor Knud Andersen from the Danish island of Bornholm in the Baltic.

He supports wholehearted a proposal from the Liberal Party (Venstre) to abolish Common Agriculture Policy (CAP) support and reduce the support from the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF). The support is remarkable, as Bornholm and its 43.000 inhabitants have profited more from EU support than any other region in Denmark.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Become an expert on Europe

Get instant access to all articles — and 20 years of archives. 14-day free trial.

... or subscribe as a group

The Funds should be only for emergencies, says Andersen according to Danish daily Jyllands-Posten. Bornholm received 173 million kroner (more than 22 million euro) from 1994 to 1999, and this money has contributed to keep 678 people in job in an island that has for many years been a place which young people just left never to return.

But the money from the EU has not made the people of Bornholm love the EU. They are more EU sceptical than people from any other part of Denmark. Particularly the fishermen and the farmers are hostile, according to Knud Andersen, who says:

"The fishermen have had their quotas curtailed by the EU, and farmers experience a paper hysteria without equal."

Anders Hedetoft from Bornholm's Bureau of Agricultural Economics says that Bornholm will be able to do without the ERDF money, but that the island will need more time before it can do without the CAP support. He stresses the fact that people in Bornholm, like people on the West Coast of Jutland, have a very strong desire to make their own decisions.

"Everything that tastes of bureaucracy and remote control is unpopular," he says according to Jyllands-Posten.

Opinion

How to enhance EU cybersecurity

The Hungarian hacking allowed Russian intelligence to read 'over the shoulder' of an EU member state for an extended period of time. The difficulty for the EU is that it's not one nation, but a combination of 27 cybersecurity policies.

Opinion

Competing options for EU enlargement

We now have French president Emmanuel Macron's "European Political Community", European Council president Charles Michel's "European Geopolitical Community", and former Italian PM Enrico Letta's "European Confederation" — among others.

News in Brief

  1. Possible terror attack halts gay pride in Norway
  2. Belgian PM: Gas shortage requires joint response
  3. Bulgarian MPs set conditions for lifting enlargement veto
  4. Latvia: We need a brigade-size Nato force to 'feel safe'
  5. Deal reached on controversial energy treaty reform
  6. EU carbon emissions from energy up 6% in 2021
  7. Germany step closer to gas rationing
  8. Albania: EU 'disgrace' at lack of enlargement progress

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersEmerging journalists from the Nordics and Canada report the facts of the climate crisis
  2. Council of the EUEU: new rules on corporate sustainability reporting
  3. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic ministers for culture: Protect Ukraine’s cultural heritage!
  4. Reuters InstituteDigital News Report 2022
  5. EFBWW – EFBH – FETBBHow price increases affect construction workers
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersNew Nordic think tank examines influence of tech giants

Latest News

  1. EU summit's uncertainty in the face of economic war
  2. Next winter's gas looms large at EU summer summit
  3. Ukraine becomes EU candidate after 120 days of war
  4. How to enhance EU cybersecurity
  5. Competing options for EU enlargement
  6. MEPs demand to exit 'ecocide treaty' after reforms 'fail'
  7. Finland optimistic in Turkey talks over Nato
  8. Hungary's global-tax veto seen as 'blackmail'

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us