Friday

1st Jul 2022

EU unveils common charger plan - forcing Apple redesign

  • The new proposal could help consumers save €250m a year (Photo: Aaron Hockley)
Listen to article

The European Commission announced on Thursday (23 September) its long-awaited plans to make USB-C the standard charging port for all smartphones, tablets, and other small electronic devices - forcing Apple to redesign one of its best-selling products, the iPhone.

More than a decade ago, when there were more than 30 different types of chargers in the market, the EU urged phone manufacturers to agree on a common standard for smartphone chargers. Most of them did, but not all.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Become an expert on Europe

Get instant access to all articles — and 20 years of archives. 14-day free trial.

... or subscribe as a group

  • Smartphones, tablets, cameras, headphones, portable speakers and handheld video game consoles will be forced to have USB-C ports (Photo: Maurizio Pesce)

Today there are still three charger types - USB 2.0 Micro B, USB-C and Apple's Lightning.

"European consumers were frustrated long enough about incompatible chargers piling up in their drawers," said the EU commissioner in charge of digital policy, Margrethe Vestager.

But manufacturers of smartphones, tablets, cameras, headphones, portable speakers and handheld video game consoles sold in the EU will now be forced to have USB-C charging ports. They will also have to make their fast-charging interoperable.

The aim is to reduce the environmental footprint associated with their production, enabling consumers to reuse chargers when buying a new device.

Under the commission proposal, consumers will also be able to purchase a new electronic device without a new charger.

Electronic chargers have been estimated to produce more than 51,000 metric tons of 'e-waste' per year in the EU, where the total such waste generated in 2016 was 12.3 million metric tonnes - an equivalent to 16.6 kg on average per inhabitant.

According to the commission, the new proposal could help consumers save €250m a year, reducing e-waste by almost a thousand tonnes yearly.

"This is an important win for our consumers and environment," said Vestager.

Other products like e-readers or smart-watches were not considered, for technical reasons linked to their size or use conditions. Wireless chargers have also been left out of the scope of the reevaluation.

Biting Apple?

The proposal will potentially have the biggest impact on Apple - because the company has been trying to keep its own port connector since it launched the first iPhone back in 2007.

"We remain concerned that strict regulation mandating just one type of connector stifles innovation rather than encouraging it, which in turn will harm consumers in Europe and around the world," the company responded in a statement.

However, some Apple devices currently have USB C, such as the iPad Pro or MacBook Air. The tech giant previously argued that such legislation would in the short-term create "an unprecedented volume of electronic waste".

The EU commissioner for the internal market, Thierry Breton, stressed the proposal is not aimed at any one operator - arguing that companies could choose to redesign their devices to have an additional port beside the USB C.

"If Apple wants to continue to have their own plug, they will have the ability to do it. It's not against innovation, it's just to make the lives of our fellow citizens a little bit easier," Breton told reporters at a press briefing.

According to an EU Commission study, half of the chargers sold in the EU in 2018 had a USB micro-B port, while 29 percent had a USB C connector and 21 percent a Lightning connector.

Although a consumer, on average, owns around three mobile phone chargers, 38 percent of people report being unable to charge their mobile phone at least once because the chargers available were incompatible.

USB-C chargers are expected to become mandatory in 2024 or even later.

Both MEPs and member states will have to green-light the proposal.

MEPs urge binding rules for common chargers by July

MEPs demanded the European Commission ensure immediate EU regulatory action on common chargers for all mobile devices by July, enabling users to easily re-use old devices and reducing e-waste.

Investigation

MEPs slam Commission over common charger delay

Citing an EUobserver investigation, MEPs on the consumer protection committee have slammed the EU Commission for allowing Apple to get away with refusing to comply with a common smartphone charger for over a decade.

Investigation

How Apple lobbied EU to delay common smartphone charger

iPhones and Android products don't use the same charger. This is annoying for consumers and harmful for the environment. Old chargers produce more than 51,000 tons of electronic waste per year.

Industry agrees on standardised EU phone charger

Searching for a phone charger that works with your phone will soon be a thing of the past, as the world's ten major mobile phone manufacturers have agreed to produce a harmonised charger for users across Europe, with the first such chargers expected to be introduced on the EU market next year. The industry's agreement, pushed by the European Commission, is not legally binding, however.

Opinion

Nato's Madrid summit — key takeaways

For the most part Nato and its 30 leaders rose to the occasion — but it wasn't without room for improvement. The lesson remains that Nato still doesn't know how or want to hold allies accountable for disruptive behaviour.

Opinion

Nato's Madrid summit — key takeaways

For the most part Nato and its 30 leaders rose to the occasion — but it wasn't without room for improvement. The lesson remains that Nato still doesn't know how or want to hold allies accountable for disruptive behaviour.

MEPs boycott awards over controversial sponsorship

Two MEPs have withdrawn their nominations from the MEPs Awards over the Swiss pharmaceutical company Novartis's participation as a sponsor — currently involved in an alleged bribery scandal in Greece.

News in Brief

  1. EU Parliament 'photographs protesting interpreters'
  2. Poland still failing to meet EU judicial criteria
  3. Report: Polish president fishing for UN job
  4. Auditors raise alarm on EU Commission use of consultants
  5. Kaliningrad talks needed with Russia, says Polish PM
  6. Report: EU to curb state-backed foreign takeovers
  7. EU announces trade deal with New Zealand
  8. Russia threatens Norway over goods transit

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic and Canadian ministers join forces to combat harmful content online
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic ministers write to EU about new food labelling
  3. Nordic Council of MinistersEmerging journalists from the Nordics and Canada report the facts of the climate crisis
  4. Council of the EUEU: new rules on corporate sustainability reporting
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic ministers for culture: Protect Ukraine’s cultural heritage!
  6. Reuters InstituteDigital News Report 2022

Latest News

  1. Nato's Madrid summit — key takeaways
  2. Czech presidency to fortify EU embrace of Ukraine
  3. Covid-profiting super rich should fight hunger, says UN food chief
  4. EU pollution and cancer — it doesn't have to be this way
  5. Israel smeared Palestinian activists, EU admits
  6. MEPs boycott awards over controversial sponsorship
  7. If Russia collapses — which states will break away?
  8. EU Parliament interpreters stage strike

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us