Saturday

25th May 2019

Germany in u-turn on EU swastika ban

Germany has made a u-turn on its plan to criminalise Nazi insignia – such as the swastika – across the European Union, and will leave it up to the 27 member states whether or not to punish people who deny the Holocaust.

The move comes after European Hindu groups this month joined forces to fight the German plan saying that the swastika had been one of their religious symbols for around 5,000 years before Adolf Hitler's Nazi party adopted it in the 1930s.

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Last week, the Italian government published a draft law which proposes penalties of up to three years in jail for inciting racial hatred, but which stopped short of making Holocaust denial a crime.

The German Justice minister Brigitte Zypries said earlier this month that Germany – which currently holds the six-month EU presidency - wanted to harmonise rules throughout the bloc for dealing with Holocaust deniers and for punishing displays of Nazi symbols, banned in Germany and eight other EU states.

But in an emailed statement, the German EU presidency said it would "not seek to prohibit specific symbols such as swastikas" when setting out plans for an EU-wide anti-racism law.

It would also not try to push all EU states to say it is a crime to deny that 6 million Jews were exterminated during the Second World War, guaranteeing "the member states the necessary leeway for maintaining their established constitutional traditions."

"The goal is to attain minimum harmonisation of provisions on criminal liability for disseminating racist and xenophobic statements," the German EU presidency said in the statement.

The European Commission proposed in 2001 an EU-wide anti-racism law, but EU states failed to agree, struggling over the issue of freedom of expression.

Two years ago, a Luxembourg presidency attempt to push through legislation to unify legal standards for Holocaust denial, was frozen after Denmark, Italy and the UK voiced concerns that it would violate civil liberties.

Germany is now considering reviving the Luxembourg idea which suggests that incitement to racism and xenophobia should be punishable by at least one to three years in jail in all 27 EU states, but leaves it to each state to decide on the specifics.

The Luxembourg blueprint, which Germany is studying, says that racist declarations or Holocaust denial would not be prosecuted if they were expressed in a way that did not incite hatred against an individual or group of people, according to the DPA news agency.

German call for EU initiative against right-wing extremism

German justice minister Brigitte Zypries has called for a Europe-wide initiative to tackle right-wing extremism to be put in place and plans to push ahead with the idea using her country's current presidency of the EU.

Hindus oppose German plan for EU swastika ban

Hindus across Europe are joining forces to stop a German-led move to put an EU-wide ban on the Swastika – a 5,000 year-old religious Hindu sign but now more known for being the symbol of the Nazis.

German Holocaust ban idea meeting resistance

EU justice commissioner Franco Frattini has spoken in favour of a German proposal to criminalise denial of the Holocaust across the 27-member bloc - but the fiercest resistance against such a move comes from Frattini's own country, Italy.

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