Wednesday

8th Feb 2023

Genetically modified foods back in EU?

In the beginning of June, the EU Commission will advance a proposal that will radically change the Union's practice on the issue of genetically modified foods, writes Danish daily Information. The proposal will entail that it will be possible to import foods with residues of genetically modified products that are otherwise not allowed in the EU.

According to Information, the proposal originates with EU Commissioner for Consumers' Affairs, David Byrne. A visit to the USA should have left Mr Byrne with an impression of deep dissatisfaction with the EU rules on this issue among American politicians and business leaders.

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"It looks as if the Commission is going to help the Americans undermine our own rules on this issue," says Danish MP Keld Albrechtsen (Enhedslisten, Left Coalition) to Information. Mr Albrechtsen refers to the moratorium, forbidding the cultivation of genetically modified plants and the import of products containing residues of genetically modified plants. This moratorium has been adopted by a number of EU countries while it is respected by the rest of the EU member states.

"If the Americans succeed in pressurising the Commission into accepting this proposal, the moratorium will be undermined. Then, in a few years' time, the Americans will be able to demand that the moratorium be abolished and replaced by a reciprocal agreement on approval in the area of genetically modified products," says Keld Albrechtsen.

He is seconded by Jørgen Jespersen, MP, spokesman on alimentary matters for SF (Socialist People's Party), who says that Denmark may be forced to activate her so-called Environment Guarantee.

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