Thursday

25th Feb 2021

EU to fund pan-European radio station

Radio fans will from next year onwards be able to tune in to a new pan-European station, to be set up by a multinational group of broadcasters and funded by the European Commission.

The 'European Radio Project' (ERP) - a consortium of 16 radio stations from 13 member states - will from April 2008 onwards bring programmes "from a European point of view," according to plans seen by EUobserver.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Become an expert on Europe

Get instant access to all articles — and 20 years of archives. 14-day free trial.

... or subscribe as a group

  • The commission says the new station will enjoy "full editorial independence" (Photo: Wikipedia)

The project, to be officially signed off this Friday (14 December), will see the ERP group jointly producing daily half-an-hour EU "hard news" shows, weekly magazines and coverage of big European cultural events.

The programmes will be broadcast on the usual frequencies of the participating radio stations, as well as through a new ERP internet site, which will be in the air from June onwards.

Participants include internationally operating public broadcasters such as Germany's Deutsche Welle, Radio France Internationale and Radio Netherlands Worldwide, as well as Poland's Polskie Radio and Spain's Radio Punto.

Belgian, Czech, Bulgarian, Greek, Hungarian, Portuguese, Romanian, and Slovenian channels are also taking part in the scheme, which is open to further participants in future.

Original content for the radio shows will initially be produced in five "core" languages - English, French, German, Spanish and Polish - and will be translated into Bulgarian, Greek, Hungarian, Portuguese and Romanian.

More core languages and translated versions will be added in the coming years so that by 2012, all official 23 EU languages should be covered.

The euro-radio project will be primarily financed by the EU Commission, which earlier this year issued a tender for "informative radio programmes on EU affairs" made by radio operators belonging to various member states.

The ERP consortium won the tender and will now pocket €5.8 million per year of subsidies for its pan-European shows, which comes down to a daily amount of € 15.890, commission sources said.

The 16 participating channels themselves will also support the ERP by providing frequencies, studio space and personnel.

Sources familiar with the project said the commission as a major financer "will not interfere in any way in the content" of ERP programming, with a commission official confirming that "they will have full editorial independence."

The commission tender cites as aim of the radio project to "encourage the development of a European public area," with Brussels already subsidising the European TV news channel EuroNews to the tune of €5 million euro a year (increasing to € 10 million from next year onwards).

ERP programmes are likely to include "Europe in brief" (European news of the day); "Europe in perspective" (backgrounds with the news); "Europe in-depth" (interview, analysis, and debates) and "Europe Live" (major cultural events in the EU).

Deutsche Welle will ensure the editorial coordination of the project, while Radio France will be responsible for financial affairs and Radio Netherlands will run the web portal of the euro-station.

The audience is estimated at 12 to 19 million daily listeners in the EU-27 plus around 30 million in the rest of the world. The consortium hopes to increase its EU audience to 30 million through marketing.

Green Deal

EU sets out plan to mitigate 'unavoidable' climate events

Extreme climate-related events cost the EU's economy €12bn annually. Brussels aims to reduce the so-called climate protection gap - the difference between insurance protection and total losses - which is widening due to more frequent extreme weather events.

Opinion

Questions for Germany on EU's Russia strategy

Suspension or cancellation of Nord Stream 2 does not call for a drawn-out search for unanimity by the EU's foreign ministers, nor complex ratification procedures in the European Parliament or member states' parliaments, write three former EU prime ministers.

News in Brief

  1. Armenian prime minister denounces 'coup' attempt
  2. UK warns EU against escalating City-of-London battle
  3. Brussels mulls extending data-roaming regime for 10 years
  4. Full list of European firms US forced to ditch Russia pipeline
  5. French diplomat calls Johnson 'inveterate liar'
  6. French town's switch to vegetarian meals prompts backlash
  7. Police seize 23 tonnes of cocaine in Europe's biggest haul
  8. WHO Covax programme delivers first vaccines to Ghana

Opinion

Questions for Germany on EU's Russia strategy

Suspension or cancellation of Nord Stream 2 does not call for a drawn-out search for unanimity by the EU's foreign ministers, nor complex ratification procedures in the European Parliament or member states' parliaments, write three former EU prime ministers.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Council to host EU webinars on energy, digitalisation and antibiotic resistance
  2. UNESDAEU Code of Conduct can showcase PPPs delivering healthier more sustainable society
  3. CESIKlaus Heeger and Romain Wolff re-elected Secretary General and President of independent trade unions in Europe (CESI)
  4. Nordic Council of MinistersWomen benefit in the digitalised labour market
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersReport: The prevalence of men who use internet forums characterised by misogyny
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersJoin the Nordic climate debate on 17 November!

Latest News

  1. Who are the EU's new Russian deplorables?
  2. Afghan asylum family beaten in Greece, set adrift at sea
  3. EU leaders face Covid-mutations dilemma at summit
  4. EU sets out plan to mitigate 'unavoidable' climate events
  5. Questions for Germany on EU's Russia strategy
  6. Greenland's snap election exposes global mineral demand
  7. Covid-19 certificates back on EU leaders' agenda
  8. Ethiopia war creating new 'refugee crisis', EU envoy warns

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us