Wednesday

26th Jun 2019

Opinion

Europe needs hope

  • On both national and European level, left-wing parties should return to their original causes (Photo: morberg)

The victory of Syriza in Greece is important not only for Greek people, but also the rest of Europe. With the crisis and the rise of far-right all over Europe, a left alternative is urgent.

One of my best friends is Greek. We met during his Erasmus exchange programme in Brussels ten years ago. We had many discussions, but never on politics. It did not make sense, all the politicians were the same, argued my Greek friend. He had no interest or hope in politics.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Support quality EU news

Get instant access to all articles — and 18 year's of archives. 30 days free trial.

... or join as a group

  • Figures from all over Europe clearly show that austerity has failed to achieve its goal (Photo: consilium.europa.eu)

During the first years of the crisis I went to visit him in Athens. He was living in Exarchia, a neighborhood that is home to many anarchists and radical leftists. None of it had an impact on him. He was working for a company and doing his thing, “enjoying life” as he often said.

As the crisis got worse he had to move to an island if he wanted to keep his job. He was working full time but because of the austerity measures his wage was cut to €500. The crisis was not only affecting him but also his friends and family. The last time I met him in Greece, he seemed worried for his future and was looking for ways to leave the country.

Then, suddenly in 2012 things changed.

My friend and I started to discuss politics and austerity. One of the reasons was the success of Syriza in 2012 elections. He became politicised and, even though Syriza did not win the elections, my friend now had hope and decided not to leave the country.

With the Syriza victory on 25 January, maybe he was right.

Crisis

Meanwhile, Greece is still in crisis. One third of the population lives in poverty. The average Greek became 40 percent poorer between 2008 and 2013. Cuts in the health system are higher than 40 perent. Suicide rates have grown by 60 percent. Youth unemployment is about 55 percent.

The damages caused by austerity policies are not limited to Greece. According to the most recent Eurostat figures, within the EU alone, 25 million Europeans are unemployed. Youth unemployment is at 23 percent and 125 million people are at risk of poverty.

Figures from all over Europe show that austerity has failed to achieve its goals. Europe is currently in crisis because of how mainstream political parties chose to tackle the crisis in the first place.

Furthermore, recent research conducted by Economist Intelligence Unit shows that we are also suffering from a crisis of democracy. Low voter turnout and sharp falls in the membership of mainstream parties are some of the clearest indicators.

Rise on the right

Not everybody suffered from the crisis.

Far-right and populist parties did great business. Golden Dawn, a Neo Nazi party, is the third largest party in Greece. The National Front won last year’s EU election in France getting 25 percent of the votes and polls show that its leader Marine Le Pen could win the presidential elections.

Ukip, an anti-EU anti-immigrant party, won the European elections in UK with ease. The rightist Dansk Folkeparti is on the rise in Denmark. The nationalist Finns Party is the third largest party in Finland.

These parties use migrants as a scapegoat for poverty and unemployment figures. The real problem is that mainstream parties have been parroting the same arguments with different words.

Meanwhile, research by the European Network Against Racism shows that racism and discrimination are on the rise in Europe.

Left alternative

What Europe needs today is a clear alternative from the left, which has been invisible so far.

The past 35 years of social democracy in Europe was based on fear. Fear of the right, fear of losing power. In every European country, it is possible to see how social democracy has shifted to the centre-right of the political spectrum. This is because they fail to set the political agenda and no longer believe in their principles.

On both a national and European level, left-wing parties should return to their roots. This means a stern rejection of all forms of crippling austerity but also the protection (instead of dismantlement) of the welfare state that the left worked so hard to build.

It is possible to set three principles for the left. Solidarity has always been and should remain a leftist principle. Solidarity among people, classes and nations.

A second principle is redistribution. If the left wants a project to tackle poverty and inequality, redistribution of wealth is the answer. The capital is there, but it is concentrated with an elite. According to recent figures by Oxfam, in 2016 the wealthiest 1 percent will possess as much as 99 percent of the world population.

Equality is the third principle. Equality is essential if left-wing parties want citizens to get involved in political decision-making. Equality should not remain a theoretical discourse, but must also take shape in equal rights and genuine equality of opportunity.

The left needs to do what Syriza did to my friend: politicise people and give them hope.

A social Europe which show solidarity, respects the diversity of people and invests in people would without doubt be a better Europe than the one we have today.

Bleri Lleshi is Brussels based political philosopher and author of various books. You can follow him on Facebook and Twitter.

Disclaimer

The views expressed in this opinion piece are the author's, not those of EUobserver.

Analysis

Syriza: Bearing the hopes of many non-Greeks too

Other political upstarts in the EU will be watching Syriza carefully. Any Syriza successes will become their potential successes. Any failures, their potential failures.

EU-Vietnam trade deal a bad day for workers' rights

Behind the smiles and handshakes, the signature of the EU-Vietnam trade and investment deals agreed on Tuesday and to be signed this week have dire consequences for human well-being and our ability to prevent climate and ecological breakdown.

Council of Europe vs Russia: stay or go?

We have reached the point where Russia threatens to leave the Council of Europe and cease to be party to the European Convention on Human Rights.

News in Brief

  1. EU warns Turkey as 'Gezi Park' trials begin
  2. EU universities to share students, curricula
  3. Migrant rescue ship loses Human Rights Court appeal
  4. Denmark completes social democrat sweep of Nordics
  5. Johnson offers 'do or die' pledge on Brexit
  6. Weber indirectly attacks Macron in newspaper op-ed
  7. EU to sign free trade deal with Vietnam
  8. EU funding of air traffic control 'largely unnecessary'

Six takeaways on digital disinformation at EU elections

For example, Germany's primetime TV news reported that 47 percent of political social media discussions were related to the extreme-right AfD party, when in fact this was the case only for Twitter - used by only four percent of Germans.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. International Partnership for Human RightsEU-Uzbekistan Human Rights Dialogue: EU to raise key fundamental rights issues
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersNo evidence that social media are harmful to young people
  3. Nordic Council of MinistersCanada to host the joint Nordic cultural initiative 2021
  4. Vote for the EU Sutainable Energy AwardsCast your vote for your favourite EUSEW Award finalist. You choose the winner of 2019 Citizen’s Award.
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersEducation gets refugees into work
  6. Counter BalanceSign the petition to help reform the EU’s Bank
  7. UNICEFChild rights organisations encourage candidates for EU elections to become Child Rights Champions
  8. UNESDAUNESDA Outlines 2019-2024 Aspirations: Sustainability, Responsibility, Competitiveness
  9. Counter BalanceRecord citizens’ input to EU bank’s consultation calls on EIB to abandon fossil fuels
  10. International Partnership for Human RightsAnnual EU-Turkmenistan Human Rights Dialogue takes place in Ashgabat
  11. Nordic Council of MinistersNew campaign: spot, capture and share Traces of North
  12. Nordic Council of MinistersLeading Nordic candidates go head-to-head in EU election debate

Latest News

  1. EU moves to end car-testing 'confidentiality clause'
  2. EU parliament gives extra time for leaders on top jobs
  3. Europe's rights watchdog lifts Russia sanctions
  4. EU-Vietnam trade deal a bad day for workers' rights
  5. EU 'special envoy' going to US plan for Palestine
  6. Polish judicial reforms broke EU law, court says
  7. EU study: no evidence of 'East vs West' food discrimination
  8. Russia tried to stir up Irish troubles, US think tank says

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersNew Secretary General: Nordic co-operation must benefit everybody
  2. Platform for Peace and JusticeMEP Kati Piri: “Our red line on Turkey has been crossed”
  3. UNICEF2018 deadliest year yet for children in Syria as war enters 9th year
  4. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic commitment to driving global gender equality
  5. International Partnership for Human RightsMeet your defender: Rasul Jafarov leading human rights defender from Azerbaijan
  6. UNICEFUNICEF Hosts MEPs in Jordan Ahead of Brussels Conference on the Future of Syria
  7. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic talks on parental leave at the UN
  8. International Partnership for Human RightsTrial of Chechen prisoner of conscience and human rights activist Oyub Titiev continues.
  9. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic food policy inspires India to be a sustainable superpower
  10. Nordic Council of MinistersMilestone for Nordic-Baltic e-ID
  11. Counter BalanceEU bank urged to free itself from fossil fuels and take climate leadership
  12. Intercultural Dialogue PlatformRoundtable: Muslim Heresy and the Politics of Human Rights, Dr. Matthew J. Nelson

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us