Wednesday

26th Jul 2017

Leaders unimpressed by May’s offer to EU citizens

EU state and government heads have warned that UK prime minister Theresa May’s initial offer on post-Brexit EU citizens’ rights is lacking in detail and fail to provide appropriate safeguards and certainty.

“My first impression is that the British offer is below expectations, and risks worsening the situation of citizens,” European Council president Donald Tusk said Friday (23 June), at the end of the two-day EU summit in Brussels.

“But it’s going to be for our negotiating team to analyse it line-by-line,” Tusk added.

Malta’s prime minister, Joseph Muscat, said that May’s offer is a “good start, but we need to see the details”.

He added that he is concerned about “pitfalls” that might be created if details are not ironed out. “For example, what about non-EU citizens who are related to EU citizens? Everyone would like a situation where there is a blanket fair treatment of citizens,” Muscat said.

The Brexit issue did not take up much time during the two-day EU summit.

The EU leaders emphasised that Brexit talks should be conducted between the EU’s chief negotiator, Michel Barnier, and the UK’s Brexit minister, David Davis, instead of at summits.

“The work of 27 member states should be given priority over Brexit negotiations,” German chancellor Angela Merkel said after the summit at a joint press conference with French president Emmanuel Macron.

Merkel called the British positions “a good start”. “But it was not a breakthrough.”

Macron said it is for Barnier to examine the offer.

The Irish premier, Leo Varadkar, called the British PM's proposal a “positive gesture”.

Echoing Muscat, Varadkar said leaders would like to see more details, for instance on what happens to family members of EU citizens who may wish to join them in the UK.

Earlier on Friday, Belgian prime minister Charles Michel called May’s proposals “particularly vague”. “We don’t want a cat in the bag,” he said, adding: “We want the rights of EU citizens to be permanently guaranteed.”

Dutch prime minister Mark Rutte said there were still “thousands of questions to ask”.

Reassurances

Theresa May laid out on Thursday to EU leaders the highlights of what she called a “fair and serious” offer for EU citizens living in the UK.

The plan would allow EU citizens already living in the UK to stay, and May insisted she does not want to break families apart.

A more detailed plan is due to be made public on Monday (26 June).

May’s offer was characterised as “pathetic” and “unacceptable” by a grassroots organisation, the3million, that represents EU citizens in the UK.

They would like to see a separate deal on their rights, so that even if there is no final Brexit deal, their rights would be “ring fenced”.

On Friday, May said she wanted to “reassure” those citizens, insisting: “No one will have to leave, we won’t be seeing families split apart.”

One of the outstanding questions is which public body will guarantee those rights after Brexit.

The EU wants the European Commission to monitor the implementation of those rights and have the European Court of Justice (ECJ) - the EU’s top court, which is despised by Brexiteers - to protect and enforce the rights.

European Commission chief Jean-Claude Juncker noted on Friday that he does not see the ECJ being excluded from the Brexit settlements, but it is for the negotiations to resolve.

In the meantime, George Osborne - the former UK finance minister and current editor of The Evening Standard newspaper - reported on Friday (23 June) that May, in the days following the referendum last year, was the only cabinet minister to block a unilateral offer to EU citizens, which would have ensured that they can remain in Britain.

David Cameron, the UK prime minister at that time, had prepared an offer to give EU citizens certainty after the Brexit referendum, but it was not supported by his home secretary, Theresa May.

Dutch liberal MEP Sophie In't Veld reacted to the report by tweeting: “Ruthless, heartless, calculating. Total disdain for human rights.”

UK agrees to EU conditions on Brexit talks

In their first meeting, the EU's Michel Barnier and Brexit minister David Davis agreed that talks on future relations will start only when "sufficient progress" has been made on divorce proceedings.

UK previews offer on EU nationals' rights

EU nationals in the UK could get almost the same rights as British people after Brexit, but an EU deal might not happen, the British government has said.

Column / Brexit Briefing

Taking back control at home, not from EU

A year after British voters chose to leave the EU, "taking back control" from the bloc is firmly on the back-burner, as May government’s main ambition is its immediate survival.

EU urges UK to clarify its Brexit positions

EU and UK negotiators presented their Brexit positions to identify common grounds this week, but that was made difficult by the scarcity of UK position papers.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. EU2017EELocal Leaders Push for Local and Regional Targets to Address Climate Change
  2. European Healthy Lifestyle AllianceMore Women Than Men Have Died From Heart Disease in Past 30 Years
  3. European Jewish CongressJean-Marie Le Pen Faces Trial for Oven Comments About Jewish Singer
  4. ACCAAnnounces Belt & Road Research at Shanghai Conference
  5. ECPAFood waste in the field can double without crop protection. #WithOrWithout #pesticides
  6. EU2017EEEstonia Allocates €1 Million to Alleviate Migratory Pressure From Libya in Italy
  7. Dialogue PlatformFethullah Gulen's Message on the Anniversary of the Coup Attempt in Turkey
  8. Martens CentreWeeding out Fake News: An Approach to Social Media Regulation
  9. European Jewish CongressEJC Concerned by Normalisation of Antisemitic Tropes in Hungary
  10. Counter BalanceOut for Summer Episode 1: How the EIB Sweeps a Development Fiasco Under the Rug
  11. CESICESI to Participate in Sectoral Social Dialogue Committee on Postal Services
  12. ILGA-EuropeMalta Keeps on Rocking: Marriage Equality on Its Way