Saturday

1st Oct 2022

EU mulls shoring up Rwanda armed forces in Mozambique

  • The EU is also spending €89m to support the Mozambican Armed Force (Photo: EUTM Mozambique)
Listen to article

The EU may end up spending millions to prop up Rwanda's defence force in Mozambique with non-lethal equipment.

An internal paper dated 3 May from its foreign policy branch, the EEAS, bases the idea on the so-called European Peace Facility.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Become an expert on Europe

Get instant access to all articles — and 20 years of archives. 14-day free trial.

... or subscribe as a group

The European Peace Facility allows EU authorities to tap into an off budget pot to shore up foreign militaries around the globe, including in Ukraine.

But it has also courted controversy given the often opaque nature of armed conflict in areas like Mozambique.

The Mozambique government has itself hired the services of private military contractors, like Russia's Wagner group and the Dyck Advisory Group to carry out specialised counter-insurgency operations.

At the same time, the EU last year launched a two-year mission in Mozambique to help shore up its armed forces.

This includes training the Mozambican Army Commando Forces and Navy Fusiliers to form a quick reaction force to be deployed in Cabo Delgado.

Described as a "concept note", the EU plan is to support Rwanda with €20m in non-lethal equipment in Mozambique's northern province of Cabo Delgado.

The gear includes deployable tents, vehicles, generators, air transportation for troop rotation and resupply as well as "personnel equipment".

The aim is to help Rwanda "extend, protect and sustain the territorial and tactical gains they have made so far," states the paper.

Rwanda is said to be fighting an infiltration of possible Islamic State affiliated insurgents in the province of Niassa, as well as in neighbouring countries like Tanzania and Malawi.

The conflict in the Cabo Delgado region has displaced around 800,000 people and triggered a humanitarian crisis for some 1.5 million.

News in Brief

  1. EU ministers adopt measures to tackle soaring energy bills
  2. EU takes Malta to court over golden passports
  3. EU to ban Russian products worth €7bn a year more
  4. Denmark: CIA did not warn of Nord Stream attack
  5. Drone sightings in the North Sea 'occurred over months'
  6. Gazprom threatens to cut gas deliveries to Europe via Ukraine
  7. New compromise over EU energy emergency measures
  8. 15 states push for EU-wide gas price cap

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. The European Association for Storage of EnergyRegister for the Energy Storage Global Conference, held in Brussels on 11-13 Oct.
  2. EFBWW – EFBH – FETBBA lot more needs to be done to better protect construction workers from asbestos
  3. European Committee of the RegionsThe 20th edition of EURegionsWeek is ready to take off. Save your spot in Brussels.
  4. UNESDA - Soft Drinks EuropeCall for EU action – SMEs in the beverage industry call for fairer access to recycled material
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic prime ministers: “We will deepen co-operation on defence”
  6. EFBWW – EFBH – FETBBConstruction workers can check wages and working conditions in 36 countries

Latest News

  1. Editor's weekly digest: A week of leaks
  2. Putin declares holy war on Western 'satanism'
  3. Two elections and 'Macron's club' in focus Next WEEK
  4. EU agrees windfall energy firm tax — but split on gas-price cap
  5. Ukrainian chess prodigy: 'We are not going to resign ... anywhere'
  6. Going Down Under — EU needs to finish trade deal with Australia
  7. MEPs worry Russian disinfo weakens support for Ukraine
  8. Everything you need to know about the EU gas price cap plan

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us