Monday

19th Aug 2019

ECB to tighten noose on Greek government

  • Athens: The ECB is to ban Greek banks from increasing their holdings of Greek government debt (Photo: and641)

The European Central Bank is set to make it illegal for Greek lenders to increase their purchases of short-term government bonds in a move that will tighten the funding noose on the Greek government.

The decision, which has reportedly been formalised in a letter sent on Tuesday (March 24) to Greek authorities, the Financial Times reports, comes just two days after the bank’s president Mario Draghi rejected suggestions that the bank was effectively blackmailing Greece by making it tougher for its cash-strapped government and banks to access ECB funding, during a European Parliament hearing on Monday.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Support quality EU news

Get instant access to all articles — and 18 year's of archives. 30 days free trial.

... or join as a group

“We are not creating rules for Greece .... we are simply using existing rules. Greek bonds are below the normal level of collateral,” said Draghi.

The rationale for the ban is that it will help break the link between the indebted Greek government and its fragile banking sector which currently hold around €11 billion of treasury bills issued by their government.

But the move starves Alexis Tsipras’ Syriza government of an important source of cash at a time when the country is believed to be within weeks of running out of money to pay its bills.

A loan repayment is due to the International Monetary Fund on 9 April, followed by two treasury-bill repayments of around €2 billion the following week.

Many have questioned the ECB’s decision in February to withdraw a waiver that allowed Greek banks to access its cheap loans using government bonds and government-guaranteed assets as collateral, after Tsipras’ left-wing government halted the implementation of Greece’s bailout programme, promising to renegotiate it.

Deposits have been flowing out of Greek banks since December. Savers removed more than €25 billion from Greek bank accounts in January and February dropping bank deposits to their lowest level since 2005, and are withdrawing funds at a rate of €1.5 billion per week. The capital flight has made banks increasingly reliant on the ECB’s emergency liquidity assistance programme.

Elsewhere, on Tuesday, former finance minister George Papaconstantinou was found guilty of removing relatives' names from a list of potential Greek tax evaders.

The list of over 2,000 Greek bank account holders in Swiss branches of HSBC was passed by Christine Lagarde, the chief executive of the International Monetary Fund who was then France’s finance minister, back in 2010, earning the sobriquet ‘the Lagarde list’.

However, despite causing outrage at a time when Greece was facing bankruptcy and chronic tax evasion by its wealthy, successive governments were accused of doing little to investigate the list of accounts, which were said by Papaconstantinou to be valued at €1.5 billion.

Papaconstantinou, who was expelled from the once dominant centre-left Pasok party in 2012, received a one-year suspended prison sentence and will escape jail.

Dijsselbloem: Greece might need capital controls

Greece could be forced to resort to Cypriot-style capital controls in a bid to prevent depositors taking their money out of the country, the chairman of the Eurogroup has warned.

Analysis

Greece's cash-flow crisis

The general view amongst commentators and analysts is that Greece needs an agreement with its creditors by mid-April to prevent a default.

Greek bank deposits hit decade low

Deposits held by Greek banks have fallen to their lowest level in a decade, according to statistics released on Friday by the European Central Bank.

EU ends silence on Hong Kong protests

The EU, in league with Canada, has spoken out on the Hong Kong protests after months of silence in what one expert called "a clear expression of support for the protesters".

Exclusive

Selmayr did not keep formal records of lobby meetings

The German former secretary-general of the European Commission held some 21 meetings which were registered in the lobby register. But no documents appeared to exist summarising what was said.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. UNESDAUNESDA reduces added sugars 11.9% between 2015-2017
  2. International Partnership for Human RightsEU-Uzbekistan Human Rights Dialogue: EU to raise key fundamental rights issues
  3. Nordic Council of MinistersNo evidence that social media are harmful to young people
  4. Nordic Council of MinistersCanada to host the joint Nordic cultural initiative 2021
  5. Vote for the EU Sutainable Energy AwardsCast your vote for your favourite EUSEW Award finalist. You choose the winner of 2019 Citizen’s Award.
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersEducation gets refugees into work
  7. Counter BalanceSign the petition to help reform the EU’s Bank
  8. UNICEFChild rights organisations encourage candidates for EU elections to become Child Rights Champions
  9. UNESDAUNESDA Outlines 2019-2024 Aspirations: Sustainability, Responsibility, Competitiveness
  10. Counter BalanceRecord citizens’ input to EU bank’s consultation calls on EIB to abandon fossil fuels
  11. International Partnership for Human RightsAnnual EU-Turkmenistan Human Rights Dialogue takes place in Ashgabat
  12. Nordic Council of MinistersNew campaign: spot, capture and share Traces of North

Latest News

  1. EU ends silence on Hong Kong protests
  2. Is Salvini closing just harbours or also the rule of law?
  3. No-deal Brexit would seriously harm UK, leaked paper says
  4. Selmayr did not keep formal records of lobby meetings
  5. EU asked to solve migrant rescue deadlock
  6. Internal EU paper: Second Brexit vote was no longer 'distant dream'
  7. EU has 'zero incentive' to break open 'trilogue' deals
  8. Denmark plans import ban on EU-approved pesticide

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us