Sunday

14th Aug 2022

EU wood and packaging rules scrapped

The EU has withdrawn two pieces of legislation from the bloc's lawbooks that have been deemed examples of over-regulation by Brussels.

Following a decision on Monday (21 May), regulations on timber quality and packaging sizes will be scrapped.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Become an expert on Europe

Get instant access to all articles — and 20 years of archives. 14-day free trial.

... or subscribe as a group

The "knots in wood" directive set out standards for European timber since 1968 while the packaging law laid out how goods - such as bread - should be packaged.

However, packaging sizes for wines and spirits will remain controlled by EU regulation.

Announcing the decision, EU industry commissioner Guenter Verheugen said the "decision underlines that we have moved from words to deeds and that we are hard working to cut unnecessary red-tape on all fronts."

The wood directive particularly - which regulated the quality and size of wood in the rough - was seen as a "symbol" of unnecessary bureaucracy from the commission.

Brussels announced its anti-red-tape drive in 2005 following years of complaints, especially by small and medium sized enterprises that the laws were crippling their business.

The move is also in reaction to a popular perception across Europe that associates the commission with unnecessary rules and bureaucracy.

But the commission's own self-regulation, announced with great fanfare two years ago, proved harder than it looked, with its in-house mentality about the necessity of making rules one of the first and toughest obstacles to overcome.

Sweden to extradite man wanted by Turkey

The Swedish government has agreed to extradite a Turkish citizen with Kurdish roots wanted for credit card fraud to Turkey, amid the backdrop of Turkey's Nato threat.

Opinion

EU must beware Beijing's new charm offensive

The EU needs to be clear eyed about China's new diplomatic charm offensive, as it's more likely driven by short-term necessity than any fundamental policy re-assessment.

Estonia and Latvia sever China club ties

Beijing's club was meant to forge stronger European relations. Lithuania left it last year. Now Estonia and Latvia have also decided to walk over Chinese bullying.

Estonia and Latvia sever China club ties

Beijing's club was meant to forge stronger European relations. Lithuania left it last year. Now Estonia and Latvia have also decided to walk over Chinese bullying.

News in Brief

  1. Germany to help nationals cope with energy price spike
  2. Germany wants pipeline from Portugal
  3. Ukraine urges US to sanction all Russian banks
  4. Spain evacuates 294 Afghans
  5. EU sanctions have 'limited' effect of Russian oil production
  6. Donors pledge €1.5bn to Ukraine's war effort
  7. Sweden overtakes France as EU's top power exporter
  8. Italy's far-right star in European charm offensive

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. EFBWW – EFBH – FETBBConstruction workers can check wages and working conditions in 36 countries
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic and Canadian ministers join forces to combat harmful content online
  3. European Centre for Press and Media FreedomEuropean Anti-SLAPP Conference 2022
  4. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic ministers write to EU about new food labelling
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersEmerging journalists from the Nordics and Canada report the facts of the climate crisis
  6. Council of the EUEU: new rules on corporate sustainability reporting

Latest News

  1. Defying Russian bombs, Ukraine football starts 2022 season
  2. Sweden to extradite man wanted by Turkey
  3. EU must beware Beijing's new charm offensive
  4. Forest fire near Bordeaux forces over 10,000 to flee
  5. Estonia and Latvia sever China club ties
  6. Russian coal embargo kicks in, as EU energy bills surge
  7. Only Western unity can stop Iran hostage-diplomacy
  8. Kosovo PM warns of renewed conflict with Serbia

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us