Thursday

20th Sep 2018

Belgium is no failed state, says PM

  • The Royal Palace "We return to normal life in Brussels and in Belgium," Charles Michel said. (Photo: Marianne Janssens)

Belgium's image "enormously worries" its prime minister. That is why two weeks after the 22 March twin attacks that killed 35 people at Brussels airport and in the metro, Charles Michel undertook on Wednesday (6 April) to convince foreign journalists that the country is not a failed state and that its capital is a welcoming city.

"We return to normal life in Brussels and in Belgium," Michel said in English at the start of a press conference at the Residence Palace, the international press centre at the heart of the EU quarter.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Support quality EU news

Get instant access to all articles — and 18 year's of archives. 30 days free trial.

... or join as a group

He said that the airport was gradually resuming its activities and would reach two thirds of its previous capacity by the end of the week. The metro should be back to normal next week, when the army and police will be able to secure all the network at all times.

"Resources for vigilance are extremely present, this is important in current circumstances," he said.

Standing next to him, the president of the Brussels region, Rudi Vervoort, insisted that the Belgian and EU capital was "welcoming, showing solidarity and open".

"What we feel here is different from what is said, especially abroad," he said.

Referring to the recent clashes during a memorial gathering in the city centre, he insisted that "a few dozens of excited people" are not representative.


He said that life in Brussels "continued as soon as on 23 March", the day after the attacks, and that the city could still welcome business events and political summits.

"We are a model for this type of event in Europe. Our police services are trained," he said.

Successes and failures

In their effort to depict Brussels and Belgium as normal and peaceful, Michel and Vervoort brushed aside criticism about actions by the authorities before and after the attack.

Michel admitted that the attacks were a "failure" for the authorities and lessons would have to be drawn, but he added that "there are successes and failures in Belgium as elsewhere".

He said that Belgium was "a small country in the heart of Europe" from which it was easy to go to Paris, London or Berlin to commit terrorist attacks, but he rejected the idea that it was the "weakest link" in Europe's anti-terror efforts.

He said "a failed state could not sentence more than 100 people" in terrorism-related cases as Belgium did last year.

"We prevented many attacks," he said, citing the dismantling of a terror cell in the town of Verviers in January 2015 and the arrest in 2001 of Nizar Trabelsi, who was planning an attack on the US embassy in Paris.

No magical solution

Showing irritability at questions on security shortcomings, Michel went on to say that the arrest of Salah Abdelslam in his childhood neighbourhood four months after the Paris attacks in which he took part was not a bad result.

"It took us a few months to arrest Abdelslam, it took more than 10 years to get Bin Laden," he said, referring to the mastermind of the 9/11 attacks, who was in the end hunted down in Pakistan.

The prime minister also rejected the idea that the multi-layer structure of the Belgian federal state, where responsibilities are divided, had a negative impact on security.

"The priority is to have institutions working, on repression and prevention, more than imagining that reforming the state would the magical solution that would prevent any risk of attack," he said.

Michel however promised to shed light on what happened when the parliament investigates the events. MPs will have the powers of a judge and will be able to conduct hearings and investigations, he said.

Security failures rock Belgian government

Prime minister Michel rejected the resignation of the interior and justice ministers after revelations that one of Tuesday's suicide bombers was freed last year.

Belgian airport to resume flights

Belgium’s national airport plans to resume flights on Thursday, but it will take “months” to get back to full capacity, its CEO says.

News in Brief

  1. EU-Arab League summit proposed for February in Egypt
  2. Stop 'migration blame-game', Tusk tells EU leaders
  3. McDonald's Luxembourg tax deal 'compatible' with EU rules
  4. Danish bank CEO resigns in Russia scandal
  5. Germany seeks to join EU's eastern energy club
  6. UK universities top EU in Chinese ranking
  7. Poland seeks 'Fort Trump' US military base
  8. EU stops Irish case after Apple pays €13bn

EU parliament will not budge on office expenses

Hungarian centre-right MEP Livia Jaroka sticks to earlier decision: documents related to the minor reform of the expenses system, requested by EUobserver, should remain secret.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. NORDIC COUNCIL OF MINISTERSThe Nordic gender effect goes international
  2. NORDIC COUNCIL OF MINISTERSPaula Lehtomaki from Finland elected as the Council's first female Secretary General
  3. NORDIC COUNCIL OF MINISTERSNordic design sets the stage at COP24, running a competition for sustainable chairs.
  4. Counter BalanceIn Kenya, a motorway funded by the European Investment Bank runs over roadside dwellers
  5. ACCACompany Law Package: Making the Best of Digital and Cross Border Mobility,
  6. IPHRCivil Society Worried About Shortcomings in EU-Kyrgyzstan Human Rights Dialogue
  7. UNESDAThe European Soft Drinks Industry Supports over 1.7 Million Jobs
  8. Mission of China to the EUJointly Building Belt and Road Initiative Leads to a Better Future for All
  9. IPHRCivil society asks PACE to appoint Rapporteur to probe issue of political prisoners in Azerbaijan
  10. ACCASocial Mobility – How Can We Increase Opportunities Through Training and Education?
  11. Nordic Council of MinistersEnergy Solutions for a Greener Tomorrow
  12. UNICEFWhat Kind of Europe Do Children Want? Unicef & Eurochild Launch Survey on the Europe Kids Want

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Countries Take a Stand for Climate-Smart Energy Solutions
  2. Mission of China to the EUChina: Work Together for a Better Globalisation
  3. Nordic Council of MinistersNordics Could Be First Carbon-Negative Region in World
  4. European Federation of Allergy and AirwaysLife Is Possible for Patients with Severe Asthma
  5. PKEE - Polish Energy AssociationCommon-Sense Approach Needed for EU Energy Reform
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Region to Lead in Developing and Rolling Out 5G Network
  7. Mission of China to the EUChina-EU Economic and Trade Relations Enjoy a Bright Future
  8. ACCAEmpowering Businesses to Engage with Sustainable Finance and the SDGs
  9. Nordic Council of MinistersCooperation in Nordic Electricity Market Considered World Class Model
  10. FIFAGreen Stadiums at the 2018 Fifa World Cup
  11. Mission of China to the EUChina and EU Work Together to Promote Sustainable Development
  12. Counter BalanceEuropean Ombudsman Requests More Lending Transparency from European Investment Bank

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us