Tuesday

1st Dec 2020

EU keen to set global rules on artificial intelligence

  • Over-regulation could limit Europe's capacity to innovate, especially in comparison to the US (Photo: Mike MacKenzie)

From Google translator to self-driving cars, artificial intelligence (AI) is expected to witness huge growth in the coming years.

Even though AI legislation in Europe and the US is only starting to be addressed by public authorities, big tech companies are already asking to set common standards across the globe.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Become an expert on Europe

Get instant access to all articles — and 20 years of archives. 14-day free trial.

... or subscribe as a group

After a draft white paper about the EU's position on AI regulation was leaked earlier this month, Google chief Sundar Pichai, on Monday (20 January), warned the bloc about imposing its own regulations and called for an "international alignment" on the core values of the future laws of the sector.

However, ahead of what is expected to be the fourth industrial revolution, the European Commission wants to ensure an "appropriate" ethical and legal framework for the development of AI, which promises to boost innovation while making EU citizens' rights a priority.

In November, commission chief Ursula von der Leyen pledged to develop AI legislation similar to the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), an EU law on privacy.

"It is not about damming up the flow of data, it is about making rules that define how to handle data responsibly," she told MEPs back then.

"For us, the protection of a person's digital identity is the overriding priority," she added.

According to Ursula Pachl, deputy director-general at the European Consumer Organisation (BEUC), an NGO in Brussels, "it is important that the European Commission has announced a legislative framework and is vocal about the ambition to become a global standard-setter in this area, much like it has done with the GDPR on data protection".

However, according to the commission's draft white paper - seen by EUobserver - this upcoming framework is likely to be built on existing legislation and risk-assessment or requirements for specific applications of these technologies rather than to plump for global sectoral requirements or bans.

Three 'promising' options

The leaked proposal suggests a few options that the commission is still considering for regulating the use of AI more generally - mainly to avoid breaches of fundamental rights, on safety issues, and on liability risks.

These include a voluntary labelling framework for developers (based on voluntary previsions for technology makers with binding conditions), imposing sectoral requirements for public administration (including the use of facial recognition), or mandatory risk-based requirement for "high-risk" applications (in sectors such as health care, policing, or transport).

The commission is also expected to amend existing EU safety and liability legislation to address the new risks.

The draft white paper emphasises the need to oversee the implementation and application of this technology to ensure compliance with EU law, although it says member states should decide whether to rely on existing authorities or create new bodies for the regulation of AI.

The text inidcates that mandatory requirement for "high-risk" applications, amendments to EU law and public enforcement are the most "promising" options to address the risks specific to AI.

However, some might say that while the EU wants to set the standards, over-regulation could limit Europe's capacity to innovate, especially in comparison to the US, where more "flexible frameworks" can be expected.

A ban? 'Not likely'

Additionally, the leaked proposal floats the idea of a three-to-five-year period in which the use of facial recognition technologies could be banned in public places to identify and address the possible risks of this technology.

However, "such a ban would be a far-reaching measure that might hamper the development and uptake of this technology," the commission writes, adding that "it would be preferable to focus on the full implementation of the provisions of the General Data Protection Regulation [GDPR]".

"The face recognition ban is mentioned in the paper, but the authors write twice that this approach is not recommended, [so] the European Commission might be 'considering' a ban, but it does not look like they will push for it," said Nicolas Kayser-Bril from NGO AlgorithmWatch.

The draft proposal highlights that such a ban will also necessarily foresee some exceptions.

Meanwhile, this regulatory safeguard could face opposition from many member states that have deployed these technologies, including Germany, France or Hungary.

According to Diego Naranjo, head of policy at NGO European Digital Rights (EDRi), "member states should stop deploying [facial recognition] technologies until specific EU legislation is adopted.

"There is no innovation in deploying mass surveillance of citizens. China is already doing it very effectively, while the US has developed the largest surveillance system worldwide as exposed by Snowden in his revelations," he added.

The European Commission is expected to unveil the white paper on the EU's apporach towards AI in mid-February and some of its policy recommendations are likely to change in the meantime.

Magazine

The challenge of artificial intelligence

The fast-growing impact of artificial intelligence will be the biggest challenge for business and consumers in Europe's single market of tomorrow.

Eight EU states miss artificial intelligence deadline

Pan-European strategy "encouraged" member states to publish national artificial intelligence strategies by mid-2019. Germany, France and the UK have already done so - others are lagging behind.

AI must have human oversight, MEPs recommend

The European Parliament's internal market committee (IMCO) insists humans must remain in control automated decision-making processes, ensuring that people are responsible and able to overrule the outcome of decisions made by computer algorithms.

EU Commission sticks to €20bn AI target, despite Covid

Despite the coronavirus crisis, the European Commission wants member states to attract more than €20bn of investment in artificial intelligence (AI) annually over the next decade to make Europe a leader of so-called 'trustworthy artificial intelligence'.

News in Brief

  1. EU medical agency to decide on Pfizer and Moderna vaccines
  2. Euro-bailout fund to also help banks
  3. Trade unions urge date for pay transparency directive
  4. 33 governments must answer youth climate lawsuit
  5. US slams Hungarian article for Soros/Hitler comparison
  6. Sturgeon doesn't rule out 2021 Scottish independence vote
  7. Hungary's Orban and Poland's Morawiecki meet again
  8. Gran Canaria migrant camp dismantled

Coronavirus

EU seeks new deal for '90% effective' Covid-19 vaccine

After an experimental Covid-19 vaccine developed by the American giant Pfizer and its German partner BioNTech was found to be more than 90 percent effective, the EU announced that it will sign a contract for up to 300 million doses.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersJoin the Nordic climate debate on 17 November!
  2. UNESDAMaking healthier diets the easy choice
  3. Nordic Council of MinistersUN Secretary General to meet with Nordic Council on COVID-19
  4. UNESDAWell-designed Deposit Return Schemes can help reach Single-Use Plastics Directive targets
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Council meets Belarusian opposition leader Svetlana Tichanovskaja
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Region to invest DKK 250 million in green digitalised business sector

Latest News

  1. China and Russia encircling divided Western allies
  2. Fish complicates last push for post-Brexit deal
  3. EU emissions down 24% on 1990 - but still off 2030 target
  4. Hungary must keep Russian vaccine within borders, says EU
  5. If EU is serious, it should use more US liquified gas, not less
  6. EU taxpayers in the dark on US corona-drug deal
  7. EU debates first names to go on human rights blacklist
  8. Lithuania bids to host EU cyber-centre

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us