Friday

1st Jul 2022

Agenda

Clock change and Merkel's fortunes top This WEEK

  • Merkel faces another difficult election in Hesse, before her party chairmanship is on the line in December (Photo: bundeskanzlerin.de)

Halloween-time is traditionally one of the quietest weeks in the EU bubble, with kids out of school, the European Parliament in recess, and most eurocrats leaving Brussels for the week.

Nevertheless, early in the week, EU-watchers can speculate what elections in yet another German region, Hesse, will mean for chancellor Angela Merkel's coalition in Berlin.

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Germany's ruling parties are bracing for a second electoral disaster only two weeks after the flop in Bavaria, as polls for Sunday's (28 October) regional election in Hesse suggest voters will punish parties in the coalition government.

Both Merkel's Christian Democrats (CDU) and coalition partner Social Democrats (SPD) are expected to suffer losses, reflecting a nationwide trend.

Hesse has, for the past 20 years, been ruled by CDU-led coalitions, but polls show Merkel's party could lose 12 points compared to elections in 2013.

This could spell trouble for Merkel, who stands for re-election as party leader at the CDU conference in December.

Polls have also confirmed another trend: the Social Democrats are tied with one of the big winners of the Bavaria election, the Greens, with both in second place with 21 percent.

On Sunday (28 October), clocks will have to be turned backwards one hour to end summertime officially.

The issue is now on the EU's agenda as well.

Environment and transport ministers will meet in Graz, Austria for an informal gathering on Monday and Tuesday (30 October).

On Monday (29 October) EU transport ministers will take up the question of abolishing daylight-saving time, a recent proposal by the EU commission, which said that, in its survey, 80 percent of respondents wanted to end the bi-annual clock change.

The commission will close its doors for a mini vacation next Thursday and Friday (1 and 2 November), as EU officials await the official response from Rome, whose budget plan the EU executive rejected last week. Italy has three weeks to submit a revised budgetary proposal.

With Brexit talks in Brussels still at a standstill, UK prime minister Theresa May will be speaking at the Nordic Council's session in Oslo on Tuesday (30 October) in front of parliamentarians and prime ministers from the five Nordic countries.

Bavarian election puts Merkel on defensive

Voters in Germany's largest state hived off to the left and right of the ruling conservatives in Sunday's elections - posing questions for Merkel's authority.

EU commission rejects Italy's budget plans

The EU executive has asked Italy to resubmit its budget in an unprecedented rebuke, while warning Rome that public debt was the "enemy of the people".

EU to propose scrapping summer time change

Based on the preliminary results of an online survey in which mostly Germans took part, the EU executive is proposing that the whole EU stops changing times in March and October.

G7, Nato, gas anxiety and Ukraine top This WEEK

EU energy ministers and environment ministers are expected to reach common positions on different aspects of the Fit for 55 package — as the continent is increasingly worried about energy prices and future supplies.

EU leaders talk Ukraine candidacy This WEEK

EU leaders will gather in Brussels and discuss Ukraine's candidacy status, and the impact of Russia's invasion of the country on energy and defence. European Central Bank chief Christine Lagarde will give a briefing to MEPs on inflation to MEPs.

Taxonomy and Ukraine on top This WEEK

MEPs will vote on an objection to the EU Commission's proposal to classify, temporarily, gas and nuclear energy investment as 'green', under the so-called taxonomy. Meanwhile, EU finance ministers are expected to approve Poland's recovery plan.

EU Parliament interpreters stage strike

Interpreters at the European Parliament are fed up with remote interpretation, citing auditory health issues given the poor quality of the online sessions.

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