Saturday

27th Nov 2021

New leader's election leaves Catalan crisis unresolved

  • 'The Catalan republic is [about] equality, liberty and fraternity', Torra said (Photo: parlament.cat)

Catalonia entered a new phase of uncertainty after the region's parliament elected a radical separatist as leader of the government on Monday (14 May).

Quim Torra, a former leader of the Omnium Cultural activist group, got 66 votes against 65, with the radical left CUP party abstaining.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Become an expert on Europe

Get instant access to all articles — and 20 years of archives. 14-day free trial.

... or subscribe as a group

"Long live free Catalonia," he declared after his election.



In the debate ahead of the vote, Torra said he was still committed to the result of last year's independence referendum - but promised to reach out to anti-independence citizens in Catalonia.

"With a republic, everyone will win rights, nobody will lose rights: these are for everyone, no matter which way they vote. The Catalan republic is [about] equality, liberty and fraternity," he said.

Spanish prime minister Mariano Rajoy reacted by saying that he would "bet on understanding and agreement in looking at the future."

But he also warned that he would "make sure that the law, the Spanish constitution and the rest of the legal system, are obeyed."

Torra's election puts an end to more than seven months of political crisis, since the 1 October referendum was followed by a declaration of independence, the suspension of Catalonia's autonomy and elections that failed to give a clear majority.

When Torra's government is in place, Rajoy will be required to lift the application of Article 155 of the constitution, the original basis for the suspension of the region's autonomy.

But what the two leaders will do next remains unclear.

"We'll have another crisis," said Camino Mortera-Martinez, from the Brussels-based Centre for European Reform think tank.

She noted that both Torra and Rajoy had the choice between two bad options.

The new Catalan leader, who was chosen by Carles Puigdemont, the Berlin-exiled leader who organised the referendum last year, has promised to stay at his post only until Puigdemont is cleared of rebellion and embezzlement charges and can return to Barcelona.

"Will he follow Puigdemont's orders or will he go for his own political goals?" Mortera-Martinez asked.

She pointed out that Torra was "a kind of more radical pro-independence [figure] than Puigdemont", and his separatist views were based on culture and language, while Puigdemont focused more on social issues.

Weaker Rajoy

If Torra waits for a hypothetical return of Puigdemont, "Catalonia will be heading for a longer time of doing nothing and it will not be good for the economy", Mortera-Martinez said.

But if Torra starts taking political measures, "we have the risk an open conflict [with Madrid] and the risk of taking it to the streets," she said.

Rajoy, for his part, "is weaker than in October," the political scientist noted.

Rajoy's tough stand on Catalonia failed to weaken separatists in the December elections, or to deter them from electing a hardliner as the region's new leader.

If Rajoy, who will meet the opposition leaders on Tuesday and Wednesday, does nothing, "he takes the risk of a future ... crisis," Mortera-Martinez said.



She wondered however how the prime minister would be able to explain a potential re-activation of Article 155.

"What kind of message would he be giving to the Catalans?" she asked, adding that in Madrid, he is under growing criticism from the Ciudadanos party for not being strong enough.

'Discriminatory populism'

The possibility for dialogue could also be hindered by Torra's controversial previous comments on Spain.

In messages on Twitter that he erased last week, he said among other that "Spaniards only know how to plunder" and that those who don't defend the Catalan language and culture were "scavengers, vipers and hyenas."

"I'm sorry. This won't happen again," he said on Monday, while Ines Arrimadas, the leader of the Catalan opposition, accused him of "xenophobia and discriminatory populism".

In Brussels, where the EU kept its distance throughout the political crisis, the European Commission declined to comment on Torra's election.

Asked about Torra's past comments on Spain, the commission spokesman said he would not "dignify them with a comment".

Germany detains Catalan ex-leader Puigdemont

German authorities may extradite former Catalan leader Carles Puigdemont to Spain where he faces up to 25 years in jail following charges of sedition and rebellion by the Madrid government.

Interview

Catalan crisis will 'go on for months'

The president of the EU's Committee of the Regions, Karl-Heinz Lambertz, said that both the separatists and Spanish authorities made mistakes.

Puigdemont reclaims Catalonia's leadership

Back in Belgium after Spain lifted a European Arrest Warrant against him, the separatist former leader wants to be the real power behind the region's government and a new push for independence.

Catalonia diplomats back in action abroad

The new regional government is to reopen its representations aboard. In Brussels, its new foreign minister Ernest Maragall insisted that it wanted to show "responsibility".

News in Brief

  1. Covid variant: EU to block travel from southern Africa
  2. France and UK seek EU help on Channel migrants
  3. New Swedish PM who resigned after 7 hours gets second chance
  4. Belgium to decide on Friday on Covid measures
  5. UK rings alarm on new Covid strain in South Africa
  6. Turkish police use tear gas at women's rights march
  7. Poland calls for more Nato troops
  8. Ex-Navalny aide leaves Russia

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersNew report reveals bad environmental habits
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersImproving the integration of young refugees
  3. Nordic Council of MinistersNATO Secretary General guest at the Session of the Nordic Council
  4. Nordic Council of MinistersCan you love whoever you want in care homes?
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersNineteen demands by Nordic young people to save biodiversity
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersSustainable public procurement is an effective way to achieve global goals

Latest News

  1. Belgium goes into three-week 'lockdown light'
  2. MEPs list crimes of 'Kremlin proxy' mercenaries
  3. EU to open up 'black box' of political ads
  4. Can the ECB solve climate change and inflation on its own?
  5. EU set to limit vaccine certificate to nine months
  6. Surprise coalition in Romania without former Renew's Ciolos
  7. This 'Black Friday' is a turning point in corporate accountability
  8. West struggling to show strength on Ukraine

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us