Monday

23rd Sep 2019

Iran: EU and Trump mark divorce on world stage

  • US leader Donald Trump scrapped the Iran nuclear deal last May (Photo: whitehouse.gov)

Europe's split with the US on foreign policy has widened after three EU states created a new company designed to skirt US sanctions on Iran.

Britain, France, and Germany registered the new entity, called an Instrument in Support of Trade Exchanges, or Instex, in Paris on Thursday (31 January).

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Support quality EU news

Get instant access to all articles — and 18 year's of archives. 30 days free trial.

... or join as a group

  • Iran's Javed Zarif speaks to EU diplomats at security conference in Munich, Germany, in 2014 (Photo: securityconference.de)

It is to be managed by a German former banker, Per Fischer, and is to start trade in food and medicine with Iran in the next few months, excluding US banks and US dollar transactions, in a way that removes the legal basis for the US to sanction firms which take part.

The move was announced by Britain, France, and Germany at an informal EU foreign ministers' meeting in Romania.

It comes after months of EU complaints that US leader Donald Trump's decision to reimpose sanctions on Iran last May would wreck a nuclear arms control deal agreed with Tehran in 2015, prompting a nuclear arms race in the Middle East.

It also comes amid a laundry list of other EU scraps with Trump - on Nato, Russia, Syria, Israel, free trade, and climate change - as well as the US leader's verbal tirades against Europe.

Instex would facilitate "legitimate trade between European economic operators and Iran" and would be "open to economic operators from third countries who wish to trade with Iran" in future, Britain, France, and Germany said in a joint statement.

The idea is to use it to trade oil and gas down the line.

But the project has a wider potential to "teach its managers lessons that can be applied to other cases [besides Iran] in the future," Jarrett Blan, a former state department official now with the Carnegie Europe think tank in Washington, said earlier this month.

The US has also threatened to punish British, Dutch, French and German companies taking part in Russia's plan to build a new gas pipeline to Germany, called Nord Stream 2.

For Heiko Maas, the German foreign minister, Instex was primarily a "precondition for us to meet the obligations we entered into in order to demand from Iran that it doesn't begin military uranium enrichment".

France's Jean-Yves Le Drian said in Bucharest it was "a political act ... a gesture to protect European companies".

"Registration is a big step, but there is still more work to be done," British foreign minister Jeremy Hunt said.

The Instex move was welcomed by EU foreign relations chief Federica Mogherini and by Iranian foreign minister Javad Zarif, who called it "a long overdue first step".

Failure foretold

The US state department said it would fail, however.

"As the president has made clear, entities that continue to engage in sanctionable activity involving Iran risk severe consequences that could include losing access to the US financial system and the ability to do business with the United States or US companies," it said on Thursday.

US ambassadors in the EU, such as the one in Brussels and the one in Berlin, have being saying the same in contacts with CEOs of European firms.

Leading EU companies, including German engineering giant Siemens, German chemicals firm Basf, and French oil and gas firm Total have pledged to quit Iran in response.

The exodus of EU and US firms leaves Iran open to Chinese and Russian investors instead.

"At the end of the day, it will be companies that decide whether or not they want to work in Iran, bearing in mind the risk of American sanctions," Belgian foreign minister Didier Reynders said in Bucharest on Thursday.

The 2015 nuclear arms control treaty does not cover Iran's ballistic missile programme, human rights abuses, or other problems, such as Iran's recent attempts to assassinate regime opponents in Denmark and France.

The EU, earlier this month, blacklisted two Iran regime members and part of the Iranian ministry for intelligence and security over the Danish and French plots.

Same direction?

"We're clear: This commitment [the 2015 nuclear deal] does not in any way preclude us from addressing Iran's hostile and destabilising activities," Hunt, the British foreign minister said.

It was "essential we show our American colleagues that we are going in the same direction as them" on other aspects of Iran foreign policy, Belgium's Reynders added.

Trump's presidency has marked the worst rift in the transatlantic alliance in the past 70 years of its post-WW2 history despite the EU politeness, however.

It is also likely to leave a bitter after-taste even when he, one day, departs.

"The way in which ... the American administration makes policy in general at the moment, with a lot of sanctions, with the fact that international agreements are scrapped, is not a good way to cooperate," Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer, the head of the ruling CDU party in Germany, told Bloomberg, a US news agency, last week.

EU firms in Iran caught between US and Europe

European companies with business in Iran appear caught in a tug of war between the European Union and Washington. The US demands they leave Iran or face sanctions. The European Union says remain in Iran or face penalties a home.

Markets shun Nord Stream 2 amid US threat

Markets unwilling to lend money to finance the Russia gas pipeline due to risk of US sanctions, forcing its EU backers to "review" their plans.

Analysis

EU should stop an insane US-Iran war

"If Iran wants to fight, that will be the official end of Iran. Never threaten the United States again!", US president Donald Trump tweeted on Monday (20 May).

News in Brief

  1. Barnier: Johnson's plan for Irish backstop unacceptable
  2. Google will only listen to audio if users give consent
  3. German bank fined for cheating Danish tax system
  4. Supreme Court ruling on Johnson on Tuesday
  5. 10 arrests over possible Catalonia anniversary attacks
  6. 53% of Europeans think LGTBI discrimination is widespread
  7. Doubt cast on new Maltese inquiry into slain reporter
  8. March by Slovak Catholics seeks abortion ban

Column

These are the crunch issues for the 2019-2024 EU commission

These developments will largely determine who will be running the world in the coming decades and perhaps generations. If the Europeans can't find an answer over the five years, they will be toast. And we haven't even mentioned climate change.

Opinion

Time to pay attention to Belarus

Belarus may be hosting the European Games, but Vladimir Putin is not playing games when it comes to Belarus' independence. The West needs to get serious as well.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. UNESDASoft drinks industry co-signs Circular Plastics Alliance Declaration
  2. FEANIEngineers Europe Advisory Group: Building the engineers of the future
  3. Nordic Council of MinistersNew programme studies infectious diseases and antibiotic resistance
  4. UNESDAUNESDA reduces added sugars 11.9% between 2015-2017
  5. International Partnership for Human RightsEU-Uzbekistan Human Rights Dialogue: EU to raise key fundamental rights issues
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersNo evidence that social media are harmful to young people
  7. Nordic Council of MinistersCanada to host the joint Nordic cultural initiative 2021
  8. Vote for the EU Sutainable Energy AwardsCast your vote for your favourite EUSEW Award finalist. You choose the winner of 2019 Citizen’s Award.
  9. Nordic Council of MinistersEducation gets refugees into work
  10. Counter BalanceSign the petition to help reform the EU’s Bank
  11. UNICEFChild rights organisations encourage candidates for EU elections to become Child Rights Champions
  12. UNESDAUNESDA Outlines 2019-2024 Aspirations: Sustainability, Responsibility, Competitiveness

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Counter BalanceRecord citizens’ input to EU bank’s consultation calls on EIB to abandon fossil fuels
  2. International Partnership for Human RightsAnnual EU-Turkmenistan Human Rights Dialogue takes place in Ashgabat
  3. Nordic Council of MinistersNew campaign: spot, capture and share Traces of North
  4. Nordic Council of MinistersLeading Nordic candidates go head-to-head in EU election debate
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersNew Secretary General: Nordic co-operation must benefit everybody
  6. Platform for Peace and JusticeMEP Kati Piri: “Our red line on Turkey has been crossed”
  7. UNICEF2018 deadliest year yet for children in Syria as war enters 9th year
  8. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic commitment to driving global gender equality
  9. International Partnership for Human RightsMeet your defender: Rasul Jafarov leading human rights defender from Azerbaijan
  10. UNICEFUNICEF Hosts MEPs in Jordan Ahead of Brussels Conference on the Future of Syria
  11. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic talks on parental leave at the UN
  12. International Partnership for Human RightsTrial of Chechen prisoner of conscience and human rights activist Oyub Titiev continues.

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us