Wednesday

26th Apr 2017

Romanian social democrats set for return to power

  • It is unclear whether convicted Socialist leader Liviu Dragnea could become prime minister. (Photo: Partidul Social Democrat)

Romania’s Social Democrats are set to return to power a year after a major anti-corruption campaign forced the last Socialist prime minister from power.

The Social Democrat Party (PSD) won parliamentary elections on Sunday (12 December) with about 46 percent of the votes, according to official figures.

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Their rival, the centre-right Liberals (PNL) received around 21 percent of the votes, while allies and newcomers to Romanian politics, the anti-corruption party Save Romania Union (USR) was on nine percent.

The PSD's likely coalition partner, the liberal Alde party, won around 6.5 percent, meaning they could secure a majority in the parliament.

The low turnout at the ballot boxes, 39.5 percent, likely aided the PSD's strong showing.

"Romania is an island of stability. I want this stable democracy to remain in place," PSD's leader, Liviu Dragnea, 54, was quoted by AFP.

"This means that all politicians and institutions have to respect today's vote. We should all understand that Romania needs a competent, stable and responsible government," he added.

Dragnea said his party would try to form a coalition with the Alde.

But it's yet to be seen whether he could become prime minister, as he received a two-year suspended prison sentence for voter fraud in April.

This bars him under Romanian law from becoming prime minister, and it would also stop former PM Victor Ponta from returning to power.

The 44-year-old Ponta is on trial for alleged tax evasion and money laundering. He denies the charges.

Corruption clean-up

PSD's revival comes only a year after a deadly nightclub fire in October 2015 at a Bucharest club, which became a symbol for a wider discontent and marked a turning point in calling for an end to corruption.

The fire, in which 64 people died, was blamed on corrupt officials turning a blind eye to a lack of fire precautions and standards.

The corruption crackdown that ensued after the tragic fire forced Ponta to resign.

Since then the country has been run by former EU commissioner Dacian Ciolos, 47, an independent who was backed by PNL and USR.

In the meantime, the National Anti-Corruption Directorate, the agency responsible for the anti-corruption drive, put former ministers, media moguls, and judges under investigation.

PSD's return to power could slow down the drive against corruption. It campaigned with an increase in pensions and other social spending, and tax cuts, in one of the poorest EU countries.

Romanian anti-corruption protests bring down PM

A nightclub fire that killed 32 people in Bucharest has triggered a popular movement against corruption in the capital and in the government. PM Ponta promised to resign.

Romanian president rejects PM designate

Social democrats and liberals said they could unseat the country's president - Klaus Iohannis - after he vetoed the nomination of a woman with alleged ties to Assad regime in Syria.

Analysis

Orban set to face down EU threats

The European Commission and Parliament are to debate Hungary's slide into illiberal democracy. But the bloc continues to think that Hungarian leader Viktor Orban is not a systemic threat.

France still anxious over possibility of Le Pen win

Despite opinion polls that place centrist Macron well ahead of the far-right leader Le Pen in the 7 May presidential run-off, doubts are emerging about his capacity to unite the French people around his candidacy.

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