Sunday

16th May 2021

The EU and cyber security

Cloud computing, smartphones, viruses attacking nuclear plants. In the October Focus, the EUobserver turns its attention to cyber security and EU's attempts to set up rules for safer navigation on the internet.

Kroes demands internet security strategy

EU Digital Agenda Commissioner Neelie Kroes Tuesday reiterated her call for an EU-wide internet security strategy, arguing that EU authorities have not done enough to establish defence mechanisms to prevent cyber attacks.

Europol wants to host EU cyber crime centre

The EU's joint policy body, Europol, is angling to host a new European cyber crime centre, with the European Commission due next year to decide where to put its new defence against online threats.

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EU struggling to fight cyber crime

Faced with increasing cyber attacks, the EU is looking at a new law criminalising the use of 'zombie' computers and is setting up a 'cyber crime' agency and special teams of IT firefighters. But specialists and data privacy defenders remain unconvinced.

EU companies banned from selling spyware to repressive regimes

European companies selling online surveillance technology have come under increasing criticism from NGOs and the European Parliament after it emerged their products had helped regimes in Iran, Egypt and Libya to clamp down on protesters.

Smartphones are 'data goldmines' for hackers

Smartphones allows us watch videos, listen to music, check emails, find the nearest restaurant, and update our 'status' on Twitter and Facebook, but with the increased technology comes new and largely under-appreciated security threats.

Cloud providers warn against EU 'over-regulation'

The EU should not attempt to "over-regulate" the constantly changing market of "cloud computing" - outsourced data storage and computing facilities which can cut costs for businesses and government bodies - industry says.

'There's a computer worm in your nuclear centrifuge'

With the discovery of Stuxnet, a computer worm believed to have been developed by the US government to shut down a nuclear plant in Iran, European companies like Siemens are coming under increased pressure to secure software operating 'critical infrastructure' such as power plants or water treatment facilities.

Estonia training Nato 'techies' for cyberwar

In an unassuming, renovated military barracks dating back to tsarist times, Nato's cyber defence centre in Tallinn is training computer experts to secure networks from attacks. The training comes amid rising cyber threats from China and Russia.

EU institutions to create new cyber defence unit

EU institutions are setting up a joint team of internet security experts some three months after the European Commission was hacked in a bid to get sensitive data on external relations and monetary issues.

Opinion

Cyber security: public problem, private answers

New worms, malware, phishing techniques and predatory programmes are born every day. To fight this new intangible enemy, Europe must use its best suited troops: innovative SMEs, says Jonathan Zuck.